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HUM1-Podcast-F11-Week1

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  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • FORMAL: I have taught a range of subjects over the years such as mathematics, world literature, storytelling, art, anthropology, folklore, philosophy, world religion, and popular culture. I have a BA degree Mathematics and a PhD in Folklore, which reflects my passion for exploring a number of subjects and disciplines. I have taught for over fifteen years in a number of venues: universities, community colleges, high schools. My central interest in the study of folklore and the creative process: play, humor, and innovation; youth culture; stories, jokes, and informal networks; the reproduction of social class. the study of mediated communication and technology, and its key role in reshaping identity. INFORMAL: I live with my wife in Rodeo, CA, a small town located near Hercules, CA, in a rebuilt home with a small tabby cat and a beautiful garden. I love to run, swim, and bike long distances. I grew up in the northeast side of Chicago in a relatively lower middle-class family with two parents as educators (primary school teacher: mother; community services: father), attended public schools (including a large, technical high school, went to University of Illinois, UC Berkeley, and finally, University of Pennsylvania). I have a deep passion for teaching and learning new ideas, and keep an extensive collection of books at home. I also love cooking new dishes with friends and family.
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • art (n.) early 13c., "skill as a result of learning or practice," from O.Fr. art (10c.), from L. artem (nom. ars) "work of art; practical skill; a business, craft," from PIE *ar-ti- (cf. Skt. rtih "manner, mode;" Gk. arti "just," artios "complete, suitable," artizein "to prepare;" L. artus "joint;" Armenian arnam "make;" Ger. art "manner, mode"), from base *ar- "fit together, join" (see arm (1)). In M.E. usually with sense of "skill in scholarship and learning" (c.1300), especially in the seven sciences, or liberal arts. This sense remains in Bachelor of Arts, etc. Meaning "human workmanship" (as opposed to nature) is from late 14c. Sense of "cunning and trickery" first attested c.1600. Meaning "skill in creative arts" is first recorded 1610s; especially of painting, sculpture, etc., from 1660s. Broader sense of the word remains in artless. Fine arts, "those which appeal to the mind and the imagination" first recorded 1767. Expression art for art's sake (1836) translates Fr. l'art pour l'art. First record of art critic is from 1865. Arts and crafts "decorative design and handcraft" first attested in the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society, founded in London, 1888.Supreme art is a traditional statement of certain heroic and religious truths, passed on from age to age, modified by individual genius, but never abandoned. The revolt of individualism came because the tradition had become degraded, or rather because a spurious copy had been accepted in its stead. [William Butler Yeats] liberal arts late 14c., translating L. artes liberales; the seven attainments directed to intellectual enlargement, not immediate practical purpose, and thus deemed worthy of a free man (liberal in this sense is opposed to servile or mechanical). They were divided into the trivium -- grammar, logic, rhetoric -- and the quadrivium -- arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy.
  • art (n.) early 13c., "skill as a result of learning or practice," from O.Fr. art (10c.), from L. artem (nom. ars) "work of art; practical skill; a business, craft," from PIE *ar-ti- (cf. Skt. rtih "manner, mode;" Gk. arti "just," artios "complete, suitable," artizein "to prepare;" L. artus "joint;" Armenian arnam "make;" Ger. art "manner, mode"), from base *ar- "fit together, join" (see arm (1)). In M.E. usually with sense of "skill in scholarship and learning" (c.1300), especially in the seven sciences, or liberal arts. This sense remains in Bachelor of Arts, etc. Meaning "human workmanship" (as opposed to nature) is from late 14c. Sense of "cunning and trickery" first attested c.1600. Meaning "skill in creative arts" is first recorded 1610s; especially of painting, sculpture, etc., from 1660s. Broader sense of the word remains in artless. Fine arts, "those which appeal to the mind and the imagination" first recorded 1767. Expression art for art's sake (1836) translates Fr. l'art pour l'art. First record of art critic is from 1865. Arts and crafts "decorative design and handcraft" first attested in the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society, founded in London, 1888.Supreme art is a traditional statement of certain heroic and religious truths, passed on from age to age, modified by individual genius, but never abandoned. The revolt of individualism came because the tradition had become degraded, or rather because a spurious copy had been accepted in its stead. [William Butler Yeats] liberal arts late 14c., translating L. artes liberales; the seven attainments directed to intellectual enlargement, not immediate practical purpose, and thus deemed worthy of a free man (liberal in this sense is opposed to servile or mechanical). They were divided into the trivium -- grammar, logic, rhetoric -- and the quadrivium -- arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy.
  • grammar, rhetoric, history, poetry and moral philosophy
  • art (n.) early 13c., "skill as a result of learning or practice," from O.Fr. art (10c.), from L. artem (nom. ars) "work of art; practical skill; a business, craft," from PIE *ar-ti- (cf. Skt. rtih "manner, mode;" Gk. arti "just," artios "complete, suitable," artizein "to prepare;" L. artus "joint;" Armenian arnam "make;" Ger. art "manner, mode"), from base *ar- "fit together, join" (see arm (1)). In M.E. usually with sense of "skill in scholarship and learning" (c.1300), especially in the seven sciences, or liberal arts. This sense remains in Bachelor of Arts, etc. Meaning "human workmanship" (as opposed to nature) is from late 14c. Sense of "cunning and trickery" first attested c.1600. Meaning "skill in creative arts" is first recorded 1610s; especially of painting, sculpture, etc., from 1660s. Broader sense of the word remains in artless. Fine arts, "those which appeal to the mind and the imagination" first recorded 1767. Expression art for art's sake (1836) translates Fr. l'art pour l'art. First record of art critic is from 1865. Arts and crafts "decorative design and handcraft" first attested in the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society, founded in London, 1888.Supreme art is a traditional statement of certain heroic and religious truths, passed on from age to age, modified by individual genius, but never abandoned. The revolt of individualism came because the tradition had become degraded, or rather because a spurious copy had been accepted in its stead. [William Butler Yeats] liberal arts late 14c., translating L. artes liberales; the seven attainments directed to intellectual enlargement, not immediate practical purpose, and thus deemed worthy of a free man (liberal in this sense is opposed to servile or mechanical). They were divided into the trivium -- grammar, logic, rhetoric -- and the quadrivium -- arithmetic, geometry, music, astronomy.
  • “ Skills” are hard to measure, but essential for living a “fulfilled” life:
  • “ Skills” are hard to measure, but essential for living a “fulfilled” life:
  • “ Skills” are hard to measure, but essential for living a “fulfilled” life:
  • (e.g., philosophy, history, folklore, anthropology, psychology, sociology, biology, etc.) to study forms of art and performance from around the world.
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • My home and hearth (back side of house, garden, cat): spaces that exhibit comfort, safety, familiarity, security, friendship.
  • Spaces that are foreign, different, exotic, dangerous, risky, unusual, conflictual. (Papua New Guines, scarification rites, manhood)
  • Spaces that purport to take individuals and groups “beyond” themselves: churches, food, clothing, rites of passage, concerts, dances, technology (prayer, spirituality, community, wholeness, the sacred)
  • Paraphrase : Summarize the key points (no more than FIVE points). Personalize : Share your personal reactions . Question : Ask two or more questions about and beyond the content. Explain why you consider these important questions for the presenter to answer. Disagree : Identify flaws in and raise major issues with the ideas presented. Offer your dissenting opinions & reasons. Illustrate : Come up with real or imaginary examples of the concepts and principles.
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • Seattle Public Library
  • Wonder, engagement, involvement, pleasure, joy, learning, “wow” experience, sensory, beautiful, interesting
  • Forms that are called “art” as such, separated and marked off from other activities in everyday life
  • (for Benjamin, this quality surrounds the "original" work of art, and provides it with a sense of unreproducible "authenticity")
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome to Humanities 1: Introduction to the Humanities, The Aesthetics of Everyday Life Dr. Dylan Eret
    • 2. This course meets all of the general education requirements for: 1. A.A. in Liberal Arts with emphasis in Arts and Humanities 2. CSU, area C2 3. IGETC, area 3 course articulation
    • 3. CENTRAL WEBSITE http://humanities1.wordpress.com CENTRAL WEBSITE
    • 4. SECRET PASSWORD playzone Enter this password to access the FREE online flexbook, slides, study guides, etc.
    • 5. ALL INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND HERE.
    • 6. Week 1 (Opening Class)
      • Welcome!
      • My story. Who am I?
      • Name game & discussion in pairs.
      • The Big Picture : Why study Humanities?
      • The Nitty Gritty : Syllabus & Expectations
      • Guiding frameworks and art puzzles.
    • 7. I WILL NOT ADD ANY STUDENTS UNLESS OTHER STUDENTS DROP (OR DO NOT SHOW UP THIS WEEK).
    • 8. YOU WILL BE DROPPED FROM THE COURSE IF YOU ARE ABSENT THIS WEEK.
    • 9. POSSIBLE ADDS: WAITING LIST STUDENTS ONLY.
    • 10. YOU MIGHT RECEIVE A PERMISSION NUMBER ON THE CONDITION THAT SOMEONE IS DROPPED AND YOU ARE NEAR THE TOP OF THE WAITING LIST .
    • 11. WAITING LIST ADDS (DEPENDS ON CLASS) LIKELY: STUDENTS 1-3 NOT SO LIKELY: STUDENTS 4-7 UNLIKELY: STUDENTS 8-13
    • 12. MY STORY
    • 13. NAME GAME
    • 14. Building Trust: Truth/Lie Game
      • Write down two truths and one lie about yourself.
      • Share this with your group and have them guess which statement is a lie.
    • 15. Example: Truth/Lie Game
      • I have a cat named Spiderman.
      • I come from a wealthy family.
      • I am missing a spleen.
    • 16. Example: Truth/Lie Game
      • I have a cat named Spiderman.
      • I come from a wealthy family.***(lie)
      • I am missing a spleen.
    • 17. 1. Create a gesture & say your name . 2. Everybody in the class repeat the gesture & name. NAME GAME
    • 18. THINK-PAIR-SHARE (AFTER NAME-GAME)
      • Why are you taking this class?
      • What do you think are essential “skills”
      • or forms of education needed for today’s
      • incoming generations of youth? Why?
    • 19. THE BIG PICTURE: WHY STUDY THE HUMANITIES?
    • 20. a field or division of study concerned with the creative process of human learning and cultural activity What is/are the Humanities?
    • 21. The “humanities” emerged from the study of “liberal arts” within ancient Greek “academies” and medieval European “universities.” Educational origins
    • 22. From liber (Latin for “free”), and artem (Latin for “skill” or “craft” in learning), the “liberal arts” refers to the education expected of free citizens. Liberal arts ( artes liberales )
    • 23. Seven liberal arts Trivium grammar logic rhetoric Quadrivium arithmetic geometry music astronomy Image: Hortus deliciarum of Herrad von Landsberg (12th century)
    • 24. Renaissance “humanism” studia humanitatis (“the study of human nature”) history moral philosophy rhetoric grammar poetry philology
    • 25. Berkeley City College Arts and Cultural Studies Film Studies Philosophy Communication Studio Art Folklore Music
    • 26. what I expect that you will get out of this course (ideas, skills, actions, experiences) learning outcomes
    • 27. a subtle process of discovering meaning, creativity, innovation, playfulness, imagination, rationality, judgment, and value in the world around us learning outcomes
    • 28. the fictive impulse learning outcomes
    • 29. words and worlds learning outcomes
    • 30. What “cultural competencies” are needed to survive in a today’s competitive and capitalistic world?
    • 31. Daniel Pink, A Whole New Mind , 2005 “ Six Senses” Needed to Survive Today
    • 32.
      • Design (The ability to conceptualize and
      • think creatively)
    • 33. 2. Story (The ability to tell a story, to use metaphor and to write and speak clearly)
    • 34. 3. Symphony (The ability to summarize and synthesize information, to bring various ideas and people together to work as a team).
    • 35. 4. Empathy (The ability to immerse yourself in someone else culture, and to be tolerant of ideas contrary to one’s own cultural tradition).
    • 36. 5. Play (The ability to imagine, to be humorous, and to utilize game strategies in everyday problem solving).
    • 37. 6. Meaning (The ability to seek out meaningful, non-material activities, to appreciate symbolic culture, and to develop lasting meaningful career skills).
    • 38. 1. Demonstrate an heightened awareness of the aesthetics of everyday life. learning outcomes
    • 39. 2. Apply different disciplinary approaches from the Humanities and Social Sciences learning outcomes
    • 40. (e.g., philosophy, history, folklore, anthropology, psychology, sociology, biology, etc.) learning outcomes
    • 41. to study forms of art and performance from around the world. learning outcomes
    • 42. 3. Analyze and interpret selected works of creative expression learning outcomes
    • 43. such as visual, verbal, and kinesthetic arts learning outcomes
    • 44. in relation to various historical and cultural contexts. learning outcomes
    • 45. THE NITTY GRITTY: SYLLABUS AND EXPECTATIONS
    • 46. CENTRAL WEBSITE http://humanities1.wordpress.com CENTRAL WEBSITE
    • 47. SECRET PASSWORD playzone Enter this password to access the FREE online flexbook, slides, study guides, etc.
    • 48. ALL INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND HERE.
    • 49. READINGS
    • 50. PODCAST
    • 51. ONLINE FLEXBOOK (FREE READINGS)
    • 52. ALL READINGS ARE FOUND ONLINE.
    • 53. COURSE READER
    • 54. PRINT VERSIONS OF ONLINE READINGS
    • 55. Place individual order for $45 (even) at Lazer Images on 61 Shattuck Square.
    • 56. RECOMMENDED PREPARATION: ENGLISH 1A OR COMPOSITION
    • 57. READERS CAN BE CHECKED OUT ON RESERVE IN THE BCC LIBRARY.
    • 58. WHAT YOU NEED
      • Computer access
      • Two packs of index cards (white).
      • Paper
    • 59. WEEKLY RITUAL READ, WATCH, OR LISTEN TO MULTIMEDIA FLEXBOOK OR COURSE READER, AND COMPOSE A SHORT JOURNAL ENTRY OR ONLINE BLOG
    • 60. WEEKLY BLOGS OR JOURNAL ENTRIES 3 BLOGS DUE EVERY 6 WEEKS
    • 61. WEEKLY BLOGS OR JOURNAL ENTRIES READ WEEKLY, GRADED CUMULATIVELY AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER (POINTS ASSIGNED FOR TIMELINESS, INSIGHT, ANALYTICAL RIGOR)
    • 62. WEEKLY BLOGS 1 Point, 1 Question, 100 words (minimum)
    • 63. WEEKLY BLOGS USE ALIAS: (For example, “Dylan Eret” in today’s section would be “DYERB4”) (BLOG 1 DUE: FRI, AUG 26, 10:00am)
    • 64. EMAIL BLOGS [email_address] AND [email_address] Use this email to send weekly blogs.
    • 65. PLAY/PERFORMANCE PROJECT
    • 66. FINAL PORTFOLIO
    • 67. FINAL PORTFOLIO
    • 68. A NOTE ON PLAGIARISM
    • 69. QUIZZES
    • 70. GRADES/ASSESSMENT http://engrade.com
    • 71. ATTENDANCE POLICY
    • 72. PIXEL PALS (ONLINE CLASS ONLY)
    • 73. DROP OR WITHDRAWAL AFTER SIX ABSENCES
    • 74. YOU MUST LET ME KNOW BEFORE CLASS IF YOU NEED TO BE ABSENT.
    • 75. COMFORT ZONES
    • 76. Course Structure (Range of Art-Forms)
      • Visual Arts
      • Verbal Arts
      • Kinesthetic Arts
    • 77. Central Questions
      • What is art?
      • What is play?
      • What is creativity ?
    • 78. COMFORT ZONES
    • 79. COMBAT ZONES
    • 80. TWILIGHT ZONES
    • 81.
      • Comfort Zones
      The Familiar, Home, and Hearth The Foreign, Exotic, and Different Transcending Self and Other PLAY ZONES 2. Combat Zones 3. Twilight Zones
    • 82. How to Take Notes
      • Paraphrase*
      • Personalize
      • Question
      • Disagree
      • Illustrate
    • 83. Intelligent Interruptions
      • Paraphrase : Summarize the key points.
      • Personalize : Share your personal reactions .
      • Question : Ask two or more questions about and beyond the content. Explain why you consider these important questions for the presenter to answer.
      • Disagree : Identify flaws in and raise major issues with the ideas presented. Offer your dissenting opinions & reasons.
      • Illustrate : Come up with real or imaginary examples of the concepts and principles.
      You have 30 seconds to prepare for one of the following interruptions. Remember, your interruption should relate to the most recent segment of the presentation. Your interruption should last for at least 30 seconds and not more than one minute.
    • 84. LISTEN
    • 85. GUIDING FRAMEWORKS
    • 86. the basic structure underlying a system, concept, or text framework
    • 87. 1. Art is (deep) play. 2. Art is (cultural) performance. Two propositions
    • 88. 1. Art is deep play. 2. Art is cultural performance. Two propositions
    • 89. Art as Deep Play (deep) play : an intense form of engagement among humans (and other biological organisms)
    • 90. Art as Cultural Performance (cultural) performance : an aesthetically marked and heightened form of communication, framed in a special way and put on display for an audience - Richard Bauman
    • 91. Classical Cases of “Art” (found in very own course catalog!)
      • Painting
      • Sculpture
      • Theater
      • Literature
      • Music
      • Architecture
      • Dance
    • 92. The “Art” or Aesthetics of Everyday Life
      • Eating
      • Talking
      • Listening
      • Arranging
      • Making
      • Playing
      • Creating
      • Inventing
    • 93. The Problem of Classification These categories of “art,” though they are important to study in their own right, assume a very specific model of cultural production that is largely visual , elitist , and Western .
    • 94. The Problem of Classification “ What I don’t like about the [classical distinctions made by art historians] is the notion that to be art, something has to be strictly for beauty. The arts of everyday life are highly utilitarian arts: they give form to value . That, for me, is what an art of everyday life is, something that gives form to value.
    • 95. “… they give form to value .”
    • 96. The Problem of Classification It’s not about bringing art back into the everyday world, because I don’t believe it ever left. And it’s not about discovering that what we normally consider as art in museums or galleries also occurs in the everyday world. It’s neither of those. It is about the arts of living , by which I mean giving value meaningful form.” - Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, folklorist, NYU
    • 97. “… the arts of living… ”
    • 98. Art Puzzle: Pile of Bricks Consider the following possibility, based on an exhibit at the Tate Gallery in 1976. A person already known, perhaps even famous, as a “minimalist” sculptor buys 120 bricks and, on the floor of a well-known museum, arranges them in a rectangular pile, 2 bricks high, 6 across, and 10 lengthwise. He labels it Pile of Bricks.
    • 99. Art Puzzle: Pile of Bricks Across town, a bricklayer’s assistant at a building site takes 120 bricks of the very same kind and arranges them in the very same way, wholly unaware of what has happened in the museum—he is just a tidy bricklayer’s assistant.
    • 100. Art Puzzle: Pile of Bricks Can the first pile of bricks be a work of art while the second is not, even though the two piles are seemingly identical in all observable respects? Why or why not?
    • 101. BEFORE NEXT CLASS READ: E-Reserves 1a, “Deep Play” (Diane Ackerman) WATCH: “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” (Ken Robinson )
    • 102. Art as Cultural Performance By using performance as an organizing concept, we begin to notice how art acquires meaning in context, rather than as a collection of static objects produced by special individuals.
    • 103. Art as Cultural Performance In fact, performance allows us to see artistic expression as an interactive , intercultural , intergeneric practice which overlaps with numerous fields of knowledge and experience.
    • 104. Art as Cultural Performance Examining artistic contexts and cultural performances enable us to expand the scope of meaningful forms we actually study and among wider populations. All of us , not just the selected few, are already creating artistic forms of expression worthy of interest.
    • 105. More Key Terms genre : (1) a category or kind of artistic communication ; (2) orienting frameworks for communicating
    • 106. style : (1) a way of doing something; (2) where tradition and innovation meet during social interaction
    • 107. taste : (1) the process of artistic selection ; (2) the determination of aesthetic standards by individuals and groups; (3) how we come to like or dislike something
    • 108. intertextuality : the references and connections made between multiple artistic "texts" during communication
    • 109. Genres of Performance
    • 110. Reproducing Art Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction” Aura: the quality of a work of art which changes meaning during the process of reproduction Authenticity: the quality of being unique or genuine
    • 111. CASE STUDY
    • 112. The Quilts of Gee’s Bend (Production)
    • 113. The Quilts of Gee’s Bend (Production) http://www.quiltsofgeesbend.com/quiltmakers/index.shtml
    • 114. For a fuller context, read the online article in FLEXBOOK by Teri Klassen (E-Reserves 4c)
    • 115. http://web.me.com/dr_eret/HUM1_F11_BCC/pages/157.html
    • 116. The Quilts of Gee’s Bend (Display)
    • 117. The Quilts of Gee’s Bend (Dissemination)
    • 118. QUESTIONS 1. Describe the tradition of quilting (stylistic elements, process, etc.). 2. How is quilting a form of play and performance?
    • 119. The Quilts of Gee’s Bend (Reflection) Should art by untrained artists be held in the same esteem as that done by professionally trained artists? Should it, for instance, be shown in museums on the same walls that display art by renowned master artists like Picasso and Matisse? What happens to an art-form as it gets reproduced and acquires greater aesthetic and economic value?
    • 120. Discussion Questions
      • "There's no arguing about (disputing) taste." How do our personal "tastes" in art serve to define who "we" are?
      • How can we tell what a work of "art" is?
      • What happens when it is reproduced?
    • 121.
      • WRITE THE TOP FIVE CREATIVE BLOCKS THAT STOP YOU FROM DOING WHAT YOU WANT TO DO.
      • SHARE THIS WITH YOUR GROUP PARTNER.
      • DISCUSS & WRITE POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS OR REMEDIES.
      CREATIVE BLOCKS
    • 122. 1. Art is _________. 2. Art is _________. Guiding frameworks: What are they?