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A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
A  Lightning  Tour Of  M L A
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A Lightning Tour Of M L A

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Brief highlights of MLA style for use in literature class

Brief highlights of MLA style for use in literature class

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  • 1. A Lightning Tour of MLA For the Confused and Distressed Literature Student
  • 2. Titles
    • Books (Frankenstein, Gulliver’s Travels) and sometimes plays are underlined or in italics. Not both.
    • Poems, essays (“A Modest Proposal”) and other works within works (sometimes plays) are in quotation marks.
  • 3. Formatting Quotes
    • Integrate grammatically whenever possible into your own sentence.
    • Lines of poetry should be indicated as follows: “The sedge is withered from the lake / And no birds sing.” Note: Space Slash Space
    • More than two lines of anything should be indented five spaces on both sides and set off from the text. No quotation marks.
  • 4. Parenthetical Citations 1: What
    • For poems, line numbers only.
    • If discussing more than one work by one author, distinguish with abbreviated title (“Flea” 15) (“Autumn” 12)
    • For prose, use page of text you are using – no need to cite Norton, you should include edition of Frankenstein in wks cited list if different from class text. No particular need to cite author’s name unless it’s not obvious whom you are discussing.
    • Cite critical work as usual (author’sname 9)
  • 5. Parenthetical Citations 2: Where
    • The parentheses go after the quote but before the period except in the case of indented quotes when it goes at the end.
    • Milton echoes Marlowe when he writes that a mind “in itself / Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heav’n” (234-5).
    • Elizabeth Barrett Browning suggests that women “are paid / The worth of our work, perhaps” (464).
  • 6. Punctuation
    • Integrate quotes grammatically
    • Shelley held a bold view: “Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the World” (794).
    • Shelley thought poets “the unacknowledged legislators of the World” (794).
    • “ Poets,” according to Shelley, “are the unacknowledged legislators of the World” (794).
  • 7. More Punctuation
    • Reproduce internal punctuation (and capitalization) exactly as written except for a closing period (which goes after the parentheses). Retain closing exclamation and question marks.
    • Dorothea Brook responds: “What a wonderful little almanac you are, Celia!” (7).
  • 8. Sample Works Cited Entry 1
    • Simple Journal Entry
    Koepke Brown, Carole. “Episodic Patterns and The Perpetrator: The Structure and Meaning of Chaucer’s Wife of Bath’s Tale.” The Chaucer Review 31:01 (1996) : 19-34.
  • 9. Sample Works Cited Entry 2
    • Journal Entry from EBSCO
    Neman, Beth S. &quot;A Modest Proposal for Testing 'A Voyage to the Country of the Houynhnm's' For Dramatic Irony.&quot; English Language Notes. 24:2 (Dec 86). p37. 7p. Academic Search Premier . EBSCO. Camosun College Lib. Victoria, B.C. 20 Nov 2006. <http://search.epnet.com>.
  • 10. Sample Works Cited Entry 3
    • Online Article
    Vaught, Jennifer C. “Spenser’s Dialogic Voice in Book I of The Faerie Queene.” 2001. 23 Nov 2006. < http://www.geocities.com/yskretz/spenservaught.html>

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