HIV in Black Women
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HIV in Black Women

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Presented to the Nazarene Baptist Church Women's Ministry

Presented to the Nazarene Baptist Church Women's Ministry

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  • HIV infection rates are higher among black MSM compared to other MSM. More new HIV infections occurred among young black MSM (aged 13–29) than among any other age and racial group of MSM.
  • During 2006 through 2009, more than half of the diagnoses of HIV infection in the United States and dependent areas were in persons of minority races/ethnicities. Blacks/African Americans account for a disproportionate share of diagnoses of HIV infection in comparison to persons of other races/ethnicities. From 2006 through 2009, there were an estimated 171,840 diagnoses of HIV infection in the 40 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. During this time period, blacks/African Americans accounted for 50% of the total number diagnosed with HIV infection; black/African American women accounted for 64% of total women diagnosed with HIV infection; and 66% of all diagnosed HIV infections attributed to heterosexual contact were among blacks/African Americans. Additionally, 68% of children diagnosed with HIV infection from 2006-2009 were black/African American.  In 2009 alone, 50% of the total estimated number of diagnoses of HIV infection among adults and adolescents were among blacks/African Americans. The following 40 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been estimated. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.  Heterosexual contact is with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.
  • So how can we say that in this epidemic we are all equal?
  • The pie chart on the left illustrates the distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection in 2009 by race/ethnicity in the 40 states with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. The pie chart on the right shows the population distribution by race/ethnicity in the 40 states in 2009. In 2009, blacks/African Americans made up approximately 13% of the population of the 40 states but accounted for 52% of diagnoses of HIV infection. Whites made up 68% of the population of the 40 states but accounted for 28% of diagnoses of HIV infection. Hispanics/Latinos made up 13% of the population of the 40 states but accounted for 18% of HIV/AIDS diagnoses of HIV infection. The following 40 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.  Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been estimated. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.  Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race. More information on the HIV epidemic and HIV prevention among blacks/African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos is available in CDC fact sheets at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/facts.htm.
  • The pie chart on the left illustrates the distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection among adult and adolescent females in 2009 by race/ethnicity in the 40 states with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. The pie chart on the right shows the distribution of the female population of the 40 states in 2009.  In 2009, adult and adolescent black/African American females made up 14% of the female population but accounted for 66% of diagnoses of HIV infection among females. Hispanic/Latino females made up 11% of the female population but accounted for 14% of diagnoses of HIV infection among females. White females made up 71% of the adult and adolescent female population but accounted for 17% of diagnoses of HIV infection among females.  The following 40 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.  Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been estimated. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.  Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
  • The pie chart on the left illustrates the distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection among adult and adolescent males in 2009 by race/ethnicity in the 40 states with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. The pie chart on the right shows the distribution of the male population of the 40 states in 2009.  In 2009, adult and adolescent black/African American males made up 13% of the male population in the 40 states, but accounted for 47% of diagnoses of HIV infection among males. Hispanic/Latino males made up 13% of the male population but accounted for 19% of diagnoses of HIV infection among males. White males made up 70% of the adult and adolescent male population but accounted for 32% of diagnoses of HIV infection among males.  The following 40 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.  Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been estimated. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.  Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
  • This slide shows the distribution of diagnoses of HIV infection among adult and adolescent blacks/African Americans in 2009 by sex and transmission category in the 40 states and 5 U.S. dependent areas with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. The pie chart on the left shows the distribution by transmission category among black/African American males and the pie chart on the right shows the distribution by transmission category among black/African American females. Among black/African American males in 2009, an estimated 68% of diagnosed HIV infections were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact, 9% were attributed to injection drug use, and 20% were attributed to heterosexual contact. Approximately 3% of diagnosed HIV infections among black/African American males were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use. Among black/African American females in 2009, 87% of diagnosed HIV infections were attributed to heterosexual contact and 13% were attributed to injection drug use. The following 40 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The 5 U.S. dependent areas include American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been estimated. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information, but not for incomplete reporting.  Heterosexual contact is with a person known to have, or to be at high risk for, HIV infection.  The transmission category labeled “Other” includes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal exposure, and risk factor not reported or not identified.
  • In 2009, the overall estimated rate of diagnosis of HIV infection for adult and adolescent blacks/African Americans was 82.6 per 100,000 population in the 40 states with confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006. The rates of diagnoses of HIV infection for adult and adolescent blacks/African Americans ranged from 0.0 per 100,000 population in Idaho and Wyoming to 133.0 per 100,000 population in Florida and 171.4 per 100,000 population in Maine.  The following 40 states have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least January 2006: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been estimated. Estimated numbers resulted from statistical adjustment that accounted for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting.
  • But is it just HIV that impacts Blacks the hardest?Over 162 million cases of seven common chronic diseases — cancers, diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, mental disorders, and pulmonary conditions — were reported in The United States in 2003. These conditions shorten lives, reduce quality of life, and create considerable burden for caregivers. The following map shows how states compare based on the prevalence of the seven common chronic diseases.
  • African Americans comprise the United States' largest racial minority, accounting for 12.1 percent of the total population in 2000. This population is concentrated largely in the southern states and urban areas.
  • http://mpetrelis.blogspot.com/2009/11/nyt-sf-maps-hiv-viral-load-by.html
  • I read once that ppl don't trust the results of the rapid HIV test the one that gives results in 20 minutes. ppl would rather their blood be drawn. Do you all think the rapid test is as accurate as the others?
  • often ppl say that HIV/AIDS is a conspiracy. That the goverment created it for population control. What do u all think?
  • MALE
  • Diagnosed in 1986 at age 23

HIV in Black Women HIV in Black Women Presentation Transcript

  • Dana Hines, MSN, RN Prepared for Nazarene Baptist Church Women’s Ministry September 2011
  • About Today…  Informal-ask questions at any point during the conversation  Every question counts so don’t be afraid to ask  If at any point you do not feel comfortable discussing the topic or answering questions it’s okay not to participate  Small quiz  Action plan-we will break up into small groups and outline strategies for prevention
  • Hard Facts  There are more than one million people living with HIV in the United States.  One in five (21%) people living with HIV in this country do not know that they are HIV positive.  Each year there are more than 56,300 new infections
  • African American Men  In 2006, black men accounted for 65% of all newly diagnosed cases of HIV among all blacks.  The rate of new HIV infection for black men was 6 times as high as that of white men, nearly 3 times that of Hispanic/Latino men, and twice that of black women.  In 2006, black men who have sex with men (MSM)2 represented 63% of new infections among all black men,  In the same year, black MSM represented 35% of all new infections among all MSM.
  • African American Women  In 2006, the rate of new HIV infection for black women was nearly 15 times as high as that of white women and nearly 4 times that of Hispanic/Latina women
  • Quiz  At some point in their lives 1 in ___black women will be diagnosed with HIV?  (a) 32 (b) 120 (c) 64  (a) 32  By comparison 1 in __ black men will be diagnosed at some point in their lives?  (a) 30 (b) 16 (c) 100  (b) 16
  • What Do People Think?
  • What Do People Think?
  • Math Quiz True or False: 15=0? 4=0? 6=0? 3=0?
  • Chronic Diseases
  • Poverty
  • Unemployment
  • U.S. Population Map by Race
  • Risk Factors for HIV  Unprotected sex with someone who is HIV infected  Multiple sexual partners  Sharing IV needles with someone who is HIV infected  Living in a geographical area or neighborhood that has a high rate of HIV infection  Poverty and being uninsured (50 million Americans)  Homelessness  Low-self esteem  Not thinking that you are at risk
  • Viral Load Mapping
  • How do I know if I have HIV?  Weight loss  Dry cough  Drenching night sweats  Swollen lymph nodes in neck, under arms, in groin  Thrush or white spots/patches in the mouth on the tongue  Yeast infections that keep coming back
  • What were those symptoms again?  How do I know if I have HIV infection? GET TESTED GET TESTED GET TESTED
  • HIV Testing
  • Perspectives on HIV Testing  “There are health clinics everywhere....that’s not an excuse not to be checked. Its not just blacks its everyone...specially with the by racial relationships now days....we all need to be checked no matter what color we r”  “I have 4 the first time this yr. Was scared but i had 2 no n it was free. But going 2 have it done every yr now”  Personally I rather get the rapid test. I don't like needles & the results are faster.
  • Perspectives on HIV Testing  “True...There r free clinics out there u just have to do research people don’t want to take the time to .... believe me I am a nurse I have done a lot of research and studied on this subject....I no there are a lot of black women out there that are but u also have to think about the men to they care it also they also r careless just like all colors are careless”.
  • Conspiracy Theory  “everything is a conspiracy. I don't know if I believe it or not, either way people need to become educated & protect themselves”.  “Government has nothing to do with if they did what abt all the other transmitted diseases and cancer and all other illnesses we going to blame that on them to?....its all abt peoples stupidity and carelessness dnt point fingers at people when u control what happens in your life. U choice to be careless.....not anyone elses fault”.
  • Why do we get infected?  “HONESTLY BECUZ BARE FEELS BETTER......LOL.... I HAD TO BE THE BUTTHOLE..... BUT IT DOES ,JUST BEING HONEST AND PEOPLE GO OVERBOARD WITH THAT BEING SAID.... THEY THINK DEY CAN HIT EVERYTHING BARE... DAT SHOULD B SOME SHIT U SHOUDL ONLY DO WITH YOUR SIGNIFICANT OTHER AND YALL SHOULD BOTH B TESTED TOGETHER....”  “Because, we all lay with each other , with out rubbers, and don’t care right then, we worry about it later”
  • Why do we get infected?  “I agree with ___ to a point but careless sex is not the only way HIV is contracted. And not to make it a black and white thang but black women are contracting HIV at the highest rates so lack of insurance is an issue for black women”  “True I do agree u can contract it in different ways that’s also caused by carelessness also...they have clinics for all that to....just have to research it and like I said no one wants to take the time to do so”.
  • Why do we get infected?  “Ok ...let me just say I am a RN and worked at Planned Parenthood for a number if years where I have tested many people black and white for the disease. I agree carelessness is a factor but there are numerous of other factors. Like low income, lack of insurance, lack of education and fear. Also going back to the government conspiracy and HIV ...don't be so naive thinking that the government doesnt have a hand in the HIV crisis...we must not forget the Tuskeegee experiment where black men were purposely given Syphilis.....”
  • How do we stop getting infected?  Individual  Test early and often  If you are HIV+ enter care immediately  Take medications as prescribed to prevent infection of others Community/System  Offer job training and educational programs decreases the chance of people engaging in survival sex  Offer HIV testing in non-traditional settings
  • What if I am HIV +  Regular medical visits  Medications to keep viral load down  Gynecological exams to check for cervical cancer  Will my baby get HIV?
  • Is HIV/AIDS a death sentence? Rae-Lewis Thornton 1994 Rae Today!
  • Rae Lewis-Thornton The Face of AIDS http://youtu.be/wO5Q4b MEK5A http://youtu.be/rDlYamp JJZg
  • Action Planning  How can we stay safe?  What other measures are needed to prevent HIV infection in African American women?  What can churches do to help?  How can I talk to my partner about getting tested?
  • Evansville Testing Sites  The Vanderburgh County Health Department- 420 Mulberry St (812) 435-5683  Echo Community Health Care, Inc. 501 John Street Suite 12 Phone: (812) 421-7489  Matthew 25 AIDS Services 452 Old Corydon Road Henderson, Kentucky 42420
  • References  HIV among African Americans: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/aa/index.htm  HIV in the United States: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/factsheets/us.htm  An unhealthy America: The economic burden of chronic disease: http://www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com/ebcd.taf?cat=index  CensusScope: http://www.chronicdiseaseimpact.com/ebcd.taf?cat=index  NYT: SF Maps HIV Viral Load by Neighborhood: http://mpetrelis.blogspot.com/2009/11/nyt-sf-maps-hiv-viral- load-by.html 