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Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
Body paragraphs
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Body paragraphs

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a lesson on writing body paragraphs for a persuasive essay

a lesson on writing body paragraphs for a persuasive essay

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • 1. Writing the Body Paragraphs for our Persuasive Essay
  • 2.  
  • 3. Let’s focus on the body paragraph
  • 4.
    • This is the meat of the essay. This is where you will make and support/prove your points.
  • 5.
    • Just like the three parts of the introduction or conclusion, there are three parts to the body paragraph
  • 6. Topic Sentence Meat of the Paragraph Closing Sentence
  • 7. Topic Sentence
    • The Topic Sentence it the MAIN point of the paragraph.
    • This sentence tells me what the whole paragraph is going to be about. This is usually a sentence that hooks me and makes me want to read the paragraph.
    • It also relates back to the thesis.
    • The entire paragraph is about this thought.
  • 8. Meat of the Paragraph
    • The MEAT of the paragraph is going to be all the details, examples, and opinions that I can give about the topic sentence.
    • I should have several sentences.
    • I must really cover the topic.
    • And I should have a variety of sentence styles.
      • This sentences can be CDs or CMs.
  • 9.
    • CD stands for Concrete Detail
      • A concrete detail (CD) is something that I can prove.
        • I can prove something that I can see
          • The sky is blue. Shakespeare wrote Hamlet .
        • I can prove something that I can give a number for
          • Four out of five dentist like Crest better
        • I can prove a quote
          • “ Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” - John F. Kennedy
        • I can prove a fact
          • Raleigh is the capital of North Carolina
          • Many cities in NC have passed a law that requires people to recycle plastic, glass, and other materials.
        • I can prove common knowledge
          • Smoking is harmful to your health.
  • 10.
    • CM stands for CoMmentary
    • A commentary (CM) is something that describes or gives an opinion.
        • Describes
          • The lakes may be filled with empty bottles and trash. This washes up on
          • When the Wolfpack walks out on the field all the fans start to do the howl loudly.
          • The easy rhythm of the poem lulls the reader into felling a sense of well being.
        • Gives and opinion
          • If more people would recycle, we could save a lot of money and maybe even save the earth.
          • I think more people should volunteer. If everyone just gave an hour of time each week to pick up trash in the community we could make a big difference.
          • The Duke – UNC basketball rivalry is the most fierce in all college basketball.
  • 11. Every CD must have at least one CM! And… Every CM must have at least one CD! They go together like peanut butter and jelly! In other words… You can ’t have one without the other!
  • 12.
    • The closing sentence is the last sentence in a paragraph. It should restate the main idea of the paragraph. But remember – do not repeat the topic sentence; if the idea is the same, then rephrase it. Try and make your closing sentence a ‘clincher’, leaving your reader thinking about it.
  • 13.
    • While the argument rages over the effects of smoking on public health, the question that remains is this: “How much is society entitled to penalize smokers for their decisions because—in society’s view—those decisions are unhealthy?” (Samuelson). Smoking tobacco is not an illegal act, yet the 25 percent of Americans who do smoke are often treated as if they were criminals. They are incessantly nagged, blamed for numerous illnesses and unpleasantries, and made to feel guilty by self-righteous nonsmokers (Bork 28). The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that living with a smoker increases your chance of lung cancer by 19 percent. What they fail to tell you is that, in contrast, (firsthand) smoking increases your chance 1,000 percent (Buckley). Why is the act of smoking tobacco, which merely injures oneself, so scrutinized and shunned by society, while drinking alcohol, which is by far more deadly to innocent bystanders, is accepted by society and virtually unregulated? (Krauthammer). One may not wish to be seated near an extremely obese person in a restaurant, but it would certainly be unconstitutional to deny service to these patrons. In modern society, the government knows better than to discriminate against minorities, senior citizens, or the physically handicapped; it does not hesitate, however, to discriminate against smokers.
    Can you identify the CDs and CMs here? Closing Sentence Topic Sentence
  • 14.
    • Get writing!!!!!!

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