THE IMPACT OF
CULTURE IN SCHOOLS
EXAMINING THE IMPACT OF CULTURE ON
ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

• Asian Children see the world in terms of the relationship
betwe...
THREE THEORIES THAT EXPLAIN
DIFFERENCES IN SCHOOL
PERFORMANCE AMONG DIFFERENT
RACIAL AND ETHNIC GROUPS
CULTURAL DEFICIT THEORY
•

It proposes that deficiencies in the home environment result in short
comings in skills, knowl...
HOW CULTURAL DIFFERENCES MAY
AFFECT STUDENT PERFORMANCE

• Children in various cultures learn different rules for
communic...
“ A Picture is worth a
thousand words”
• When the verbal and nonverbal message don’t match up,
people pay more attention t...
EYE CONTACT

• Latin American and Asian- show respect by avoiding the
glance

• American Indian- “showing off”
PHYSICAL CO...
• To create a positive environment for communication,
your nonverbal message must closely match your verbal
message.

• Wh...
CULTURALLY FAMILIAR
ANALOGIES IN THE
CLASSROOM
• Every student must have an equal opportunity to achieve
his/ her full potential

• Every student must be prepared to com...
• Reshaping the curriculum so that it is culturally
responsive to the background of students.

• By recognizing and accept...
SCHOOL AS CULTURAL
INSTITUTION
• Schools has cultural functions which refer to the
contribution of schools to the cultural transmission and
development a...
• In

school, norms, values and beliefs of society is
introduced.

• In the community and society levels, schools often se...
RACISM
• A belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the
various human races determine cultural or individual
ach...
ETHNOCENTRISM
• Is the tendency to believe that one’s ethnic or cultural
group is centrally important and that all other g...
THANK YOU 
GROUP 6
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Madridijo, Joan
Montealto, Carmina
Ramoga, Sarah
Angco, Amie
Calihim, Myra
Sumalpong, Cristephen

G...
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ELECTIVE 1 (The impact of culture in schools)

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Elective1- The Impact of Culture in Schools
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ELECTIVE 1 (The impact of culture in schools)

  1. 1. THE IMPACT OF CULTURE IN SCHOOLS
  2. 2. EXAMINING THE IMPACT OF CULTURE ON ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE • Asian Children see the world in terms of the relationship between things whereas the American Children see the world in terms of the object as distinct entities.
  3. 3. THREE THEORIES THAT EXPLAIN DIFFERENCES IN SCHOOL PERFORMANCE AMONG DIFFERENT RACIAL AND ETHNIC GROUPS
  4. 4. CULTURAL DEFICIT THEORY • It proposes that deficiencies in the home environment result in short comings in skills, knowledge and behaviors that contribute to poor school performance. EXPECTATION THEORY • Focuses on how teacher treat students • Students who experience high expectations seek to reach the level of expected behaviors and students who experience low expectations act to meet the level of behavior expected to them CULTURAL DIFFERENCE THEORY • It is based on the idea that students who are raised in different cultural setting may approach education and learn in different ways.
  5. 5. HOW CULTURAL DIFFERENCES MAY AFFECT STUDENT PERFORMANCE • Children in various cultures learn different rules for communicating with adults through facial expressions, body language and physical gestures. Learn how cultural differences can play out in the classroom.
  6. 6. “ A Picture is worth a thousand words” • When the verbal and nonverbal message don’t match up, people pay more attention to the nonverbal message.
  7. 7. EYE CONTACT • Latin American and Asian- show respect by avoiding the glance • American Indian- “showing off” PHYSICAL CONTACT • Asia (Female)- hold hands • Asia (Male)- embrace one another as they walk on down the street
  8. 8. • To create a positive environment for communication, your nonverbal message must closely match your verbal message. • When a person is sensitive to these silent messages, he/she is far more likely to interact with others in a friendly, comfortable manner and to make his spoken message more understandable.
  9. 9. CULTURALLY FAMILIAR ANALOGIES IN THE CLASSROOM
  10. 10. • Every student must have an equal opportunity to achieve his/ her full potential • Every student must be prepared to competently participate in an increasing intercultural society • Active teaching methods that promote student engagement • Cultural sensitivity
  11. 11. • Reshaping the curriculum so that it is culturally responsive to the background of students. • By recognizing and accepting student diversity, it communicates that all students are welcome and valued as human beings. • By building on student’s cultural backgrounds, culturally responsive teaching communicates positive images about the students home culture. • By being responsive to different student learning styles, culturally responsive teaching builds on student’s strengths and uses these to help students learn.
  12. 12. SCHOOL AS CULTURAL INSTITUTION
  13. 13. • Schools has cultural functions which refer to the contribution of schools to the cultural transmission and development at different levels of society. • School act as a place for systematic cultural transmission and reproduction of the next generation.
  14. 14. • In school, norms, values and beliefs of society is introduced. • In the community and society levels, schools often serve as a cultural unit carrying the explicit norms and expectation of the local community, transmit all the important values and artifacts of society to students, integrate the diverse subcultures from different backgrounds and revitalize the strengths of the existing culture such that the society or the nation can reduce internal conflicts and wastage, and build up a unifying force for national conflicts.
  15. 15. RACISM • A belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one’s own race is superior and has the right to rule others.
  16. 16. ETHNOCENTRISM • Is the tendency to believe that one’s ethnic or cultural group is centrally important and that all other groups are measured in relation to one’s own.
  17. 17. THANK YOU 
  18. 18. GROUP 6 • • • • • • • Madridijo, Joan Montealto, Carmina Ramoga, Sarah Angco, Amie Calihim, Myra Sumalpong, Cristephen Gracia, Richmon Allan
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