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Beyond the Buzz: Designing a MOOC for behavior change
 

Beyond the Buzz: Designing a MOOC for behavior change

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Slides used at the presentation given at Online Learning 2013 - Chicago on Sept 18, 2013. Tips we share based on our LeaderMOOC experience.

Slides used at the presentation given at Online Learning 2013 - Chicago on Sept 18, 2013. Tips we share based on our LeaderMOOC experience.

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  • Two problems: when talking about MOOCs we need to be on the same page before we start talking otherwise we spend half the session defining what we are talking about, and two: itis one of these things you need to have seen or done to fully grasp
  • 5 minutes talk with neighbours:Talking points: it is a loose term, news and updates (handout?)
  • Participated, not necessarily completed
  • Talking points: high ambitions, project from scratch (new design, not repurpose existing class courses), (small) behavior change (can it be done), not pure in any sense (it is a laboratory for us, conclusions in December),
  • There is a structure and weekly topics.
  • Module structure as the ‘fixed yellow path’, lot of people want clear structure, even expect clear deadlines etc.People track their progress on ‘what they must do’.
  • Videos and readings – a familiar face (this is not about the star professor) – host priinciple at the start and ending of module to introduce and bring it all together
  • Of course there are also discussions – we include about 3 in the ‘path’ a week, but many spontaneous discussions start.
  • Every week ends with ‘making it real’, going to applications, having some small tips to try out that week.And the Roadmap: two questions per week, one on insights, one on little goals, peer reviewed.
  • Upselling experiment: can we find a sustainable business model?Also give-away of the week.
  • And never forget the people side.
  • Don’t underestimate what it will take. This is a ‘passion project’.
  • Peer to peer aspect9- It's all about communityWe have talked before on how you need to make up your mind on what's a MOOC to you. If it is about broadcasting your expertise, this section will not be relevant to you. But if you agree with the original terms of MOOC and the 'M' to be massive enough for network effects and network learning to occur it means that the community is the keystone of the MOOC?Inge talked with me in great detail about the community aspect. It doesn't just happen. She has spend a lot of time facilitating the community and with great success in her MobiMOOCs. And of course trust is the foundation of a community to work. Here are a few observations and suggestions:Ultimately the success of a MOOC is in its community of participants - so it is crucial to build the community in the first weeks of the MOOC, especially if you know the dropout trends. A 'stable', core community will have formed after a few weeks, and people may drift into their own sub-networks within the MOOC based on interest or location. So include a few community building assignments and icebreakers and fun assignments in the first weeks of the MOOC. If the community doesn't form and if the trusted learning platform isn't created in those weeks, it will hamper knowledge sharing and creation.To do this well, it requires a lot of facilitation time. Probably your MOOC is global, so this might require a facilitation 'shift' to cover all timezones, eg 3 facilitators around the world.When facilitators personally contact people who started strong but dropped out or reduced their activity, it brings back quite a few people.Facilitators have power, whether they are aware of that or not. Facilitators shape the MOOCs direction by ignoring certain discussions or giving attention to others. Because the community aspect of the MOOC is so important, Chris recommends we favor a social platform over a content-centric platform like a traditional LMS.Inge also gave some advice on dealing with 'the dark side' of the community, eg when a handful of people start flaming, use inappropriate language, disrespect the MOOC terms, self-advertising, spamming, etc. Her method is threefold : first a personal warning, then a public one in the forums, and if that doesn't help a ban.And community can be face-to-face too. A lot of MOOCs encourage people to set up meetups in their town or local starbucks to discuss the course or do assignments together.
  • People can and will drift off.Vote with their feet. Think of it as normal: if we didn’t force people to stay, and didn’t put up barriers to leave, and didn’t control the in-flow this would be normal in class as well.

Beyond the Buzz: Designing a MOOC for behavior change Beyond the Buzz: Designing a MOOC for behavior change Presentation Transcript

  • Beyond the Buzz: Designing a MOOC for behavior change by Bert De Coutere from the Center for Creative Leadership for the Online Learning 2013 conference in Chicago
  • Nice to meet you! Bert De Coutere lives in Belgium, works for the Center for Creative Leadership, blogs on homocompetens.blogspot.com and is one third of the core team behind LeaderMOOC.net.
  • What I promised to talk about • About the major design decisions and criteria when organizing a MOOC aimed at behavior change • To evaluate various technological alternatives • To design a blueprint of an in-company MOOC Case LeaderMOOC: A MOOC outside of higher education, in the field of leadership development – currently in week 1.
  • HAVE YOU LOOKED AT MOOCS IN THE LAST 24 HOURS? Here a MOOC, there a MOOC, everywhere a MOOC MOOC
  • What’s MOOC to you? Source: http://www.dashe.com/blog/elearning/reasons-moocs-will-change-world/
  • THE EARLY DAYS OF LEADERMOOC Seeing is believing
  • M FOR MASSIVE AMOUNT OF WORK And now the real stuff Tip 1: Find your incubator protective bubble – this is still innovation
  • Make a pick Discovery Phase Tip 2: Start with everything you know about online learning Who are you designing for? Tip 3: Create personas but remain ‘open’ Platform and technicalities Tip 4: Don’t do it yourself, use an existing platform Blueprint Tip 5: Create a simple, repeated structure and weekly topics in a matrix form Business models Tip 6: There are no established business models yet – get sponsors for your first one Community Tip 7: Build in interaction early and often. If you ignore your course, so will your participants.
  • Discovery Phase Tip 2: Start with everything you know about online learning "The idea of a MOOC is not so new, only the scale is different.“ (Inge de Waard)
  • Who are you designing for? Tip 3: Create personas but remain ‘open’
  • • Key question for platform choice: Is your MOOC mostly about content or about people? • One window to the MOOC or mashup? Platform and technicalities Tip 4: Don’t do it yourself, use an existing platform
  • Blueprint Tip 5: Create a simple, repeated structure and weekly topics in a matrix form There is a beginning, there is an end. What’s the end?
  • Business models Tip 6: There are no established business models yet – get sponsors for your first one The elephant in the room: Will it eat our sales?
  • Community Tip 7: Build in interaction early and often. If you ignore your course, so will your participants.
  • The most important lessons I learned so far Mindset Tip 8: It is not about you, it is about them...
  • MORE: “BEHIND THE MOOC” ARTICLE SERIES homocompetens.blogspot.com
  • Shameless promotion of our MOOC www.leadermooc.net MOOCs are one of those things you just need to do to understand.
  • OK, let’s talk now...