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First English-Chinese Bilingual Haiku and Tanka Blog
NeverEnding Story
Tuesday, March 18, 2014
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 ...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:38 PM 1 comment:
Labels: Chen-ou Liu, death, Politics/Poetics of Re-Homing, sociopolitics,...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:01 AM 3 comments:
Labels: butterfly dream, haiku, Neal Whitman, winter
Butterfly Dream: Wi...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:10 AM 1 comment:
Labels: CT, George Swede, one man's maple moon, tanka, writing
早晨的太陽浮現在
陰...
(p. 7), the most disappointing thing about Cobb’s so-called “critical study” is his
complete misrepresentations of two key...
Whichever translation we may prefer, we are able to see that Basho did not write
consistently in a single style, but selec...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:45 AM No comments:
Labels: Basho, haibun, haibun poetics, The Narrow Road to the Interior,...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:17 AM 4 comments:
Labels: aging, CT, loss, one man's maple moon, Susan Constable, tanka
sh...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:40 AM No comments:
Labels: a room of my own, Chen-ou Liu, disaster, haibun, haiku, sociopo...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:50 AM 3 comments:
Labels: butterfly dream, haiku, relationship, Simon Hanson
Butterfly Dre...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:03 AM 3 comments:
Labels: Carol Purington, CT, one man's maple moon, relationship, star, t...
Saturday, March 8, 2014
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 3:24 PM 2 comments:
Labels: Alegria Imperial, CT, love, moon, one ma...
Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:46 PM 1 comment:
Labels: a room of my own, Chen-ou Liu, death, disaster, haibun, haiku, ra...
Angelo B. Ancheta
where soldiers
once slept and died --
a spider's home
Ambrosia, 3, 2009
Dick Whyte
blogging…
my random t...
Spring evening --
the wheel of a troop carrier
crushes a lizard
Konts: The Anthology of Southeastern European Haiku Poetry...
eyes of the ancestors
the twinkle
in winter stars
NeverEnding Story, February 21, 2013
Rebecca Drouilhet
first sunrise ......
train tunnel --
the sudden intimacy
of mirrored faces
Best of Issue Haiku, Presence, #22, 2004
Beverley George
the snow me...
moving into the sun
the pony takes with him
some mountain shadow
American Haiku in Four Seasons
Jane Reichhold
holding the...
Sylvia Forges-Ryan
scattering his ashes
the moon
in bits and pieces
First Prize, 1993 Harold G. Henderson Award
Sylvia For...
George Swede
alone at twilight...
sound of a mosquito
and unfinished dream
NeverEnding Story, August 29, 2013
Asni Amin
au...
he remembers
Modern Haiku, 41.2, Summer 2010
Bob Lucky
on the porch
a chair rocking
the waning moon
A Hundred Gourds, 2:3,...
I compact confusing thoughts ...
New Year's morning dew
Simply Haiku, 10:3, Spring/Summer 2013
Damir Janjalija
hurricane n...
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Never ending story

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  1. 1. First English-Chinese Bilingual Haiku and Tanka Blog NeverEnding Story Tuesday, March 18, 2014 Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 3:34 PM 1 comment: Labels: butterfly dream, haiku, Tatjana Debeljacki, wedding Butterfly Dream: Wedding Haiku by Tatiana Debeljacki English Original the wedding in the Old Town murmur of the river Asahi Haikuist Network, January 6, 2012 Tatiana Debeljacki Chinese Translation (Traditional) 在舊城 舉行的婚禮 河流私語 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 在旧城 举行的婚礼 河流私语 Bio Sketch Tatjana Debeljacki writes poetry, short stories, and haiku. She is a member of the Association of Writers of Serbia -UKS (since 2004) and the Haiku Society of Serbia. She is the deputy editor of Diogen and the editor of Poeta. She has four books of poetry published by Hammer & Anvil Books. Monday, March 17, 2014 Politics/Poetics of Re-Homing, XXIII not so-called news another Chinese jumps off the roof... on the nightstand, his dog-eared Lament for a Nation Total Pageviews 8 3 6 8 4 About NeverEnding Story 2013 Butterfly Dream Anthology 2014 Anthology Submissions Butterfly Dream (Haiku) One Man's Maple Moon (Tanka) A Room of My Own (Chen-ou Liu's Poems) Poetic Musings (Poetry Analysis) To the Lighthouse (Poetics) A Poet's Roving Thoughts (Reviews) Dark Wings of Night (Precursor Poets) Hot News & Cool Announcements NeverEnding Story... Chen-ou Liu's Blog, Poetry in the Moment Chen-ou Liu's Award-Winning Poems Politics/Poetics of Re-Homing (Tanka) 唱不完的詩歌 Links of Interest Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 Born in Taipei,Taiwan, Chen- ou Liu was a college teacher,essayist,editor,and two-time winner of the national Best Book Review Radio Program Award.In 2002,he emigrated to Canada and settled in Ajax,a suburb of Toronto. There, he continues to struggle with a life in transition and translation.Featured in New Resonance 7: Emerging Voices in English-Language Haiku, and listed as one of the top ten haiku poets for 2011(Simply Haiku, 9:3,4, Autumn/Winter 2011),Chen-ou Liu is the author of Ripples from a Splash:A Collection of Haiku Essays with Award-Winning Haiku, Following the Moon to the Maple Land(First Prize Winner of the 2001 Haiku Pix Chapbook Contest),Broken/Breaking English: Selected Short Poems and Politics/Poetics of Re- Homing. His tanka and haiku have been honored with 63 awards,including Certificate of Merit by the Tankagendai Corp,7th International Tanka Festival Competition, 2012,Tanka First and Third Places in the 2011 About the Editor/Translator
  2. 2. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:38 PM 1 comment: Labels: Chen-ou Liu, death, Politics/Poetics of Re-Homing, sociopolitics, tanka, tanka sequence Atlas Poetica, 15, July 2013 Notes: 1 You can read its preceding tanka or the whole sequence here. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:49 AM 1 comment: Labels: CT, gender, one man's maple moon, Pravat Kumar Padhy, tanka One Man's Maple Moon: Black and White Paintings Tanka by Pravat Kumar Padhy English Original black and white paintings on the pot the transgender searches the streak of colors to fill the gap of the emptiness Special Features:Chiaroscuro LGBT Tanka, Atlas Poetica, August 2012 Pravat Kumar Padhy Chinese Translation (Traditional) 有關鍋子 的黑白畫 一個變性人 搜索色彩的條紋 來填補空白的間隙 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 有关锅子 的黑白画 一个变性人 搜索色彩的条纹 来填补空白的间隙 Bio Sketch Born in India, poems widely published and anthologized. Works referred in Spectrum History of Indian Literature in English, Alienation in Contemporary Indian English Poetry etc. Poems awarded high acclamations by Writer’s Guild of India and Editors’ Choice awards. Pravat Kumar Padhy's Japanese short form of poetry appeared in many international journals and anthologies. Songs of Love: A celebration is his third collection of verse by Writers Workshop, Calcutta. Featured in The Dance of the Peacock: An Anthology of English Poetry from India, to be published by Hidden Brook Press, Canada, 2014 Sunday, March 16, 2014 San Francisco International Competition, Grand Prix in the 2010 Klostar Ivanic Haiku Contest,and 特選 (Prize Winner) in the 2010 Haiku International Association Haiku Contest. View my complete profile Follow by Email Email address... Submit Search ▼ 2014 (102) ▼ March (23) Butterfly Dream: Wedding Haiku by Tatiana Debeljac... Politics/Poetics of Re-Homing, XXIII One Man's Maple Moon: Black and White Paintings Ta... Butterfly Dream: Winter Solitude Haiku by Neal Whi... One Man's Maple Moon: A Tanka about Writing by Geo... To the Lighthouse: Orthodox Style of Haibun Based ... One Man's Maple Moon: Bone-Thin Hands Tanka by Sus... A Room of My Own: Ilha Formosa? One Man's Maple Moon: Earthquake Tanka by Aya Yuhk... Butterfly Dream: Holding Hands Haiku by Simon Hans... One Man's Maple Moon: Fireworks Tanka by Carol Pur... Butterfly Dream: Winter Raindrops Haiku by Tzod Ea... One Man's Maple Moon: Words of Love Tanka by Aleg... A Room of My Own: Brownie, you're doing a heck of ... Hot News: 66 Haiku Selected for 2013 Butterfly Dre... Butterfly Dream: Destroyed Tank Haiku by Andrzej D... One Man's Maple Moon: Purple Flowers Tanka by Jenn... Butterfly Dream: Hospice Window Haiku by Djurdja V... One Man's Maple Moon: Wedding Tanka by Ramesh Anan... Politics/Poetics of Re-Homing, XXII Butterfly Dream: Rabbit Prints Haiku by Kay L. Tra... A Poet's Roving Thoughts: The Narrow Road to the I... Butterfly Dream: Pond Haiku by Alegria Imperial Blog Archive
  3. 3. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:01 AM 3 comments: Labels: butterfly dream, haiku, Neal Whitman, winter Butterfly Dream: Winter Solitude Haiku by Neal Whitman English Original talking to myself out loud ... winter solitude Neal Whitman Chinese Translation (Traditional) 大聲地 自言自語 ... 冬日孤寂 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 大声地 自言自语 ... 冬日孤寂 Bio Sketch Neal Whitman began to write general poetry in 2005, haiku in 2008, and tanka in 2011. He writes to be read and believes that the reader is never wrong. With his wife, Elaine, he combines his poetry with her Native American flute and photography in free public recitals with the aim of their hearts speaking to other hearts. Saturday, March 15, 2014 One Man's Maple Moon: A Tanka about Writing by George Swede English Original Yesterday, I thought my new poem was brilliant today, it seems confused -- the morning sun in a haze over the marsh reeds Modern English Tanka, 1:2, Winter 2006 George Swede Chinese Translation (Traditional) 昨天,我認為 我的新詩卓越非凡 今天,它似乎顛三倒四 -- ► February (37) ► January (42) ► 2013 (482) Join this site w ith Google Friend Connect Members (34) More » Already a member? Sign in Followers
  4. 4. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:10 AM 1 comment: Labels: CT, George Swede, one man's maple moon, tanka, writing 早晨的太陽浮現在 陰霾的蘆葦沼澤之中 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 昨天,我认为 我的新诗卓越非凡 今天,它似乎颠叁倒四 -- 早晨的太阳浮现在 阴霾的芦苇沼泽之中 Bio Sketch George Swede has published two collections of tanka: First Light, First Shadows (Liverpool: Snapshot Press, 2006) and White Thoughts, Blue Mind (Edmonton: Inkling Press, 2010). His tanka have also appeared in a number of anthologies, including The Tanka Anthology (Red Moon Press, 2003) and a number of journals, including Ribbons and Gusts. Friday, March 14, 2014 To the Lighthouse: Orthodox Style of Haibun Based on That of Basho? The critic is beneath the maker, but is his needed friend. What tongue could speak but to an intelligible ear, and every noble work demands its critic... Next to invention is the power of interpreting invention; next to beauty the power of appreciating beauty. --Margaret Fuller Below is excerpt from my review essay, What Happens in [David Cobb’s Conception of] Haibun: A Critical Study for Readers Who Want More, a 30-page thematic, textual, and perspectival analysis of David Cobb's What Happens in Haibun: A Critical Study of an Innovative Literary Form, which was first published in Haibun Today, 7:3, September 2013 ...... Renowned poet and a founding member of the British Haiku Society, David Cobb, has recently published two books, Marching with Tulips and What Happens in Haibun: A Critical Study of an Innovative Literary Form, simultaneously. The second one uses the subtitle “A Critical Study for Use in Tandem with the Haibun Collection, Marching with Tulips” on its front cover, different from the one on its inside cover, which I think is mainly for a practical as well as an advertising purpose. Thematically speaking, What Happens in Haibun is divided into two parts; the first one consists of Introduction (pp. 5-15) and Conclusions (pp. 75-83), which provide Cobb’s reflections on the literary genre, haibun, practiced in Japan and in the West and his thoughts on the craft of haibun writing, and the second one Commentaries on Marching with Tulips (pp. 16-74), which is made up of detailed comments made by the critic David Cobb on each and every haibun included in Marching with Tulips written by the poet David Cobb... ...... In addition to failing to correctly understand the “various roles haiku may perform in haibun” (as the prime focus of his study) (p. 6) and to offer well-defined and structured material to support his thesis (that “adventitious haiku may sometimes enliven a haibun”)
  5. 5. (p. 7), the most disappointing thing about Cobb’s so-called “critical study” is his complete misrepresentations of two key issues related to the stylistics of haibun: “haibun as a derivative of haiku” and the so-called “orthodox style of haibun prose based on that of Basho” (pp. 8-9). When Cobb discontinues the discussion of his thesis, he not only jumps to the irrelevant topic, “The Japanese experience of haibun as it has come down to us in the West,” the fourth section of Introduction, but also changes the point of view, from “I” (individual voice to make one’s own comments) to “we” (collective voice to convey communal opinions or concerns), starting from this section, through the fifth section, “Is haibun a derivative of haiku?,” and ending at the middle of the first fourth of the sixth section, “Is there an orthodox style of haibun prose, perhaps based on that of Basho?” (pp. 7-9). After pointing out that poets in the West had received a “very few, mainly ancient examples in translation” (p. 7), such as those of Basho’s work, as the main source for studying haibun, and that many of them “[started] by writing haiku and only later [graduated] to haibun” (p. 8), Cobb stresses that “it may be easy to fall into the way of thinking that haibun is a derivative of haiku” (p. 8). Suddenly, he shifts the focus from discussing the pitfall that many of the poets in the West might experience to expressing the communal concern that “we sense (emphasis mine) that Makoto Ueda (the scholar known for his study of Basho’s work and haiku-related literature) is thinking along these lines when he writes, ‘A haibun has the same sort of brevity and conciseness as haiku. There is a further hint when he continues, ‘Another characteristic of haibun is the extent of its dependence on imagery. Abstract, general, conceptual words are shunned in favor of concrete visual images” (p. 8). The two quotes, both of which are not given page numbers, come from the passages regarding the stylistics of haibun (pp. 121-124) in Chapter 4, titled “Prose,” of Makoto Ueda’s well-known book, Matsuo Basho. In these passages, Ueda gives an in-depth analysis of the stylistics of Basho’s haibun. He outlines the following four characteristics: the “same sort of brevity and conciseness as a haiku" (p. 121), a "deliberately ambiguous use of certain particles and verb forms in places where the conjunction ‘and’ would be used in English” (p. 122), the “extent of its dependence on imagery” (p. 122), and the “writer’s detachment” (p. 123), all of which are used to prove that “the haibun is a prose equivalent of haiku” (emphasis mine, p. 124). In terms of stylistics, what Ueda emphasizes here in Section 1, titled “The Haibun: Haiku in Prose” (pp. 113-24), is that in the context of literary Japanese prose (“to be sure, literary Japanese prose has always tended to be imagistic rather than logical in all genres”) (p. 122), a haibun is prose with a haiku spirit, the same conclusion reached by scholars such as Haruo Shirane (Traces of Dreams, p. 212) and Lawrence Rogers (p. 280). Furthermore, Ueda points out that Basho’s prose is known for “its poetic beauty” (p. 112) and “Basho’s haibun carry that [imagistic] tendency to an extreme” (p. 123), and most importantly that “for one thing, Basho apparently thought of prose and poetry as complementary, as two modes of writing serving a single aim” (p. 112). Ueda never says anything about “haibun is a derivative of haiku” (p. 8) as Cobb claims through a collective voice (“we sense that Makoto Ueda is thinking along these lines . . .”) (p. 8). What comes after the section “Is haibun a derivative of haiku?” is another surprise: “Is there an orthodox style of haibun prose, perhaps based on that of Basho?” Under this rhetorically problematic heading, Cobb begins with the following three passages replete with glaring instances of misunderstanding and misrepresentations of his references: Shirane 8 quotes Basho as saying that “haibun should have, in accordance with the Chinese model, an even and balanced rhythm, stressing paired words and parallel syntax.” He goes on to comment, “Basho’s new haikai prose (read for this haibun prose) was, at least in Kyorai’s opinion, graceful and gentle in expression.” Basho urged his disciples to write haibun, not only with Chinese prose as a model, but in the spirit or style of haikai (he did not himself use the term haiku, but may have intended his karumi style of haiku which he favoured in his mature style).
  6. 6. Whichever translation we may prefer, we are able to see that Basho did not write consistently in a single style, but selected as appropriate to the context from a variety of styles. 9 Once again, there is no page number given to any of the quotes or references above. Cobb’s so-called “critical study” is poorly cited. And the two parenthesized statements above reveal that he is not familiar with the terminologies used in Japanese haikai literature: haikai prose means haibun (see Shirane’s General Index: “Haikai prose, see Haibun,” p. 365; “Haibun (haibun prose),” p. 364). Throughout Traces of Dreams, Shirane clearly points out that “haikai [is] . . . . Broadly used to refer to genres deriving from haikai such as the hokku [later called haiku, p.2], haiku, renku, haibun, haikai-related travel accounts and narrowly used to refer to haikai linked verse” (p. 294). Cobb’s misunderstanding of haikai-related terms is also revealed in the 10th statement of his “few bald statements about [his] own practice (p. 9): “In the unlikely event of being asked for a maxim, I shall not say that haibun should be written in the spirit and style of haikai. I might say, in the spirit and style of English haiku and English senryu” (p. 10). Historically and aesthetically speaking, based on the broad definition of haikai Shirane describes above, which is also adopted by other scholars, such as Peipei Qiu, 3 Cobb’s statement doesn’t make any sense. In the beginning of Chapter 8, titled “Remapping the Past: Narrow Road to the Interior,” Shirane emphasizes that Basho wrote haikai prose throughout his life but “consciously strove to develop haibun or prose with a haikai spirit” only shortly after his journey to Oku (p. 212), and that he began to use the word haibun after the journey, which first appeared in his 1690 letter to his disciple Kyorai (p. 212). And there is no textual evidence or scholarly reference offered by Cobb to support his own claim that “[Basho] may have intended his karumi style of haiku which he favoured in his mature style” (p. 9); most importantly, according to his own description given in Glossary of Japanese Terms (p. 84), Cobb misunderstands what the karumi style really is, which will be fully explained below in the passages regarding misunderstood Japanese literary terms. The second quote (with no note given) in the opening paragraph comes first (p. 216), and its meaning should be understood in the context of the stylistic comparisons between Saikaku’s and Basho’s work: “In contrast to Saikaku’s haibun, which combined classical prose and vernacular Japanese but which Basho considered coarse or vulgar in both content and expression, Basho’s new haikai prose was, at least in Kyorai’s opinion, graceful and gentle in expression, it had the flow of classical prose even as it incorporated the words and rhythms of vernacular Japanese and Chinese” (p. 216). And the first quote should also be understood in the context of the stylistic comparisons between classical poetry or classical prose and Basho’s haibun: “In contrast to classical poetry or classical prose, which was based on an alternating 5/7 syllabic rhythm, haibun should have, in accordance with the Chinese model, an even or (not “and” in Cobb’s quote) balanced rhythm (such as 4/4, 6/6) (this part omitted by Cobb), stressing paired words and parallel syntax, as in the following passage on the Tsubo Stone Inscription (Tsubo no ishibumi) in Narrow Road to the Interior” (pp. 217-8). This Chinese-influenced style (Six Dynasties parallel prose, “p’ien-wen”) is just one of the Chinese models explored by Basho. Most importantly, the thesis statement of Shirane’s in-depth analysis of Basho’s Narrow Road to the Interior is clearly written at the beginning of Chapter 8: “Basho remapped the cultural landscape of the Interior, or the northern region of Japan, through haibun, or haikai prose, a new genre that combined, in unprecedented fashion, Chinese prose genres, Japanese classical prototypes, and vernacular language and subject matter, thereby bringing together at least three major cultural axes . . . Oku no hosomichi (Narrow Road to the Interior), which may best be understood as an attempt to reveal the different possibilities of haibun in the form of travel literature” (emphasis mine, p. 212). Shirane never says anything about or hints at the so-called “orthodox style of haibun prose based on that of Basho” (p. 9) as Cobb claims. Read in the context of Basho’s attempt to “reveal the different possibilities of haibun in the form of travel literature” (p. 212), the first quote above merely indicates the first stop of Basho’s journey into this literary territory: new haibun, not old haikai prose. As his journey
  7. 7. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:45 AM No comments: Labels: Basho, haibun, haibun poetics, The Narrow Road to the Interior, to the lighthouse continues, the Chinese model in the quote evolves into models: a variety of different Chinese expository genres, “among them, rhapsody (fu), preface (hsu, J. jo), eulogy (sung, J. sho), record (chi, J. ki), biography (chuan, J. den), essay (wen, J.bun), treatise (lun, J. ron), inscription (pei, J. ishibumi), encomium (tsan, J. san), admonitions (chen, J. shin), lamentation (tiao-wen, J. chobun)—which became models for many of Basho’s haibun, including travel diaries” (p. 219). And most importantly, Basho’s creatively interweaving Chinese poetic motifs and stylistic techniques with haikai humor, and vernacular or classical Japanese transformed old haikai prose into new haibun (pp. 213- 23). As Shirane emphasizes at the end of the first section, titled “Haikai Prose,” of Chapter 8, “the end result is that the reader journeys from one type of language and prose genre to another, exploring the diverse possibilities of haibun” (p. 223). Strategically speaking, Cobb first reverses the order, chronological and logical, of the two quotes from Shirane’s Chapter 8, then uses the second paragraph to enhance the reader’s impression of Basho’s “orthodox style of haibun prose” as perceived by Shirane, and finally in the third paragraph, he offers the scholarly support for the textual evidence from Donald Keene as indicated in his note 9, which is the same conclusion reached by Shirane. And at the beginning of the following paragraph, the fourth of the section, he cries out that “No! Don’t let’s go any further down that winding path. After some thirty drafts arguing this way and that what relevance Basho’s dicta might still have for us, 300 years and a totally different culture later, I give up” (p. 9). After this crying out, the first-person singular is resumed, and through a “rather symbolic act” (he “went out into the garden . . . clipped twenty yards of overgrown hedge . . . [he] came in again”) (p.9), he offers “a few bald statements about [his] own practices” (p. 9), the aim of which is “to make haibun prose and haiku companionable, responsive to each other like bedfellows, and not to reduce both to any kind of common denominator” (p. 11). Strategically speaking, Cobb first uses the first-person plural to misrepresent Ueda’s and Shirane’s studies of Basho’s haibun, especially of the stylistics of the prose of haibun, then he resumes his first-person singular to offer 10 statements about his own writing practice, which reveals his true agenda, one that is at least intended for one of his goals: offering “sufficient criteria for selecting haibun to publish” (p. 5). Most importantly, in his statements (pp. 9-11), he discusses only the stylistics of the prose of haibun, and shows no interest in exploring any structural aspect of a haibun, such as the different placements of haiku and prose paragraphs that can have influences on the quality of a haibun as discussed in Jeffrey Woodward’s thoughtful essay, titled “Form in Haibun: An Outline,” 4 and none of these statements mentions the possibilities of using different types of prose or any mixture of them in an innovative way as Basho did in Narrow Road to the Interior. As a critic, David Cobb fails to take readers beyond the text horizon inscribed by the poet David Cobb as clearly indicated not only by his own statement—a “few bald statements about my (the poet’s) own practices” (p. 9)—but also by my comments mentioned above..... Editor's Note: For an in-depth analysis (structural and stylistic) of Basho's travel journal, The Narrow Road to the Interior, see A Poet's Roving Thoughts: The Narrow Road to the Interior by Basho Thursday, March 13, 2014 One Man's Maple Moon: Bone-Thin Hands Tanka by Susan Constable English Original as a child
  8. 8. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:17 AM 4 comments: Labels: aging, CT, loss, one man's maple moon, Susan Constable, tanka she found it difficult to say goodbye now bone-thin hands clutch the blanket's edge Honorable Mention, TSA Contest, 2013 Susan Constable Chinese Translation (Traditional) 小時候 她覺得很難 說再見 現在瘦骨嶙嶙的手 緊抓毯子的邊緣 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 小时候 她觉得很难 说再见 现在瘦骨嶙嶙的手 紧抓毯子的边缘 Bio Sketch Susan Constable’s tanka appear in numerous journals and anthologies, including Take Five. She placed third in the 2010 Tanka Society of America Contest and her tanka collection, The Eternity of Waves, is one of the winning entries in the eChapbook Awards for 2012. She is currently the tanka editor for the international on-line journal, A Hundred Gourds. Susan lives with her husband on Canada’s beautiful west coast. Wednesday, March 12, 2014 A Room of My Own: Ilha Formosa? Sendai earthquake ... the darkness pierced only by flashlights At night, I toss and turn, worrying about the long-term health risks for Japan and its neighbors. My homeland, Taiwan, is one of the closest. Fukushima at dawn -- one vending machine still glowing I remember during the late 1990s at the height of the anti-nuclear movement in Taiwan, someone handed me a flyer on the street. It listed important instructions on how to survive a nuclear disaster. The last one on the list said: "When driving away in the rescue convoy, please remember to look back, because that will be your last sight of Taipei." radioactive scare this a world of dew
  9. 9. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:40 AM No comments: Labels: a room of my own, Chen-ou Liu, disaster, haibun, haiku, sociopolitics and yet ... Notes: 1 In 1544, a Portuguese ship sighted the main island of Taiwan and named it "Ilha Formosa," which means “Beautiful Island.” Taipei is its capital. 2 This poem is a revision of Ilha Formosa?, which was first published in Sketchbook, 6:3, May/June 2011 Tuesday, March 11, 2014 Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 3:41 PM 1 comment: Labels: AyaYuhki, CT, disaster, one man's maple moon, tanka One Man's Maple Moon: Earthquake Tanka by Aya Yuhki English Original after the earthquake -- the arch bridge drops its shadow onto the water more distinctly Eucalypt, 15, 2013 Aya Yuhki Chinese Translation (Traditional) 地震之後 -- 拱橋 投射它的影子 在水面上 更為明顯 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 地震之後 -- 拱桥 投射它的影子 在水面上 更为明显 Bio Sketch Aya Yuhki was born and now lives in Tokyo. She started writing tanka more than thirty years ago and has expanded her interest to include free verse poetry, essay writing, and literary criticism. Aya Yuhki is Editor-in-Chief of The Tanka Journal published by the Japan Poets’ Society. Her works are featured on the homepage of the Japan Pen Club’s Electronic Library.
  10. 10. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:50 AM 3 comments: Labels: butterfly dream, haiku, relationship, Simon Hanson Butterfly Dream: Holding Hands Haiku by Simon Hanson English Original hand in hand our shadows do the same A Hundred Gourds,2:3, June 2013 Simon Hanson Chinese Translation (Traditional) 手牽手 我們的影子也做 同樣的動作 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 手牵手 我们的影子也做 同样的动作 Bio Sketch Simon Hanson lives in country South Australia enjoying the open spaces and nearby coastal environments. He is excited by the natural world and relishes moments of the numinous in ordinary things. He is published in various journals and anthologies and never realised how much the moon meant to him until he started writing haiku. Monday, March 10, 2014 One Man's Maple Moon: Fireworks Tanka by Carol Purington English Original The staccato of fireworks from the neighbor's field we sit in coolness emerging stars punctuate the words we haven't said June 2003 Poem of the Month, Christian Science Monitor Online Carol Purington Chinese Translation (Traditional) 來自鄰居田地
  11. 11. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:03 AM 3 comments: Labels: Carol Purington, CT, one man's maple moon, relationship, star, tanka 的斷續煙花聲響 坐在陰涼中 逐漸浮現的星星標示 我們尚未說過的話 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 来自邻居田地 的断续烟花声响 坐在阴凉中 逐渐浮现的星星标示 我们尚未说过的话 Bio Sketch Carol Purington is at home in the hills of western Massachusetts. She writes about seasonal and emotional rhythms, exploring connections between the worlds inside us and the worlds our bodies interpret. Her works have appeared in English-language haiku/tanka publications, both print and online, and they have won recognition in international contests. She has published three books of tanka: sThe Trees Bleed Sweetnes, A Pattern for This Place, and Gathering Peace. Sunday, March 9, 2014 Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 7:58 AM 3 comments: Labels: butterfly dream, CH, haiku, rain, Tzod Earf, winter Butterfly Dream: Winter Raindrops Haiku by Tzod Earf English Original winter raindrops ... the voice in my mind Tzod Earf Chinese Translation (Traditional) 冬天雨滴 ... 在我腦海裡 的聲音 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 冬天雨滴 ... 在我脑海里 的声音 Bio Sketch Tzod Earf lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. He is a beginning haiku poet.
  12. 12. Saturday, March 8, 2014 Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 3:24 PM 2 comments: Labels: Alegria Imperial, CT, love, moon, one man's maple moon, tanka One Man's Maple Moon: Words of Love Tanka by Alegria Imperial English Original the way her hand rests on his palm like moon on water mirrors words of love never spoken Moonbathing, 8, June 2013 Alegria Imperial Chinese Translation (Traditional) 她的手 放在他手掌的樣子像是 月亮在水面上 反映從未說過 的情話 Chinese Translation (Simplified) 她的手 放在他手掌的样子像是 月亮在水面上 反映从未说过 的情话 Bio Sketch Alegria Imperial’s haiku for Haiku Foundation’s 2012 Haiku Competition was Commended in the traditional category. She has also won honorable mentions in the 2007 Vancouver Cherry Blossoms Festival Invitational Haiku and her tanka adjudged Excellent, 7th International Tanka Festival Competition 2012. Her poetry have been published in international journals among them A Hundred Gourds, The Heron’s Nest, LYNX, Notes from the Gean, eucalypt and GUSTS. Formerly of Manila Philippines, she now lives in Vancouver, BC, Canada. Friday, March 7, 2014 A Room of My Own: Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job debris scattered here and there an old man playing blues
  13. 13. Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:46 PM 1 comment: Labels: a room of my own, Chen-ou Liu, death, disaster, haibun, haiku, racism It is not just the levees that break... the smell breaks away... from the skin when a boy is pulled out of the waters. The waters that come and stand ... still with the bodies of black people, of my people... she says, her voice breaking. a green doghouse with FEMA on its roof lower ninth ward at dusk Note: The title comes from George W. Bush's comment on Katrina relief work done by Michael DeWayne Brown, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Director. My haibun is inspired by Spike Lee's 2006 award-winning documentary, titled When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts. Hot News: 66 Haiku Selected for 2013 Butterfly Dream Anthology Haiku is a new experience every time.... And that is poetry. -- paraphrasing Jorge Luis Borges My Dear Fellow Poets and Readers: I'm pleased to announce the following 66 haiku selected for Butterfly Dream, 2013: Selected English-Chinese Bilingual Haiku. The anthology is scheduled to be published in July. Each poet whose haiku is/are included in the anthology will receive a copy of its e- book edition. Please post to all appropriate venues. Your time and help would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks for your support of my project. And look forward to reading your new work (see 2014 anthology submission guidelines) Chen-ou Note: The 2013 Butterfly Dream Prize winner will be announced in April. Selected Haiku evening drizzle notes from his guitar perfume the air Haigaonline, 12:2, December 2011 Christine L. Villa morning mist texturing the canvas of a dream Haiku Reality, 9:16
  14. 14. Angelo B. Ancheta where soldiers once slept and died -- a spider's home Ambrosia, 3, 2009 Dick Whyte blogging… my random thoughts yellow as lemon Mainichi Daily News, Oct. 23, 2012 Ernesto P. Santiago reading obituaries the here and there of fireflies Frogpond, 35:3, Winter 2012 Ben Moeller-Gaa snow falling… a darker silence in my father’s room Simply Haiku, 3:4, Winter 2005 Irene Golas over my thoughts the hush of pines Tinywords, August 2010 Peter Newton crayon map my son shows me the way to Neverland The Heron's Nest, 16:1, March 2012 John McManus shooting stars… the fizz of champagne on my tongue 2nd place, Shiki Kukai February 2012 Stella Pierides
  15. 15. Spring evening -- the wheel of a troop carrier crushes a lizard Konts: The Anthology of Southeastern European Haiku Poetry Dimitar Anakiev first summer rose in each drop of dew a new thorn Honorable Mention, 2011 Mainichi Haiku Contest Sonam Chhoki low winter moon just beyond the reach of my chopsticks Beyond the Reach of My Chopsticks Fay Aoyagi a grass snake escaping into my thought of it Honorable Mention, 2010 Haiku Now! International Haiku Contest Anatoly Kudryavitsky my father's footsteps the size of every morning World Haiku Review, December 2012 S.M. Abeles November cherry blossom -- what was I thinking? Past All Traps Don Wentworth concert under the stars -- a drop of sweat lost in her décolletage Lishanu, 2, 2011 Djurdja Vukelić-Rožić
  16. 16. eyes of the ancestors the twinkle in winter stars NeverEnding Story, February 21, 2013 Rebecca Drouilhet first sunrise ... avoiding eye contact with his gay brother Haiku of Merit, World Haiku Review, August, 2010 Ignatius Fay the night he left ... many sounds of summer rain DailyHaiku, Cycle 12, November 02, 2011 Kirsten Cliff skinny dipping -- one small step to land on the moon Winner of the Every Day Poets Great Big Little Poems Competition 2012 Marion Clarke breezy morning the gliding yellow bird turns into a leaf Peeling an Orange Peggy Heinrich hazy moon all the shapes of a hangover Notes From the Gean, 2:4, March 2011 Polona Oblak lengthening shadow ... above her eggs the hen's heart beats against my arm First Place, British Haiku Society James W Hackett International Haiku Award 2003 Beverley George
  17. 17. train tunnel -- the sudden intimacy of mirrored faces Best of Issue Haiku, Presence, #22, 2004 Beverley George the snow melted -- fences reappear between neighbors Heron’s Nest, 13:2, June 2011 Adelaide B. Shaw bedroom mirror -- the coldness of that dangling single breast Third prize, Sharpening the Green Pencil Haiku Contest Rita Odeh white lie the mirror doubles the white chrysanthemum The Unworn Necklace Roberta Beary winter moonlight … full lips pout from a billboard bearcreekhaiku.blogspot.com, Feb 2013 Anne Curran Winter sunshine The smell of sprouted potatoes in the cellar Second Prize, Mainichi Haiku Contest 2005 Rajna Begović full moon returning to an empty house Full Moon Ed Baker
  18. 18. moving into the sun the pony takes with him some mountain shadow American Haiku in Four Seasons Jane Reichhold holding the day between my hands a clay pot Frogpond, 23:3, Autumn, 2000 Jane Reichhold a poppy . . . a field of poppies! the hills blowing with poppies! Haiku Magazine, V.5, N1, 1971 Michael McClintock to each other in the dark -- waving lanterns Second Prize, San Francisco International Haiku Competition 2009 Michael McClintock slipping through my fingers ... a school of fish and summer sunset NeverEnding Story, June 13, 2013 Anna Yin harvest moon ... a child wades in the pond full of it 2nd place , 2012 Maple Moon Haiku Contest Brian Robertson Rereading The Iliad another corpse dragged through Fallujah Grand Prix, 39th A-Bomb Contest
  19. 19. Sylvia Forges-Ryan scattering his ashes the moon in bits and pieces First Prize, 1993 Harold G. Henderson Award Sylvia Forges-Ryan june breeze a hole in the cloud mends itself Third Runner-Up, The Heron's Nest Readers' Choice Popular Poets Award (2001) an'ya when my gendai world was flat I kept falling off the text horizon Notes from the Gean, 19, May 2013 kjmunro a chrysalis waits for spring autistic son Windfall 1 2013 Marilyn Humbert after the divorce a tattered moon in every window Distinguished Work Prize, 5th Yamadera Basho Memorial Museum Haiku Contest Pamela A. Babusci winter stars… only the sound of the neighbor wheeling his trash Modern Haiku, 36.1, 2005 Barry George morning mist… disconnected thoughts search for conjunctions Modern Haiku, 2013, 44.2
  20. 20. George Swede alone at twilight... sound of a mosquito and unfinished dream NeverEnding Story, August 29, 2013 Asni Amin autumn nap -- sunlight combs my hair FreeXpression, August 2010 Keitha Keyes graveyard visit a spider's web glitters in a broken vase Sketchbook, 2012 Máire Morrissey-Cummins two light beams shining where there were once twin towers -- my son, my daughter Grand Prize, 15th International “Kusamakura” Haiku Competition Jack Galmitz in Bryant Park 2,753 empty chairs not a breath of air yards & lots Jack Galmitz night storm her waters break Commended, NZPS International Haiku Contest 2008 Nola Borrell fading light dad tells the only story
  21. 21. he remembers Modern Haiku, 41.2, Summer 2010 Bob Lucky on the porch a chair rocking the waning moon A Hundred Gourds, 2:3, June 2013 Diana Teneva autumn twilight my parents in silence on the swing The Mainichi Daily, 2012 Ramesh Anand harvest moon the horizon between here and hereafter First Prize, Katikati Haiku Competition 2012 Lorin Ford shades of winter -- my mother in the passage between dreams Frogpond, 35:3, Autumn 2012 Lorin Ford spring breeze -- the pull of her hand as we near the pet store Into the Open: Poems from Poets of the Sixth Skagit River Poetry Festival Michael Dylan Welch first rain the paper boat carries my childhood Asahi Haikuist Network, May 31 2013 Pravat Kumar Padhy in five-seven-five
  22. 22. I compact confusing thoughts ... New Year's morning dew Simply Haiku, 10:3, Spring/Summer 2013 Damir Janjalija hurricane near she gets her nails done the color of the sea South by Southeast, 12:2, 2005 LeRoy Gorman no way to see the mountain (((((((((((((((((sombrero))))))))))))))))) Modern Haiku, 38:3, Autumn 2007 LeRoy Gorman buds on the apple tree my daughter trying on her first bra NeverEnding Story, January 10, 2014 Hristina Pandjaridis worn-out stairs up to my old mother’s home - an owl hooting The Heron’s Nest, 2007 Saša Važić rest home garden tomatoes rotting on the vine Modern Haiku, 44:2, Summer 2013 Erik Linzbach somehow our shrinking shadows touch -- harvest moon Dottie Dot Awards, Haiku Bandit Society, September 2011
  23. 23. Older PostsHome Subscribe to: Posts (Atom) Posted by Chen-ou Liu, 劉鎮歐 at 8:19 AM 14 comments: Labels: anthology, haiku, HC, hot news Alegria Imperial golden hills turkey vultures circle the remains of summer First Place, UkiaHaiku Contest (2013) Annette Makino cold day at the beach a man casts his line only twice Simply Haiku, 7:2, Summer 2009 Neal Whitman Copyright © 2013 NeverEnding Story. All Rights Reserved.. Watermark template. Powered by Blogger.

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