UNIVERSAL DESIGN: MORE THAN WHAT MEETS THE EYE

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My explanation of what universal design is and how it is used in museums and elsewhere.

My explanation of what universal design is and how it is used in museums and elsewhere.

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  • 1. UNIVERSAL DESIGN: MORE THAN WHATMEETS THE EYEDEBORAH SOVINEE
  • 2. CURB CUT DESIGN - DEB’S STORYWHAT WASOSTENSIBLY DESIGNEDFOR ONE PARTICULARGROUP IN THEPOPULATION WORKSFOR EVERYONE.
  • 3. UNIVERSALDESIGN:DEFINITIONSUNIVERSAL DESIGN MEANSSIMPLY DESIGNING ALLPRODUCTS, BUILDINGS,SPACES, AND EDUCATIONALELEMENTS TO BE USABLEBYALL PEOPLE TO THEGREATEST POSSIBLE EXTENT.
  • 4. PRINCIPLES OF UNIVERSAL DESIGN3471 25Use of the design is easy to understand,regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge,language skills, or current concentration level.1a. Provide the same means of use for all users:identical whenever possible; equivalent when not.1b. Avoid segregating or stigmatizing any users.1c. Make provisions for privacy, security, and safetyequally available to all users.1d. Make the design appealing to all users.Power doors with sensors at entrances that areconvenient for all usersIntegrated, dispersed, and adaptable seating inassembly areas such as sports arenas and theatersBettye Rose Connell, Mike Jones,Ron Mace, Jim Mueller,Abir Mullick, Elaine Ostroff,Jon Sanford,Ed Steinfeld, Molly Story,and Gregg Vanderheiden.GUIDELINESThe design is useful and marketable to peoplewith diverse abilities.7a. Provide a clear line of sight to important elementsfor any seated or standing user.7b. Make reach to all components comfortable for anyseated or standing user.7c. Accommodate variations in hand and grip size.7d. Provide adequate space for the use of assistivedevices or personal assistance.Controls on the front and clear floor space aroundappliances, mailboxes, dumpsters, and other elementsWide gates at subway stations that accommodate all usersGUIDELINESAppropriate size and space is provided for approach,reach, manipulation, and use regardless of user’sbody size, posture, or mobility.4a. Use different modes (pictorial, verbal, tactile)for redundant presentation of essential information.4b. Maximize “legibility” of essential information.4c. Differentiate elements in ways that can bedescribed (i.e., make it easy to give instructionsor directions).4d. Provide compatibility with a variety of techniquesor devices used by people with sensory limitations.Tactile, visual, and audible cues and instructionson a thermostatRedundant cueing (e.g., voice communications andsignage) in airports, train stations, and subway carsGUIDELINESThe design communicates necessary informationeffectively to the user, regardless of ambientconditions or the user’s sensory abilities.5a. Arrange elements to minimize hazards and errors:most used elements, most accessible; hazardouselements eliminated, isolated, or shielded.5b. Provide warnings of hazards and errors.5c. Provide fail safe features.5d. Discourage unconscious action in tasks thatrequire vigilance.A double-cut car key easily inserted into a recessedkeyhole in either of two waysAn “undo” feature in computer software that allowsthe user to correct mistakes without penaltyGUIDELINESThe design minimizes hazards and the adverseconsequences of accidental or unintended actions.2a. Provide choice in methods of use.2b. Accommodate right-or left-handed access and use.2c. Facilitate the user’s accuracy and precision.2d. Provide adaptability to the user’s pace.Scissors designed for right -or left-handed usersAn automated teller machine (ATM) that has visual,tactile, and audible feedback, a tapered cardopening, and a palm restGUIDELINESThe design accommodates a wide range ofindividual preferences and abilities.GUIDELINES66a. Allow user to maintain a neutral body position.6b. Use reasonable operating forces.6c. Minimize repetitive actions.6d. Minimize sustained physical effort.Lever or loop handles on doors and faucetsTouch lamps operated without a switchGUIDELINESEXAMPLESEXAMPLESEXAMPLESEXAMPLESEXAMPLESEXAMPLESEXAMPLESEQUITABLE USE PERCEPTIBLE INFORMATIONTOLERANCE FOR ERRORFLEXIBILITY IN USE SIMPLE AND INTUITIVE USELOW PHYSICAL EFFORTThe design can be used efficiently and comfortablyand with a minimum of fatigue.THE PRINCIPLES WERE COMPILED BY ADVOCATESOF UNIVERSAL DESIGN, IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER:THE PRINCIPLES OF UNIVERSAL DESIGNVersion 2.0 (4/1/97)The Principles of Universal Design are not intended toconstitute all criteria for good design, only universallyusable design. Certainly, other factors are important,such as aesthetics, cost, safety, gender and culturalappropriateness, and these aspects must also betaken into consideration when designing.NOTE:3a. Eliminate unnecessary complexity.3b. Be consistent with user expectations and intuition.3c. Accommodate a wide range of literacy andlanguage skills.3d. Arrange information consistent with its importance.3e. Provide effective prompting and feedbackduring and after task completion.A moving sidewalk or escalator in a public spaceAn instruction manual with drawings and no textSIZE AND SPACE FORAPPROACH AND USE12 34765© Copyright 1997 NC State University,Center for Universal Design, College of Design
  • 5. UNIVERSAL DESIGN IS MORE THAN WHEELCHAIR RAMPS, ITINCLUDES USING ALL THE SENSES , AND MULTI-MODALLEARNING STYLES
  • 6. UNIVERSAL DESIGN IN MUSEUMS:HEAR, TOUCH, SMELL, TASTE, SEE
  • 7. AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE IS ACCESSIBLE, TOUCHABLE, ANDTHEREFORE BETTER FOR EVERYONE
  • 8. WHAT TO CONSIDERCAN YOU REACH IT?CAN YOU FIND IT?CAN YOU GET TO IT?CAN YOU SEE IT? ORHEAR IT?IS IT SAFE?
  • 9. WHO’S AN ACCESSIBILITY EXPERT?BRAILLE - IT ONLY COMES IN ONE FONT SIZE, WHICH YOU’DKNOW IF YOU WERE BLIND.
  • 10. NEW ENGLAND LIFE ZONESTHE ADDITIONS TO THIS DIORAMA INCLUDE SMELL, TOUCH, AND SOUND(MULTI-SENSORY AND MULTI-MODAL). VISITORS WITH WIDELY RANGINGABILITIES, LEVELS OF INTEREST, SOPHISTICATION AND CULTURAL IDENTITIESCAN ACCESS THE EXHIBIT’S MESSAGE AND HAVE FUN DOING IT.
  • 11. MODEL USED TO DESCRIBE DEPTHPROTOTYPE - STRING IS UNWOUND SO VISITOR, BLIND OR NOT,CAN MEASURE. THE FINAL DESIGN WAS SPRING-LOADED ANDRETRACTABLE.
  • 12. MAKING MODELS - DRAWINGACTIVITYHOW DO YOUENCOURAGE CROWDSOF PEOPLE TO DRAWWITHOUT:USING PENCILS, PAPER,AND SHARPENERSMARKERSCHALKBOARDS ANDERASERSCRAYONS
  • 13. MAGNET BOARDPROTOTYPE, ITERATIONS, AND ACCESSIBLE FINAL DESIGN
  • 14. “NATURAL MYSTERIES”A CASE STUDY
  • 15. EXHIBIT AREAS INCLUDING TABLE TOPS, ENTRANCES AND ALLINTERACTIVES WERE DESIGNED TO BE WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE
  • 16. “NATURAL MYSTERIES” SKULLINTERACTIVEOBJECTS ARE TOUCHABLE -EITHER ACTUAL SKULLSOR FACSIMILESLARGE BUTTONS FORCOMPUTERS USABLE WITHALL TYPES OF MOTORSKILLSSPEAKER SUPPLIES AUDIO,AND SCRIPT PROMPTSVISITOROBJECTS ARE PLACEDTOWARDS THE FRONT ANDON AN OVERHANG
  • 17. “NATURAL MYSTERIES”SNOWFLAKE INTERACTIVESNOWFLAKES ARETOUCHABLE ANDNUMBEREDLARGE BUTTONS ANDAUDIO PROMPTS HELPVISITORS THROUGHCOMPUTER PROGRAMROOM FORWHEELCHAIR
  • 18. TRADITIONAL DIORAMA WITH ACCESSIBLEADDITIONSA TOUCHABLE SKULL AND SOUND WERE ADDED
  • 19. NEW ENGLAND HABITATNOTE “HEARPHONE” ON WALL, SPEAKER OVER SKULL EXHIBIT,TOUCHABLE GAME BOARD FRONT RIGHT, MOVABLE STOOLS,TOUCHABLE ROCK WALL
  • 20. SHELL GAMETOUCHABLE - SOME FRAGILE SHELLS THAT CAN’T BE TOUCHED,BUT A BLIND VISITOR CAN STILL PLAY.
  • 21. MAKE YOUR OWN MUSEUMVISITORS MAKE THEIR OWN THEMED DISPLAYS USING OBJECTSAND A CHALKBOARD
  • 22. CLASSIFICATIONTOUCHABLE OBJECTSARE PARTIALLYIMBEDDED IN CLEARRESIN
  • 23. OPEN COLLECTIONDRAWERS ARE WHEELCHAIR HEIGHT, LIGHT UP WHEN OPENED,AND EACH DRAWER CONTAINS ONE REPRESENTATIVETOUCHABLE OBJECT.
  • 24. CONCLUSIONS - WHAT TO THINKABOUTWAYFINDINGLIGHTINGSIGNAGE -PLACEMENT,FONT SIZE, CONTRASTREACHEASE OF USEMULTI-SENSORY ANDMULTI-MODAL -