Guidelines For Writing A Critique
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Guidelines For Writing A Critique

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General guidelines for writing Critical or Rhetorical Analysis essay

General guidelines for writing Critical or Rhetorical Analysis essay

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Guidelines For Writing A Critique Guidelines For Writing A Critique Presentation Transcript

  • Guidelines for Writing a Critique
  • Step 1
    Read.
    Read.
    Read.
    Re-read.
    Read again.
  • Step 1 1/2
    While you read, take notes
    Underline things
    Circle words.
    Do you notice any patterns?
    Do you notice anything about the author’s tone?
    Is it funny? Angry? Serious?
  • Step 2
    Gather your ammunition
    Find out where the work was published – does that help you figure out the author’s purpose and audience?
    What are the author’s obvious strategies in making his or her point?
    Are they successful?
  • Step 3Go Deeper
    Look at underlying assumptions, both yours and the writer’s
    Look for places where the author has left gaps – are these deliberate? Do they need to be filled?
    Does the author play on your emotions? How? Is he or she using any images or ideas that play on some abstract, for example patriotism?
  • Step 4
    Organize
    Arrange paragraphs based on clusters you find in your reading
    AFTER organizing, you should see a clear thesis beginning to emerge
  • Your Essay should include
    A general introduction, in which you state your thesis
    A brief (BRIEF) (that means SHORT) (like ONE paragraph!) summary
    Something about the purpose and audience, as you see it
    Something about the author’s strategies, as you detect them
    Whether they are successful or not
    Analysis of critical elements, like underlying values, rhetorical appeals.
    Comments on what worked, what didn’t
    Your personal response to the issue (also pretty short)
    Overall conclusion
  • How many paragraphs was that?
    More than five, you betcha.
    And forget the 3-part thesis. It won’t work.
  • Step 5
    Write
    Write
    Revise.
  • General Guidelines
  • Organize by rhetorical point, not by summary
    Allow your organization to develop naturally out of what you have found in your reading and note-taking.
  • Use the Present Tense
  • Refer to the author by his or her last name
    Lewis argues, Atwood writes, James demonstrates…
  • Common Errors of Expression
    The essay states
    The essay argues
    This essay will show…
    In this essay he writes…
    or In Margaret Atwood’s essay, she writes…
  • Oh, and it’s an ESSAY
    Not a story.