Helping Your CEO Understand Talent Management

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Your CEO and senior stakeholders are stretched, and they probably underestimate the time, commitment, and personal involvement required for talent initiatives. But their buy-in is critical—especially paired with your expertise.

Discover the 5 points you can share with your CEO about Talent Management—from the connecting talent strategy to business, to using more objective data and less gut instinct. Plus, you’ll find key questions to shift your CEO’s thinking about how and where you need to focus your talent initiatives.

Published in: Business, Technology

Helping Your CEO Understand Talent Management

  1. 1. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Helping Your CEO Understand Talent Management 1
  2. 2. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved.2 No one better understands the importance of talent to an organization than the CEO.
  3. 3. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved.3 But CEOs are stretched—they can underestimate the time, commitment, and personal involvement required for talent initiatives.
  4. 4. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved.4 CEOs can benefit from the expertise that HR can bring to the table.
  5. 5. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. What guidance do CEOs need most? Here are things you can share with your CEO. 5
  6. 6. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Talent Strategy Doesn’t Automatically Support Business Goals #1 6
  7. 7. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Talent Strategy Doesn’t Automatically Support Business Goals #1 You may have the positioning, the capital, and the processes to accomplish business outcomes, but without the needed quantity and quality of talent, execution simply won’t happen. 7
  8. 8. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #1 Start by answering some critical questions: • What future challenges will leaders need to address? • What kind of leaders do you need and how many? • What knowledge, skills, experience, and personal attributes will be critical to their success? Talent Strategy Doesn’t Automatically Support Business Goals 8
  9. 9. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Talent Management Isn’t (Just) Succession Planning #2 9
  10. 10. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Here is how to make the jump with your CEO to a broader talent management strategy. #2 Talent Management Isn’t (Just) Succession Planning 10
  11. 11. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Focus on the critical positions and key players to support leadership transitions at every level. #2 Talent Management Isn’t (Just) Succession Planning 11
  12. 12. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Direct your energy at building a pipeline of ready leaders, not just matching individuals to specific roles. #2 Talent Management Isn’t (Just) Succession Planning 12
  13. 13. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Don’t treat all roles alike—there are business-critical roles that are harder to fill and where lower performance will have the largest consequence. #2 Talent Management Isn’t (Just) Succession Planning 13
  14. 14. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Potential Isn’t Everything #3 14
  15. 15. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything It’s easy to confuse performance, potential, and readiness, so it’s important to note the distinction between them. 15
  16. 16. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything Performance is how someone is performing in their current role. 16
  17. 17. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything Potential is someone’s likelihood for leadership growth. 17
  18. 18. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything Readiness is someone’s fit with a specific role or job. 18
  19. 19. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything Confusing these will lead to bad decisions about talent. 19
  20. 20. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything For example, someone performing successfully in their current job, may not be ready for a role at the next level. 20
  21. 21. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #3 Potential Isn’t Everything Identifying someone with potential is only part of the equation—they may still not be ready for the role and will benefit from development to fill those readiness gaps. 21
  22. 22. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Your Eye for Talent Isn’t That Good #4 22
  23. 23. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #4 Your Eye for Talent Isn’t That Good Your CEO may be very confident about spotting talent. But talent decisions have to be about more than judgment. 23
  24. 24. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #4 Your Eye for Talent Isn’t That Good Organizations are complex and CEOs don’t have as many opportunities to work with people as they may have in a prior role. So judgments are made on a few interactions. 24
  25. 25. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #4 Your Eye for Talent Isn’t That Good Look for more objective data to uncover talent capability and gaps when it comes to promotion decisions. 25
  26. 26. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. All Leaders Should Be Responsible for Developing Their People—and They Need The Skills To Do It #5 26
  27. 27. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #5 All Leaders Should Be Responsible for Developing Their People—and They Need the Skills To Do It Start by thinking of your leaders as talent advocates. 27
  28. 28. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #5 All Leaders Should Be Responsible for Developing Their People—and They Need the Skills To Do It They may have bypassed key career transitions, leaving them with leadership skill deficits—so don’t let them place this as a low priority. 28
  29. 29. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #5 All Leaders Should Be Responsible for Developing Their People—and They Need the Skills To Do It So what should you expect from senior leaders? 29
  30. 30. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. #5 All Leaders Should Be Responsible for Developing Their People—and They Need the Skills To Do It If every leader has the skills to: • Scout for potential • Have meaningful performance discussions • Coach for success • Build creative development plans • Make effective hiring and promotion decisions Then talent management processes will have momentum of their own. 30
  31. 31. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. LET’S RECAP! 31
  32. 32. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved.32 1. Talent strategy doesn’t automatically support business goals 2. Talent management isn’t (just) succession planning 3. Potential isn’t everything 4. Your eye for talent isn’t that good 5. All leaders should be responsible for developing their people—and they need the skills to do so points for your next conversation with the CEO
  33. 33. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Questions to about talent 33
  34. 34. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Can you articulate your talent strategy and how it supports your business strategy? Questions to shift your CEO’s thinking about talent 34
  35. 35. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Where will your senior leaders of tomorrow come from if you aren’t strong at the front line? Questions to shift your CEO’s thinking about talent 35
  36. 36. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Do you make talent decisions based on gut instinct? Questions to shift your CEO’s thinking about talent 36
  37. 37. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. How many of your recent promotions have been based on job performance—and how many of them have failed? Questions to shift your CEO’s thinking about talent 37
  38. 38. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved. Do you have leaders destined for great things who don’t develop as you need them to? Questions to shift your CEO’s thinking about talent 38
  39. 39. © Development Dimensions International, Inc., MMXIV. All rights reserved.39 As the chief talent champion, the CEO needs to be behind talent initiatives. Download the CEO’s Guide to Talent Management for more straight talk about Talent Management. Help them be that champion.

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