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Spanish speaking artists in primary mfl

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  • 1. Spanish-Speaking Artists in Primary MFLThese slides are used by teachers atSt Luke’s CE Primary School during the school’sannual Spanish Week. The activities here are onlysuggestions and teachers are free to adapt to theirclasses skills and needs. Feel free to use and shareit. I hope you find it useful.Deivis PothinMFL Subject Leaderwww.deivispothin.com @dpothin
  • 2. Miró
  • 3. Information for Teachers• Background info - Miro was a Spanish painter who created colourful and abstract paintings with shapes of colours and lines. His works are often referred to as surreal. But to young eyes, Miro knew about colours and shapes!• Questioning – What colours / shapes can you see? How do these paintings make you feel? What do you think these drawings might mean?• Task – children to cut out simple regular and irregular shapes e.g. circle, squares, etc using bright coloured- paper, e.g. red, blue, green, yellow, etc and make a collage.
  • 4. Diego Rivera
  • 5. The Flower Carrier What is happening in this painting? What is the man carrying? Who is helping him? How are they related? Where is he taking the flowers to?
  • 6. Information for Teachers• Background info – Diego was born in Mexico in 1986. Rivera believed that art should be enjoyed by everyone, especially the poor, working class people. Diego Riveras murals and canvas paintings recaptured Mexican history. He chose as his subjects not only social commentary, but the earth, the farmer, the labourer, the costumes and popular characters of Mexico. His style was simplified and colourful, precise, direct and realistic.• Questioning – What can you see in these paintings? What are the objects /people like? What same object can you see in all the paintings? How do these paintings make you feel?• Task – Children to colour in a copy of The Flower Carrier. Brainstorm different kinds of flowers that can be drawn in the man’s basket. Choose some examples to go on display.
  • 7. Rufino Tamayo
  • 8. What canyou see inthis picture?Why is hesmiling?Whatcolours canyou see?
  • 9. Information for Teachers• Background info – Rufino Tamayo was born in Mexico in 1899. Most of his painting used simple opaque colours, simplistic outline of people, focusing on the significance of icons to express meaning.• Questioning – What colours and shapes can you see in these paintings? What are these people like? How do these paintings make you feel? Which one is your favourite painting? Why?• Task – Children reproduce the painting of the smiling figure. Firstly, colour in the background using chalk. On a separate piece of paper, children cut out the shape of the smiling figure (provided template if necessary), colour it in with chalk and stick it on top of the background previously coloured in. Choose some examples to go on display.
  • 10. Frida Kahlo
  • 11. What objectscan you see inthis picture?Why do youthink theymight mean?Why do youthink she isso serious?
  • 12. Information for Teachers• Background info – Frida Kahlo was a Mexican artist who was widely known for her self-portraits. Of her 143 paintings, fifty-five are self-portraits, which frequently incorporate symbolic portrayals of her physical and psychological wounds. Kahlo was deeply influenced by indigenous Mexican culture, which is apparent in her paintings bright colours and dramatic symbolism.• Questioning – What do all these painting have in common? What can you see in the background? What do you think the objects / animals might mean? How do these paintings make you feel? Which one is your favourite painting? Why?• Task – Children draw a self-portrait of themselves, drawing objects in the background that give some information about themselves. Choose some examples to go on display.
  • 13. Fernando Botero
  • 14. What can younotice aboutthis family ?Why do youthink they areall overweight?Where arethey? What arethey doing?
  • 15. Information for Teachers• Background info – Fernando Botero was born in Colombia in 1932. His paintings and sculptures are united by their proportionally exaggerated, or "fat" figures.• Questioning – What do all these painting have in common? What can you see in the background? Why do you think all these people are overweight? How do these paintings make you feel? Which one is your favourite painting? Why?• Task – Children draw one or more characters with exaggerated proportions. Choose some examples to go on display.
  • 16. Pablo Picasso
  • 17. Information for Teachers• Background info – Pablo Picasso was born in Spain. He was an extremely creative and inventive modern artist. He started drawing and painting at a young age, and continued to experiment with different styles throughout his long career. He was well-trained, and knew the "rules" of painting very well, and then decided to "break the rules”, hence the strange faces.• Questioning – What do all these painting have in common? What colours and shapes can you see? How do these paintings make you feel? Which one is your favourite painting? Why?• Task – Show children the first two minutes (only!) of Picasso’s documentary on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JUnPJHif8U. Children create a head in the style of Picasso using the website http://www.picassohead.com/. Firstly, look at the gallery for ideas. Then click on create to draw their own version. Finally, show children how to Printscreen, save on to Word (as it is not possible to print it directly from the website) and crop. Choose some examples to go on display.
  • 18. Salvador Dalí
  • 19. Information for Teachers• Background info – Born in Catalonia, Spain in 1904, Salvador Dali showed artistic talent early. His father was very strict but his mother was much gentler and encouraged him to explore his interest in art. In 1916 he began drawing classes. Then, in 1922, Dali went to Madrid to study at the Academia de San Fernando. Salvador Dali strove to shock people, not only through his art, but with his actions and his words as well.• Questioning – What do all these painting have in common? What colours and shapes can you see? How do these paintings make you feel? Which one is your favourite painting? Why?• Task – Watch the first 5 minutes of Dali’s documentary on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtEdmPGLZnM. Look at some of the pictures and discuss them. Give children 5 minutes to discuss and draft on a piece of scrap paper a drawing representing a dream. Using acrylic paint, children draw their dream representations. Encourage them to explain the symbolism of their paintings. Choose some examples for display.