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His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii
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His 102 chapter 26 the second world war part ii

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WWII, strategic bombing, atomic bomb

WWII, strategic bombing, atomic bomb

Published in: Education, News & Politics
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  • 1. Chapter 26 “It was a denial of God. It was a denial of man. It was the destruction of the world in miniature form.” -Auschwitz Survivor Hugo Gryn
  • 2. War demanded massive resources and a national commitment  Rationing  Production  Propaganda campaigns encouraged the production of war equipment  Patriotism, communal interests, and a common stake in winning the war
  • 3. War demanded massive resources and a national commitment  Production  Allies built tanks, ships, and airplanes by the tens of thousands  U.S. Britain and Soviets had more resources and people available for wartime production  Mobilization of women  Long work shifts  Germany was less efficient in the use of workers and resources  Germany and Japan robbed occupied territories of resources
  • 4. New targets  Centers of industry as military targets  American and British strategic bombing  For the British, a war of retribution  For the Americans, grinding down Germany without sacrificing too many Allied lives  The Dresden firebombing
  • 5. Dresden, Germany C. 1910
  • 6. Dresden, March, 1945
  • 7. Dresden
  • 8. Dresden
  • 9. The Nazi penetration of the Soviet Union The siege of Leningrad The Eastern Front  Changes in the character of war  War to save the Russian motherland (rodina)—the Russian will to survive  Victory during the “General Winter”—took its toll on Nazi supplies
  • 10. The Eastern Front  Changes in the character of war  Astonishing recovery of Soviet army  Whole industries were rebuilt  Soviets found the Blitzkrieg predictable
  • 11. The Eastern Front  The turning point—1943  Germans aimed an all-out assault on Stalingrad  Drawn into bitter house-to-house fighting with Soviet snipers  Stalingrad destroyed  With supplies low, the Russian armies surrounded the Germans in the city  January 1943: German surrender of Stalingrad
  • 12. 23 August 1942 – 2 February, 1943 Casualty estimates as high As 2,000,000.
  • 13. The Eastern Front  Soviet offensives  Kursk (1943)  Six thousand tanks and 2 million men in battle lasting six weeks  German army was crushed  Ukraine back in Soviet hands, Romania knocked out of the war  Soviet victories in Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia
  • 14. The Western Front  Stalin pressured the Allies to open a second front in the West  The Allied invasion of Sicily  Mussolini surrendered in summer 1943  The Normandy invasion (June 6, 1944)  The liberation of Paris (August 14, 1944)  The Battle of the Bulge (December 1944)
  • 15. Storming “Fortress Europe.”
  • 16. The Western Front  Allies crossed the Rhine in April 1945  Germans preferred to surrender to the Americans or British rather than face the Russians  Soviets entered Berlin on April 21, 1945  Hitler committed suicide in his bunker beneath the Chancellery on April 30, 1945  Germany surrendered unconditionally on May 7
  • 17. “Raising the Red Flag Over the Reichstag, ” Evgeny Khaldei, May 1, 1945
  • 18. The war in the Pacific  British, Indian, and Nepalese troops liberated Rangoon (Burma)  Australians recaptured Dutch East Indies  Okinawa fell to the Americans (June 1945)  Chinese communists and nationalists pushed the Japanese back on Hong Kong
  • 19. The war in the Pacific  Soviet forces marched through Manchuria to Korea  United States, Britain, and China called on Japan to surrender or be destroyed on July 26  B-29s began systematic bombing of Japanese cities  Japan refused to surrender
  • 20. The race to build the bomb  Nuclear fission and the chain reaction  British passed technical information on to American scientists  The Manhattan Project  Managing the effort to build an American atomic bomb
  • 21. The race to build the bomb  Los Alamos, New Mexico (1943)  Laboratory that brought together most capable nuclear physicists  J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904–1967) placed in charge of the project  First atomic test on July 16, 1945, near Los Alamos
  • 22. The war in the Pacific  The decision to drop the bomb  Was it necessary? Japan had already been beaten  Harry Truman  August 6, 1945: Hiroshima, August 9: Nagasaki  Japan surrendered unconditionally on August 14, 1945
  • 23. The Atom Bomb
  • 24. A new world ravaged by war Mass killing Technology, genocide, and global war
  • 25. Estimated 50-70 million total deaths  Military Casualties 22-25 million  Civilian casualties 38-55 million Deaths by Country  USSR: 22-26 million  Germany: 7-9 million  Japan: 2-3 million  Poland: 5.6- 5.8 million  China: 10-20 million  France: 567,600  Britain: 450,900  United States: 418,500 (
  • 26. Nazi Manifesto, Documents of the International Military Tribunal for Germany, Nazi Conspiracy and Aggression Vol. 4, Avalon Project at Yale Law School, http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/nca_v4men u.asp German Soldiers leading Jews from the Warsaw Ghetto during the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleI d=10005188&MediaId=734 WWII War Deaths by Alliance. Wikimedia Commons,  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WorldWarII-DeathsByAlliance- Piechart.png

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