The Role of Librarians in DAM and inYour Organization: Broadening Your Existing Skill Set  Createasphere Digital Asset Man...
“Modern civilization will not collapse from a lack ofresources or a war--it will collapse from the crushof information. I ...
Two Case Studies                              Exploratorium                              Pacific   Energy               ...
Exploratorium                          Science, Art and                           Human Perception                       ...
EDAMExploratorium Digital Asset Management                                IMLS funded                                200...
Audiences                            Educators                            Museum Partners                            Co...
Departments                                Media Production                                 and Marketing                ...
Central vs. Departmental Catalogs                                Central: best quality, both                             ...
Conceptual Framework Categories / Keywords                                By Audience                                By ...
Field Structure                                Asset Creator                                Other Contributor           ...
Dissemination                         Internal Network                         External WebBrine Shrimp Ballet          ...
CopyrightSolar Eclipse Sun’s Corona       Image by A. Snyder                             12
Challenges                         Took a long time to                          get started                         Proc...
More Challenges                                     Physical organization of                                      assets ...
Solutions                            Have patience with                             territorial feelings -new            ...
Pleasant Surprises                                Popularity of the digital                                 assets with s...
More Surprises                          New resources to                           come out of project                   ...
Hidden Treasures                           Paul Doherty Collection                           Staff scientist’s          ...
Letting Go                           What’s lost is lost                           Prevent future loss Air RingsImage by...
Looking Forward                               More customization                                to external audience     ...
Exploratorium Digital Libraryhttp://www.exploratorium.edu/digital_library/                        Asset Archive          ...
Pacific Energy Center                  Seeking DAM                   solution                  Many formats             ...
Those DAM Librarians!   Know audiences – who they are, what they look    for and how   Expertise in building metadata sc...
Those DAM Librarians!   Know how to organize information and assets for    findability   Generally they are viewed as ne...
Thank you and be in touch! dhunt@information-edge.com http://www.information-edge.com http://www.information-edge.com/i...
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The Role of Librarians in DAM and in Your Organization, Createasphere 2012

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From knowledge to information to metadata in your DAM, the role of the librarian is often neglected. Our two experts will give you examples of why librarians are important to your DAM and your organization. We will look at differing non-profit and for-profit perspectives on the role of the librarian.

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  • I’m going to concentrate on twocase studies that exemplify the role librarians play in DAM projects and success.
  • The Exploratorium is known for hands-on science and in 2009 celebrated its 40th anniversary. As you can imagine there are assets in all sorts of formats and in every condition, from hi-8 tapes to 35mm slides and everything in between.
  • The EDAM project was initially funded from 2001-2003 by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency. There were 2 librarians and one publications department staff who worked on this project with some help from a system administrator. Currently, there is one librarian and one assistant on this project. Why were librarians chosen to lead on this project? There is a library or learning commons at the museum, but these two librarians did not staff the learning commons, and were involved in many projects from fostering international online educator communities, partnering with other museums on nanoscience, youth initiatives and much more. Their job title was Senior Information Specialist and the museum recognized the valuable skills and connections they brought to projects. The librarians did a needs assessment and based on that, created the criteria for selecting a software solution and then went through the process of RFIs and reviewing them, finally settling on Canto Cumulus, later adding the Modula4 Web Module and Video Module.
  • These two senior information specialists had worked with and recognized the needs of audiences who would utilize these assets and the context for that usage. They also had many years of combined work at the museum and knew how users looked for information and often, didn’t find it.
  • Like any DAM project, we needed to manage it and prioritize what would be digitized and indexed first. One of the largest collections was the slide library in the Photography Department. They have over 40,000 slides. The status quo had been that the slides were stored in plastic 35mm slide sleeves inside binders, organized mostly by year. These binders were in an unlocked room --- really a large closet and when anyone in the museum wanted a slide, they could just go in, spend a LOT of time looking for a slide and then take it away. Of course, there were two problems:-there were no finding aids, other than year, to get what was needed-often the slides never made it back to their bindersIn the teacher PD programs, there are some very prolific staff photographers who capture images --- everything from Burning Man science to why there are oil stains on the freeway in a particular spot. (Answer: there is a bump in the roadbed.)And, of course, we had thousands of images, plans, etc. from exhibit services that were both in print and digital. The print ones were in filing cabinets in the front office or scattered around in museum departments, but anyone could go into those files and take them. Just like the slides, much did not come back.
  • As in any organization, there were digital shared folders and files on hard-drives, with no filename standards, no taxonomy, nor anything much in the way of organization for retrieval and duplicate detection. There were all types of formats, resolutions, assets we owned and did not own, and more. And, there was much in print as well scattered all over the museum.We decided to organize on two levels: a central catalog and departmental ones.
  • Librarians and info pros have expertise in building metadata schema, taxonomies, and more. They understand how users and potential users look for information and the value that finding information brings to an organization. Here is the framework we began with as we built out the project.
  • Here is sample of the metadata schema, which is based on Dublin Core. As librarians, we understand just what it takes to best describe an asset to make it findable. And, we had been at the museum long enough, working on many projects with many departments that we were able to collaborate with them to tickle out just what would work best.
  • The Exploratorium has two access points: desktop client licenses for staff who use the system a lot and a web interface for light staff users and the public. The assets are available free to educators for noncommercial use at 72 dpi. They can search, select and download digital files.Commercial use is strictly prohibited without permission.
  • Copyright is an area that librarians are well versed in. As an example, one of my clients, a global architectural firm, had 2.5 FTEs working on indexing their assets into Cumulus. As you can imagine, there were a lot of them – some 30,000 when I worked with them 4 years ago. But, they had not pushed out the desktop client to staff (except for 3 users) and no one liked the web interface so it wasn’t used. Instead, their staff were searching Google to come up with images for proposals and reports, which could have been copyrighted, while not utilizing their own treasure-trove of original images. One of the first things I did on this project was recommend that desktop client licenses be purchased for several more staff as a trial. The CEO even used it. They were so impressed with the upswing in usage of their own digital assets, that they purchased the desktop client for most staff. The CEO told me that my recommendation on that alone saved them from possible litigation and liability. I did a lot more with them on that project, but the CEO recognized my value as a consultant and info pro.
  • Another thing librarians understand is that this kind of project takes time to get off on the right foot – developing the metadata schema, creating and testing the taxonomy, finding the right software solution, setting up workflows, etc. Librarians have extensive experience and expertise organizing assets of all kinds and know that you get out of a record, what you put into it. If you don’t index it right, it won’t be findable.And, we spent a lot of time up front on infrastructure, but it ended up being well worth it.
  • Librarians are pros at these challenges.We know how to organize information and assets for findability.Generally we are viewed as neutral working for the good of the entire organization. With the big picture view, we are able to prioritize what needs to be indexed first and why. And, we are able to create intellectual property policies that include copyright.
  • Librarians provide solutions, again in a way that overarches territoriality. They know to start small and let the success of a DAM project speak for itself. Both the librarians were experienced trainers and users felt comfortable asking them for help. Librarians are also very good at documenting processes and policies, which come in handy when questions arise, and questions will arise.Remember those 40,000 + slides I mentioned at the beginning of my presentation? Well, the Photography staff really didn’t want those slides to go out for scanning. They were afraid the slides would get lost or damaged. But, they trusted us and let us take a sampling of slides. Once they saw that they could lock that closet, protect the originals, and easily find the digital slides in many resolutions, they became our marketing team. When word got out about this project, other departments lined up to get their assets indexed next.
  • And now, these assets are easily accessible and findable for staff and the general public as part of the Exploratorium Digital Library. As I mentioned before, the lo-res images are available free for educational use. Commercial use is strictly prohibited without permission.And, the biggest surprise was this last bullet point. Staff felt comfortable asking these librarians if their assets could be included and appropriate ones are.
  • And because the librarians have connections across most departments in the museum, these resources is being developed.
  • Paul had this great collection, but it wasn’t organized or available to educators. It has become a highly used part of the collection. Paul had a good relationship with the librarians and trusted them to preserve his collection and make it available to others as well as organized for his own use.
  • Librarians are often perceived as the keepers of old data. That’s an old stereotype. But in the case of digital assets, it is important to not let things go before they are indexed and saved digitally. Several years ago, when the museum rented extra office space in the Presidio, the Graphics Department threw out beautiful old posters from past museum exhibitions and events. No one thought to save them and the technology wasn’t available to digitize them at the time.
  • This project just got off the ground in January. The PEC is a nonprofit arm or PG&E, a large public utilities company in Northern California. Staff use images for workshops and to publicize these workshops online and in print brochures. As is often the case, images are scattered all over on hard-drives and on a shared drive. i.e. there is no database or organizational system in place. Staff troll around folders which they think may have the image(s) they need, wasting valuable time. The number of assets is currently unknown, but likely in the thousands rather than tens of thousands. There are internally created images, but also many that staff have downloaded and these may have copyright restrictions on them. Workflow is very simple: The client needs the ability for staff to add simple metadata, such as title, date, keywords, author/creator, etc. to digital documents as they are saved into the system so that a librarian indexer/cataloger can then use this information to fully catalog each image. Better yet would be for metadata to be added on the fly (e.g. doc type, size, date of creation, etc.) that could be added to or modified by staff as they enter assets into the system for full cataloging. (We envision staff doing basic indexing and then every two weeks or so, a librarian indexer/cataloger would review what has been added and supplement indexing as needed.)I will work with the current taxonomy to refine and expand as necessary. Again the client recognizes the need for a librarian to build the taxonomy and metadata schema and to vet the metadata entered by staff as well as to come in and fully index content.Where this project stands: I am in the midst of reviewing returned RFIs in order to determine the best fit for the PEC and its staff. I will narrow down the field to 3-4 finalists, write up a executive summary (with supporting documents) and present to the client for review and discussion before we move on to demos and trials. [What is a heliodon? Aka as “sun machines”; provide an effective tool for the visualization and calculation of solar effects at the window, building, or site scale which identifiesopportunities for energy savings through climate-responsive architectural design.]
  • Just so you know, sadlyI do not tell most of my clients I have a Masters in Library Science degree as I find that limits their perception of what I bring to the table and how Information Edge can empower them to refind and reuse their content. I’m usually well into a project before I tell them. They are often shocked to learn this. Information professionals are working hard to reshape the librarian stereotype with the amazing expertise and value they bring to DAM and other projects.
  • Librarians have great project management skills that enable them to look at the different uses of a collection, potential audiences, and customization for different audiences. They bring a value-added sense of the worth of what a collection can be if it is indexed, findable and usable. They’ve wrangled both structured and unstructured data and understand the challenges in doing that. They make sure one’s DAM house is in order.
  • The Role of Librarians in DAM and in Your Organization, Createasphere 2012

    1. 1. The Role of Librarians in DAM and inYour Organization: Broadening Your Existing Skill Set Createasphere Digital Asset Management Conference February 22, 2012 Deb Hunt, ECMp, MLS Information Edge 1
    2. 2. “Modern civilization will not collapse from a lack ofresources or a war--it will collapse from the crushof information. I am only half joking.““Content Curation: Contributing to ImprovedFindability” by Seth Earley. Information Outlook,December 2011, p. 14. 2
    3. 3. Two Case Studies  Exploratorium  Pacific Energy CenterSoap Film PaintingImage by S. Schwartzenberg 3
    4. 4. Exploratorium  Science, Art and Human Perception  Hands-on science in over 500 interactive exhibits  Museum as an educational center  14,000 indexed assets  Images, PDFs, Word files, audio and video filesPinscreen Faces Image by A. Snyder 4
    5. 5. EDAMExploratorium Digital Asset Management  IMLS funded  2001-2003  2.75 FTE staff Recollections Image by N. Rodger 5
    6. 6. Audiences  Educators  Museum Partners  Commercial Media  Journalists  Historical Researchers Salt PieceImage by A.Snyder  Staff 6
    7. 7. Departments  Media Production and Marketing  Learning Tools  Photography  Public Information  Teacher Professional Development  Exhibit ServicesRotunda at NightImage by S. Schwartzenberg 7
    8. 8. Central vs. Departmental Catalogs  Central: best quality, both high and med resolution; full indexing; available to all staff and partly to external audiences  Departmental Catalogs: range of quality and resolution; partial indexing; limited availability. Designed to help departments control access to their material. Fracture in Granite Image by P. Doherty 8
    9. 9. Conceptual Framework Categories / Keywords  By Audience  By Conceptual Area  By Exhibit Name  By Phenomena  By Date  By Place Light Walk  By EventImage by S. Schwartzenberg 9
    10. 10. Field Structure  Asset Creator  Other Contributor  Caption  Exhibit Builder  Person Portrayed  Master Format  Master Location BubblesImage by S. Schwartzenberg  Asset Quality  Copyright 10
    11. 11. Dissemination  Internal Network  External WebBrine Shrimp Ballet 11
    12. 12. CopyrightSolar Eclipse Sun’s Corona Image by A. Snyder 12
    13. 13. Challenges  Took a long time to get started  Processing/Indexing time  We spent much more time on infrastructure than we intended; time well spentAnti-Gravity Mirror 13
    14. 14. More Challenges  Physical organization of assets  Territoriality  Setting priorities  Lack of intellectual property policiesBubble Demonstrates Osmosis Image by S. Schwartzenberg 14
    15. 15. Solutions  Have patience with territorial feelings -new system will assert itself  Train and retrain  Document processes and policies through an internal website  Museum slowly changing processesArgon CandleImage by N. Roger 15
    16. 16. Pleasant Surprises  Popularity of the digital assets with staff and external users  Some of our best assets were created by non-media department staffCracks in a DoorImage by S. Schwartzenberg 16
    17. 17. More Surprises  New resources to come out of project include exhibit cross-reference database, event/exhibition databaseColored Shadows Image by A. Snyder 17
    18. 18. Hidden Treasures  Paul Doherty Collection  Staff scientist’s personal images  Demanded by teachers  Filled collection gaps: geology and astronomy  Agreement with him isCircumzenithal Arc model for future Image by P.Doherty agreements with other staff 18
    19. 19. Letting Go  What’s lost is lost  Prevent future loss Air RingsImage by S. Lani 19
    20. 20. Looking Forward  More customization to external audience needs  More evaluation  Concentration on audio and video assetsTorn Edge of Typing Paper  New audiences such as scientific researchers 20
    21. 21. Exploratorium Digital Libraryhttp://www.exploratorium.edu/digital_library/  Asset Archive  Explo.tv  Polar Media Collection  Math Explorer Activity Database  SMILE Pathway 21
    22. 22. Pacific Energy Center  Seeking DAM solution  Many formats  Internal use only  Ability for staff to add simple metadataPEC Heliodon 22
    23. 23. Those DAM Librarians! Know audiences – who they are, what they look for and how Expertise in building metadata schema and taxonomies Recognize the business value that finding information brings to an organization Create IP policies that address copyright issues Extensive experience and expertise organizing assets of all kinds and know that you get out of a record, what you put into it 23
    24. 24. Those DAM Librarians! Know how to organize information and assets for findability Generally they are viewed as neutral working for the good of the entire organization Have big picture view  Contribute to workflow strategies  Able to prioritize what needs to be indexed first and why Know to start small and let the success of a DAM project speak for itself 24
    25. 25. Thank you and be in touch! dhunt@information-edge.com http://www.information-edge.com http://www.information-edge.com/ieblog http://www.linkedin.com/in/informationedge http://twitter.com/debhunt6 Contact me and I’ll add you to my enewsletter mailing list. 25

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