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Stories, Success & YouAn Interactive Session in the iFoundry Series Emergent Student Leaders WorkshopsDavid E. GoldbergThr...
Check in
What does it mean to be “centered?”
Exercise: Pause Practice•  Close eyes.•  Take 3 deep   breaths.•  Notice your   emotional-   mental state.
7 Missing Basics of Engineering1.    Asking questions (Socrates      101)2.    Labeling patterns in data      (Aristotle 1...
2 Questions•  What do engineers   actually do during   the day?•  What artifacts do   engineers actually   produce   thems...
Language Central to Engineering Work!•  Engineers do math occasionally.•  Engineers draw or sketch occasionally.•  Enginee...
What is language?
Conventional vs. New ViewConventional                 New View•    We are thinking beings. •  We are linguistic•    Langua...
What is a distinction?
Distinctions•  Making a distinction is   the use of a term or   terms to discriminate   between things as   different.•  A ...
Distinction Listening Exercise•  Form listener-storyteller pair.•  Storyteller tells a recent story about experience.•  Li...
Level-One vs. Level-Two ListeningLevel One                    Level Two•  Listen from ego.          •  Listen to other.•  ...
Secret Shortcut to Open-Ended Questions•  Begin question with the word “what.”    – What do you mean by the term “X.”    –...
Distinction Listening Exercise•  Form listener-storyteller pair.•  Storyteller tells a recent story about experience.•  Li...
Debrief
Speech Act Theory: How Language Works•  Speech acts: 5 different types.•  Can describe, promise, command, etc.•  Austin defi...
Speech Acts in Practice•  Speech Act: Speaker says   something, means something, tries   to communicate to another.•  5 “i...
Assertions versus Assessments•  Assertions committed to the truth.•  Assessments committed to expressing an   opinion.•  C...
Why is it useful to distinguish between   assertions and assessments?
From Data  Judgment in 25 ms•  Set of things happen in an event.•  Our minds immediately interpret   the facts and jump t...
4 Ways to Invite Communication•  Real data is not the problem: Just the facts ma’am.•  4 tactics with assessments:    –  L...
Stories that Serve, Stories that Don’t•  All stories a combination of   assertions and assessments:     –  Assertions (if ...
What stories serve us? What stories don’t?
Common Stories That Hold Back•  2 stories:    – Mommy/daddy story. If I get <X>, my      mommy/daddy will love/appreciate ...
Enlarging Stories That Enhance/Advance•  Many ways to enhance stories and visual   different future.•  One way is the impos...
Two Takeaways
For PresenceAwaken to the mystery of being here and enter the quiet immensity of   your own presence.Have joy and peace in...
Stories, Success & YouAn Interactive Session in the Series Mastering the Missing Basics of EngineeringDavid E. GoldbergThr...
Stories, Success & You
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Stories, Success & You

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Engineers think of themselves as builders, but most of the building they do is done by others. Engineers are constantly in language, yet an engineering education spends little time on the nuts and bolts of stories, speech, and the effective use of language. This short interactive presentation considers these matters through experiential learning.

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Transcript of "Stories, Success & You"

  1. 1. Stories, Success & YouAn Interactive Session in the iFoundry Series Emergent Student Leaders WorkshopsDavid E. GoldbergThreeJoy Associates, Inc. & University of IllinoisChampaign, IL 61821 USAdeg@threejoy.com
  2. 2. Check in
  3. 3. What does it mean to be “centered?”
  4. 4. Exercise: Pause Practice•  Close eyes.•  Take 3 deep breaths.•  Notice your emotional- mental state.
  5. 5. 7 Missing Basics of Engineering1.  Asking questions (Socrates 101)2.  Labeling patterns in data (Aristotle 101)3.  Modeling conceptually (Hume 101)4.  Decomposing (Descartes 101)5.  Experimenting (Locke 101)6.  Visualizing/ideating (Da Vinci 101)7.  Communicating (Newman 101) Socrates  
  6. 6. 2 Questions•  What do engineers actually do during the day?•  What artifacts do engineers actually produce themselves?
  7. 7. Language Central to Engineering Work!•  Engineers do math occasionally.•  Engineers draw or sketch occasionally.•  Engineers build or construct (themselves) very rarely•  Engineers use language constantly (in person, on paper, on computer or other electronic device). John R. Searle (b. 1932)•  Takes many forms & purposes.•  Familiar with language as describing.•  Focus on language in creation and action.
  8. 8. What is language?
  9. 9. Conventional vs. New ViewConventional New View•  We are thinking beings. •  We are linguistic•  Language separate beings. tool we use from time to •  We are in language all time. the time.•  Language is descriptive •  Language is and large passive. generative & creative•  Language is merely an (not merely passive & descriptive). extension of thought. •  Language is action. To speak is to act.
  10. 10. What is a distinction?
  11. 11. Distinctions•  Making a distinction is the use of a term or terms to discriminate between things as different.•  A conceptual separation or demarcation.•  Intuitively, the way we dimensionalize stories.•  Neil Stroul: “Distinctions are the horse your stories ride in on.”
  12. 12. Distinction Listening Exercise•  Form listener-storyteller pair.•  Storyteller tells a recent story about experience.•  Listeners listen at level-two (level-one you relate story to own experience, level-two you listen to story from other person’s perspective).•  Listeners make a list of distinctions the storyteller makes in her/his story.•  If the listener is unsure what is meant by term, ask “What do you mean by <term>?”
  13. 13. Level-One vs. Level-Two ListeningLevel One Level Two•  Listen from ego. •  Listen to other.•  Interrupt to tell your •  Interrupt to get story. clarification from other.•  Relate how story •  Relate how one part of reminds you of similar story relates to other experience you had. things person said. •  Ask many questions,•  Ask few questions, mainly open-ended. mainly info gathering. •  Important thing is•  Important thing is your understanding the other. being understood.
  14. 14. Secret Shortcut to Open-Ended Questions•  Begin question with the word “what.” – What do you mean by the term “X.” – What is possible? – What else did you see/do/think/feel? – What would a successful outcome be?•  Open-ended questions invite the other to continue, reflect, and articulate their thoughts.
  15. 15. Distinction Listening Exercise•  Form listener-storyteller pair.•  Storyteller tells a recent story about experience.•  Listeners listen at level-two (level-one you relate story to own experience, level-two you listen to story from other person’s perspective).•  Listeners make a list of distinctions the storyteller makes in her/his story.•  If the listener is unsure what is meant by term, ask “What do you mean by <term>?”
  16. 16. Debrief
  17. 17. Speech Act Theory: How Language Works•  Speech acts: 5 different types.•  Can describe, promise, command, etc.•  Austin defined “illocutionary act:” –  Speaker says something. –  Means something by it. –  Tries to communicate what he means to hearer.•  Distinction between propositional content and force or type of the speech act.•  Examples: –  Please leave the room. –  Will you leave the room? –  You will leave the room. J.  L.  Aus(n  (1911-­‐1960)  
  18. 18. Speech Acts in Practice•  Speech Act: Speaker says something, means something, tries to communicate to another.•  5 “illocutionary” acts: –  Assertions: commit to truth –  Assessments: give opinion –  Requests: ask or direct to do –  Commitments: commit to do –  Declarations: cause to exist•  Consider confusion of assertions and assessments.
  19. 19. Assertions versus Assessments•  Assertions committed to the truth.•  Assessments committed to expressing an opinion.•  Contrast – It’s 60 degrees C outside (assertion). – It’s very hot (assessment). – If in doubt, it’s probably an assessment.•  Examples from audience.
  20. 20. Why is it useful to distinguish between assertions and assessments?
  21. 21. From Data  Judgment in 25 ms•  Set of things happen in an event.•  Our minds immediately interpret the facts and jump to conclusions.•  Lightening quick process.•  2 things: –  Conclusion drawn quickly: “He is an idiot.” –  Said with “certainty.” An assessment masquerades as an assertion.•  Distinguishing assessments & assertions critical to open discourse. Ladder  of  Inference  
  22. 22. 4 Ways to Invite Communication•  Real data is not the problem: Just the facts ma’am.•  4 tactics with assessments: –  Label. –  Support (grounded assessment). –  Lighten. –  Explicitly separate assertions & assessments. –  Hold assessments lightly (or get permission to give).•  4 examples –  “He is tall.”  “I believe he is tall” or “My assessment is that he is tall.” label –  “He is tall.” “He is relatively tall for men in this town.” support –  “He is tall.”  “He is tall, and I hold this assessment lightly.” label & lighten –  “He is tall.”  “May I offer you my assessment of his height?” request permission
  23. 23. Stories that Serve, Stories that Don’t•  All stories a combination of assertions and assessments: –  Assertions (if true) don’t change. –  Assessments subject to reframing, reevaluation, deletion, addition.•  Metaphor of underspecified data. How many lines can we fit through a straight line?•  Why not choose lines with good slopes?
  24. 24. What stories serve us? What stories don’t?
  25. 25. Common Stories That Hold Back•  2 stories: – Mommy/daddy story. If I get <X>, my mommy/daddy will love/appreciate me, and I will love myself. – Mr/Ms Perfect story. If got a bad <X>  I am a failure.
  26. 26. Enlarging Stories That Enhance/Advance•  Many ways to enhance stories and visual different future.•  One way is the impossibility framing.•  2 questions: – What impossible thing could we do that would make this awesome? – How do make the impossible possible?
  27. 27. Two Takeaways
  28. 28. For PresenceAwaken to the mystery of being here and enter the quiet immensity of your own presence.Have joy and peace in the temple of your senses.Receive encouragement when new frontiers beckon.Respond to the call of your gift and the courage to follow its path.Let the flame of anger free you of all falsity.May warmth of heart keep your presence aflame.May anxiety never linger about you.May your outer dignity mirror an inner dignity of soul.Take time to celebrate the quiet miracles that seek no attention.Be consoled in the secret symmetry of your soul.May you experience each day as a sacred gift woven around the heart of wonder.ODonohue,  John  (2008-­‐03-­‐04).  To  Bless  the  Space  Between  Us:  A  Book  of  Blessings  (p.  42).  Harmony.  Kindle  Edi(on.    
  29. 29. Stories, Success & YouAn Interactive Session in the Series Mastering the Missing Basics of EngineeringDavid E. GoldbergThreeJoy Associates, Inc., University of Illinois & NUSChampaign, IL 61821 USAdeg@threejoy.com
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