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Pecha kucha -"Small Changes, Big Effect"
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Pecha kucha -"Small Changes, Big Effect"

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Deb Sovinee and Lynn Baum. This was for a Pecha Kucha Night at the New England Museum Association conference: 20 slides for only 20 seconds each, slides advance automatically.

Deb Sovinee and Lynn Baum. This was for a Pecha Kucha Night at the New England Museum Association conference: 20 slides for only 20 seconds each, slides advance automatically.

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  • \n
  • Last year I visited the Apartheid museum in South Africa. From this slide the design of the entrance gives us the impression of entering a subway or some other dark place. The brick wall and metal turnstiles are devoid of direction, telling us nothing about what to expect once we go inside. \n\n\n
  • With the addition of just a couple of words above each door the experience changes completely. Entering the museum now becomes a personal and emotional experience. We have to choose an entrance, being forced to participate in a divisive sorting system – setting the stage for what is to come inside.\n\n
  • A long empty wall can pose all kinds of design challenges. How should the space be divided? How do we want to direct the eye? How do we make it feel like a cohesive grouping instead of a set of scattered images? In this example the wall is not connected to the rest of the room.\n\n
  • With attention to size, color and space, a large expanse can become a focal point and a way to tie the entire space together. The grouping actually now includes the furniture beneath it, creating a cohesive unit. The eye can focus on the photographs as a group, and enables each image to stand out more easily.\n
  • Creating an exhibit icon without using any words can be a great way to capture attention, but it needs to be done carefully so that key points are emphasized.\nHere, a young girl is ready to demonstrate Galileo’s famous ball drop experiment under the watchful eye of her mom. To understand the law of physics that is being presented it is important to notice that there are two balls of different sizes in the girl’s hands. Not very obvious….\n\n
  • Without noticing the difference between those two balls the point of the sculpture is lost. A little bit of color goes a long way against the gray bodies. Now the visual point is much more obvious – two balls of different sizes, when dropped from the same height will land at the same time\n
  • A workshop designed to get girls excited about science. Using collections, the girls began by creating exhibits and labels. First draft labels - not so exciting with white file cards and ball point pens.\n\n
  • The treat comes in the form of color. For the final label the girls were offered a variety of gel pens in many hues and day-glo file cards to help them get their words across. The level of excitement rose as they chose their pens and cards – each selection saying something about themselves and their work.\n
  • A familiar site– the drain-pipe or downspout. We see them stuck on the sides and corners of all kinds of structures. Its function is important but we often try to hide its presence by blending it into a building. \n\n
  • What if we put it in the spotlight? Mundane off-the-shelf chain changes the look from functional to art, creating the effect of a waterfall as rain flows through. In this example the rain runs into a trough that recycles the collected water for this roof-top garden at a civic center.\n\n
  • A stand-alone activity in an exhibit called “ Making Models” asks visitors to select a topic and draw it. The challenge was to find a medium that was manageable for visitors and that required very little maintenance from staff. The first attempt – pipe cleaners did not measure up. They were difficult to use and messy to maintain\n
  • A second attempt simplified the activity with the use of magnet boards and metal bead chains. Cutting off the ends of the beads allowed visitors to create all kinds of pictures and discouraged anyone from walking away with them. The end result – easy to maintain and fun!\n
  • Traditional dioramas have always had appeal. Creating a small slice of the world with careful detail can be fascinating to observe. But they are a totally visually experience, limiting to many\n
  • By adding touch, sound and scents the experience becomes richer for everyone. These dioramas at the Museum of Science in Boston provides access to all visitors regardless of any physical or learning limitations. \n
  • We now have a feast of fonts at our disposal . How do we choose?\nWe can affect the impact of what we write without changing a word. The fonts we chose become the voice we want to match our words. But, which voice? Serious? Confident? or Humorous? \n\n
  • Working with middle school children to create panels for a garden exhibit on bio- diversity led to a discussion about universal design. The students were very proud of their work – they had spent quite a bit a time laying out their ideas in a very colorful array.\nThe problem; many of us, including those with older eyes, were straining to read it.\n\n
  • Working with middle school children to create panels for a garden exhibit on bio- diversity led to a discussion about universal design. The students were very proud of their work – they had spent quite a bit a time laying out their ideas in a very colorful array.\nThe problem; many of us, including those with older eyes, were straining to read it.\n
  • Functional and ubiquitous – words that describe lots of things we come across in our daily lives. Often these are items we never even see – a styrene cup, can be just one more piece of trash, and not a particularly compostable one at that.\n
  • But with a different eye suddenly the potential to create a piece a small piece of art appears. Delicate carvings create intricate faces and suddenly the mundane and tossed aside becomes a work of art. \n
  • Sometimes what we do not notice makes all the difference. Just a couple of letters out of place created a huge change in the meaning of a key label for a collections-based exhibit. The mistake was eventually corrected although there are still some who think it is exactly what the curator intended….\n\n

Pecha kucha -"Small Changes, Big Effect" Pecha kucha -"Small Changes, Big Effect" Presentation Transcript

  • Deborah Sovinee and Lynn Baum
  • Last year I visited the Apartheid museum in South Africa. From this slide the design of theentrance gives us the impression of entering a subway or some other dark place. The brickwall and metal turnstiles are devoid of direction, telling us nothing about what to expect oncewe go inside.
  • With the addition of just a couple of words above each door the experience changescompletely. Entering the museum now becomes a personal and emotional experience. Wehave to choose an entrance, being forced to participate in a divisive sorting system – settingthe stage for what is to come inside.
  • A long empty wall can pose all kinds of design challenges. How should the space be divided?How do we want to direct the eye? How do we make it feel like a cohesive grouping instead ofa set of scattered images? In this example the wall is not connected to the rest of the room.
  • With attention to size, color and space, a large expanse can become a focal point and a way totie the entire space together. The grouping actually now includes the furniture beneath it,creating a cohesive unit. The eye can focus on the photographs as a group, and enables eachimage to stand out more easily.
  • Creating an exhibit icon without using any words can be a great way to capture attention, butit needs to be done carefully so that key points are emphasized.Here, a young girl is ready to demonstrate Galileo’s famous ball drop experiment under thewatchful eye of her mom. To understand the law of physics that is being presented it isimportant to notice that there are two balls of different sizes in the girl’s hands.
  • Without noticing the difference between those two balls the point of the sculpture is lost. Alittle bit of color goes a long way against the gray bodies. Now the visual point is much moreobvious – two balls of different sizes, when dropped from the same height will land at the sametime
  • A workshop designed to get girls excited about science. Using collections, the girls began bycreating exhibits and labels. First draft labels - not so exciting with white file cards and ballpoint pens.
  • The treat comes in the form of color. For the final label the girls were offered a variety of gelpens in many hues and day-glo file cards to help them get their words across. The level ofexcitement rose as they chose their pens and cards – each selection saying something aboutthemselves and their work.
  • A familiar site– the drain-pipe or downspout. We see them stuck on the sides and corners of allkinds of structures. Its function is important but we often try to hide its presence by blendingit into a building.
  • What if we put it in the spotlight? Mundane off-the-shelf chain changes the look fromfunctional to art, creating the effect of a waterfall as rain flows through. In this example therain runs into a trough that recycles the collected water for this roof-top garden at a civiccenter.
  • A stand-alone activity in an exhibit called “ Making Models” asks visitors to select a topic anddraw it. The challenge was to find a medium that was manageable for visitors and thatrequired very little maintenance from staff. The first attempt – pipe cleaners did not measureup. They were difficult to use and messy to maintain
  • A second attempt simplified the activity with the use of magnet boards and metal bead chains.Cutting off the ends of the beads allowed visitors to create all kinds of pictures anddiscouraged anyone from walking away with them. The end result – easy to maintain and fun!
  • Traditional dioramas have always had appeal. Creating a small slice of the world with carefuldetail can be fascinating to observe. But they are a totally visually experience, limiting tomany
  • By adding touch, sound and scents the experience becomes richer for everyone. Thesedioramas at the Museum of Science in Boston provides access to all visitors regardless of anyphysical or learning limitations.
  • We now have a feast of fonts at our disposal . How do we choose?We can affect the impact of what we write without changing a word. The fonts we chosebecome the voice we want to match our words. But, which voice? Serious? Confident? orHumorous?
  • Working with middle school children to create panels for a garden exhibit on bio- diversity ledto a discussion about universal design. The students were very proud of their work – they hadspent quite a bit a time laying out their ideas in a very colorful array.The problem; many of us, including those with older eyes, were straining to read it.
  • Working with middle school children to create panels for a garden exhibit on bio- diversity ledto a discussion about universal design. The students were very proud of their work – they hadspent quite a bit a time laying out their ideas in a very colorful array.The problem; many of us, including those with older eyes, were straining to read it.
  • Functional and ubiquitous – words that describe lots of things we come across in our dailylives. Often these are items we never even see – a styrene cup, can be just one more piece oftrash, and not a particularly compostable one at that.
  • But with a different eye suddenly the potential to create a piece a small piece of art appears.Delicate carvings create intricate faces and suddenly the mundane and tossed aside becomesa work of art.
  • Sometimes what we do not notice makes all the difference. Just a couple of letters out of place created a huge change in the meaning of a key label for a collections-based exhibit.The mistake was eventually corrected although there are still some who think it is exactly what the curator intended….