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Module 7 from Creative Modeling for Tech Visionaries: Napkintalk

Module 7 from Creative Modeling for Tech Visionaries: Napkintalk

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Napkintalk Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Creative Modeling for Technology Visionaries Qualitative & Simplified Quantitative Modeling for Product Creation Module 7: Napkintalk David E. Goldberg University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 [email_address]
  • 2. Engineering Creativity as Visual
    • Modern engineering education hung up on science and math.
    • Importance of language.
    • Much engineering creativity is visual.
    • Ability to think visually important in early stages of product development.
    • Visual thinking often key to category creation and enhancement.
  • 3. Roadmap
    • Napkintalk & napkinthink.
    • Ferguson’s distinction between engineer and artisan.
    • Learning to see & the mind’s eye.
    • Sketches: representation of what is or what should be.
    • Diagrams: representation of thoughts or abstractions and their relationships.
    • Quad charts: conceptual dimensions in 2D.
  • 4. Napkintalk
    • Napkintalk/think: 2 engineers in a restaurant.
    • Ode to the paper napkin: http://www.elecdesign.com/Articles/Index.cfm?AD=1&AD=1&ArticleID=4588
    • Napkin goes back and forth.
    • Deconstruct:
      • Social process.
      • Verbal exchange (dialectic).
      • Visual exchange of sketched images.
  • 5. Drawing as Distinction
    • Ferguson makes distinction between artisans and engineers on the basis of engineer’s drawing and artisan’s lack!
    • Design is a contingent process.
    • Visual thinking is important throughout.
    • Engineering education also involved shop classes.
    • Hands dirty & understood connection between drawings and things made.
  • 6. Short History of Demise of Drawing
    • World War2 mobilized engineers and scientists on war effort.
    • Led by engineer, Vannevar Bush.
    • The Endless Frontier created NSF and devaluation of visual thinking began.
    • Few electrical engineers or computer scientists take engineering graphics.
    • Other disciplines dropping it.
    • Sketching a lost art.
    Vannevar Bush (1890-1974)
  • 7. Why Visual Thinking Matters
    • Four good reasons:
      • Every pen stroke a creation.
      • Represent world as it is.
      • Create world that might be.
      • Enhance thought process by representing thoughts and relationships between them in pictures.
  • 8. Every Mark of Pen Creates
    • For most people, most common creative act is to put pen to paper.
    • Writing a word or sketching a figure creates something that did not exist.
    • By definition, a creative act.
    • Think of pens and pencils as creative tools.
    • Buy them, try different ones.
    • Find some favorites.
  • 9. Learning to See & Represent
    • Brains have become symbolically dominated, but need to get in touch with what is.
    • Drawing class a place to start.
    • Exercises from Betty Edwards.
  • 10. Upside Down Exercise
    • Take exercise sheet.
    • Half class right side up.
    • Half class up side down.
    • Take short period to draw line drawing.
    • No tracing.
  • 11. What’s the Point?
    • Upside down drawings tend to be better.
    • Less “symbol” thinking.
    • Good results after 5 days of training.
    • You can learn to see and draw what you see.
  • 12. More Typical Sketch
    • Useful ≠ work of art.
    • Engineers represent designs w/ sketches.
    • Convey conception or idea of invention.
    • Example Edison’s 1877 conception of the phonograph.
  • 13. Diagramming
    • Sketching is about representing things.
    • Diagramming is about representing concepts and their relationships.
    • What is being represented: people, activities, terms, concepts, combination?.
    • Prescriptive vs. descriptive vs. hybrid.
    • Form of representation: graph or other form.
    • People
      • Organizational chart
      • Social networks
    • Activities
      • Flow/process charts
      • Schedules
      • Systems dynamics
      • Fishbone
    • Ideas & terms
      • Orbits
      • Layers
      • Venn diagram
      • Semantic nets
      • Quadrants
      • Positioning diagrams
  • 14. Organizational Chart
    • Boxes represent roles & people.
    • Lines represent reporting relationship.
    • Generally hierarchical.
    • Prescriptive.
    East Bay Municipal Utility District
  • 15. Social Network
    • Who is links to whom in the blogosphere?
    • Other relationships.
    • Can move in quantitative direction here.
    • Descriptive.
  • 16. Flow Chart
    • Lays out procedure or process in step-by-step manner.
    • Activities & decisions.
    • Oftentimes simple linear process flow.
    • Can be prescriptive or descriptive.
  • 17. System Dynamics Diagram
    • Grew out of Jay Forester’s work.
    • Qualitative use of control theory.
    • Consider structure of feedback loops to think qualitatively about system response.
  • 18. System Dynamics Diagram Jay W. Forrester (b. 1918)
  • 19. Schedules
    • Types:
      • CPM: critical path methods.
      • PERT: program evaluation and review technique.
      • Gantt or bar chart: visual representation of schedule.
    • Precedence descriptive, timing prescriptive.
  • 20. PERT Chart
    • Arc as activity.
  • 21. Bar Chart or Gantt Chart
  • 22. Ishikawa or Fishbone Diagram
    • Look for root causes of difficulty.
    • Descriptive of problem difficulty.
    • Purpose: diagnosis & prevention.
    • Quality management keen on visual representation.
  • 23. Orbit Diagrams
    • Inside to outside.
    • Drawn wrt insider.
    • Example: DISCUS.
    • Prescriptive.
  • 24. Venn Diagram
    • Explicit representation of overlap or intersection.
    • John Venn introduced 1881.
    VennDiagram.ppt Link to image
  • 25. Architectural Layers
  • 26. Back to Aristotelian Data Mining
    • Have different dimensions of product/customer/org space from ADM.
    • Consider theory or experiments in two or more dimensions at a time.
    • Types:
      • Quadrants
      • Positioning diagrams
      • Radar diagrams
  • 27. Quad Chart
  • 28. Stokes Quadrants
    • D. E. Stokes (1997). Pasteur's Quadrant: Basic Science and Technological Innovation. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.
  • 29. Positioning Diagram
    • From discrete to continuous.
    • Often used in marketing to explore notion of niche.
    • Un- or under-exploited market opportunities.
    Econobox Luxury Price Conservative Sporty Lifestyle American Family Sedans German Sports Sedans
  • 30. Radar Diagram
    • Multiple dimensions.
    • Useful to measure wrt ideal.
    • Quality example.
    • Point in n-space represented by pattern.
    http://www.mmo.org.tr/endustrimuhendisligi/2003_3/a_field_studyofmeasuring_dosyalar/image008.gif
  • 31. Bottom Line
    • Visual thinking is a companion to verbal thinking for the engineer.
    • Perhaps even more central to engineering thought.
    • Sketching to learn to see & invent.
    • Diagramming to relate concepts.
    • Variety of ways to do.
    • Quadrants tie verbal dimensions to the visual.