Citizenship

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Citizenship

  1. 1. U.S. Citizenship<br />
  2. 2. Immigration Policy<br />Since 1776, 70 million immigrants have come to the US<br />Before 1882, no limits on immigration<br />1882: Chinese Exclusion Act<br />Immigration Acts (1921 & 1924)<br />National Origins Act 1929 (quotas)<br />Quotas end in 1965<br />Immigration Reform Act of 1965 (Preference System)<br />Undocumented Aliens<br />Papers (Passport, Visa, Entry Permit)<br />Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (Amnesty & Criminalized Employment)<br />Since 9/11, immigration more strongly enforced<br />
  3. 3. Immigration Reform and Control Act (1986)<br />Immigration Reform Act (1965)<br />Immigration Acts (1921 & 1924)<br />Chinese Exclusion Acts (1882)<br />National Origins Act (1929)<br />
  4. 4.
  5. 5. Immigration in 2000<br />Source: NY Times Immigration Explorer<br />
  6. 6. Rights of Noncitizens<br />Status:<br />Undocumented Aliens<br />Resident Alien (Lawful Permanent Resident)<br />Nonresident Alien<br />Refugee<br />Rights:<br />May not vote<br />May not serve on jury<br />Freedom of movement limited<br />No obligation to join military<br />Must pay taxes and obey laws<br />Deportation for serious crimes<br />
  7. 7. Citizenship<br />Born in the United States or US territories <br />(Guam, Puerto Rico, Virgin Island, etc.)<br />Naturalization=process of becoming a citizen<br />Before 1868 only whites were considered citizens (14th Amendment)<br />Duties of Citizens:<br />Know their rights<br />Respect the Law<br />Pay Taxes<br />Become informed voters<br />Serve on Juries<br />Work at Polls on Election Day<br />Join groups for causes they are interested in<br />Write to elected officials about their views<br />Take part in political life of the nation<br />
  8. 8. Naturalization<br />Basic Requirements:<br />18 years of age<br />Entered the national legally<br />Have lived in the US for at least 5 years<br />Additional Requirements:<br />Be able to read, write, and speak English (over age 50 or lived in US for 20 years not required)<br />Be of good “moral character”<br />Support the Constitution and the United States<br />Know basic information about the history and government of the United States<br />Process:<br />File petition for naturalization<br />Pay an application fee<br />Be interviewed by an immigration official<br />Have 2 witnesses testify to the person’s character<br />Pass the Citizenship test<br />Take the oath of affirmation<br />
  9. 9. Oath of Affirmation<br />“I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces when required by law; or that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by law; and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion: So help me God.”<br />

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