Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Saving by Sharing
Collective Housing for Sustainable Lifestyles
by Prof. Emer. Dick Urban Vestbro, KTH, Stockholm; March20...
Concepts and Aims
Concepts                           Aims
Cohousing (Durrett & McCa-         • Simplify everyday life, esp...
Historical development of
     communal living ideas
                                                                     ...
How much can be
 saved by sharing?
• 15 households abstaining 10%
  of normal private space allows
  access to 120 sqm com...
The Stolplyckan model, Linköping




                  • 184 apartments, divided
                    into staircase units
...
Collective housing - for sustainable lifestyles
The ’commons’ dilemma’: as an individual
it feels meaningless to do someth...
Things residents can do together
                                           Breakfast club, study circle, parents’ café, c...
Which categories prefer collective living?
Earlier: well educated people
born in the 1940s, working in pub-
lic sector, wo...
Individualism replacing kinship
ties and need for company?
• 75% one& two person households today
• Increase of small hous...
Theory of gender and communal space
 From “The New Everyday Life - ways and means”, 1991 & Oscar Newman: ’Defensible Space...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Save by Sharing

1,068

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,068
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Save by Sharing"

  1. 1. Saving by Sharing Collective Housing for Sustainable Lifestyles by Prof. Emer. Dick Urban Vestbro, KTH, Stockholm; March2010 Presentation based on • Research on cohousing 1964 - today • Teaching of house planning and design • Experience as an activist, chairman of Swedish association Cohousing NOW
  2. 2. Concepts and Aims Concepts Aims Cohousing (Durrett & McCa- • Simplify everyday life, esp. mant, based on DK exp.) to combine family life and Collaborative housing job (gender equality) (Fromm) • Demand for moderate Collective housing (incl. servi- sense of community ces through employed staff) • Access to common spaces Communes (without individual and facilities such as guest apartments) rooms, club rooms , work- Intentional Communities shops , tools etc • Promote sustainable (Eco-villages) (Cooperative housing) lifestyles
  3. 3. Historical development of communal living ideas Cohousing Smaller communities Oneida Communes Shakers Eco-villages Kibbutzim Bofælleskab Self-work (DK) model Robert Owen (GB) Collective Charles Fourier (F) housing 2nd half Godin’s fami- (Sovjet) of life m. listère (F) Apartment hotels (USA) Senior Collective Service housing Central kit- housing (SE) housing chen h. Family hotels (elderly) 1800 1900 2000 Blue = rational society; Red = ideal life; Green = ecological or other goals
  4. 4. How much can be saved by sharing? • 15 households abstaining 10% of normal private space allows access to 120 sqm common space • 40 households abstaining 10% of normal private space allows access to 320 sqm common space • Access to common spaces may motivate fewer private rooms • Possible to share cars, expen- sive tools, workshops, compost, newspaper subscriptions, library etc.
  5. 5. The Stolplyckan model, Linköping • 184 apartments, divided into staircase units • 10% reduction of apts • 2000 sqm common spaces • Municipal service as a base (care of children, elderly) • Own cooking in evenings
  6. 6. Collective housing - for sustainable lifestyles The ’commons’ dilemma’: as an individual it feels meaningless to do something for the environment, but as a collective it may be enjoyable and meaningful In collective housing one may share news paper subscriptions, expensive tools, guest rooms, laser writers, books, children’s clothes, toys etc. Cultivation, Prästgårdshagen Alotments gardens, Fristad Composting, Phagen Ecological food, Tullstugan
  7. 7. Things residents can do together Breakfast club, study circle, parents’ café, culti- vation, subscription to papers, kate flying, disco, mascerade, karaoke, children’s parties, movies, playing games, art work, music, photo, carpen- try, ceramics, badminton, indoor bandy, sauna, weaving, composting, pancake parties, billard, flea markets, barbecues, repair sessions, book Oiling furniture, Tullstugan clubs, poetry evening, excursions. Carpentry, Phagen Textile work, Fristad Weaving, Fristad Cleaning stairs, Phagen
  8. 8. Which categories prefer collective living? Earlier: well educated people born in the 1940s, working in pub- lic sector, women, families with children, ’postmaterialists’ Today: as above but more mixed, not as ideological, single mothers, elderly. Anti-consumerists? Sign board reflects alternative movement ideas Resident meeting, Prästgårdshagen, Stockholm Garden party, Blenda, Uppsala
  9. 9. Individualism replacing kinship ties and need for company? • 75% one& two person households today • Increase of small households continues • Does individualism help people to live alone? • Do people get enough company from work, associations, eating out, visiting friends? “Household explosion” Living alone reduces health and wellbeing
  10. 10. Theory of gender and communal space From “The New Everyday Life - ways and means”, 1991 & Oscar Newman: ’Defensible Space’ 1974 Patriarchal view: separate Female view: local quali- functions, big gestures, ties, human scale inte- abstract forms grated functions In-between level - Local tasks - Local organisation - Local economy Private cells + monumen- Semiprivate & communal spaces for local social life & tal public places crime prevention
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×