• Save
Hum1 dancing-f11-online
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Hum1 dancing-f11-online

on

  • 1,306 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,306
Views on SlideShare
702
Embed Views
604

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 604

http://humanities1.wordpress.com 603
http://sz0129.ev.mail.comcast.net 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Destruction of the courts by the Dutch in the early 20th century; dancers returned to their villages where they kept the dances alive.
  • The Master's and their guest found it amusing, while a few plantation owners frowned upon these shenanigans. For their 'Sunday' entertainment, the plantation owners started having contests to prove to the other who had the best slave walker. Transformed into minstrel dances.
  • The Master's and their guest found it amusing, while a few plantation owners frowned upon these shenanigans. For their 'Sunday' entertainment, the plantation owners started having contests to prove to the other who had the best slave walker. Transformed into minstrel dances.
  • The Master's and their guest found it amusing, while a few plantation owners frowned upon these shenanigans. For their 'Sunday' entertainment, the plantation owners started having contests to prove to the other who had the best slave walker. Transformed into minstrel dances.
  • Brolsma’s video singlehandedly justifies the existence of webcams. His squarish head and shoulders are in the center of the shot. He’s got a short haircut, glasses that are slightly too small for him and reflect his computer’s monitor, and cheap headphones; he’s sitting in a dismal-looking suburban room. And he is going for it: rolling his eyes back in his head, shaking his face, shooting his hands into the air with the beat, saluting along with the word salut, gesturing grandly, lip-synching the whole thing with his grand opera of a mouth, flirting with the camera, utterly given over to the music. It’s a movie of someone who is having the time of his life, wants to share his joy with everyone, and doesn’t care what anyone else thinks. In other words, it’s a movie of a total geek. Also, it’s only ninety-nine seconds long, which is, coincidentally, the exact length that it’s capable of being funny—it cuts off in the middle of a verse. ...everyone wanted to be the Numa Numa Guy—to feel that un-self-consciously self-conscious joy he felt in his body, flailing around in his chair and lip-synching a stupid pop song in a language he didn’t understand.
  • Brolsma’s video singlehandedly justifies the existence of webcams. His squarish head and shoulders are in the center of the shot. He’s got a short haircut, glasses that are slightly too small for him and reflect his computer’s monitor, and cheap headphones; he’s sitting in a dismal-looking suburban room. And he is going for it: rolling his eyes back in his head, shaking his face, shooting his hands into the air with the beat, saluting along with the word salut, gesturing grandly, lip-synching the whole thing with his grand opera of a mouth, flirting with the camera, utterly given over to the music. It’s a movie of someone who is having the time of his life, wants to share his joy with everyone, and doesn’t care what anyone else thinks. In other words, it’s a movie of a total geek. Also, it’s only ninety-nine seconds long, which is, coincidentally, the exact length that it’s capable of being funny—it cuts off in the middle of a verse. ...everyone wanted to be the Numa Numa Guy—to feel that un-self-consciously self-conscious joy he felt in his body, flailing around in his chair and lip-synching a stupid pop song in a language he didn’t understand.
  • Brolsma’s video singlehandedly justifies the existence of webcams. His squarish head and shoulders are in the center of the shot. He’s got a short haircut, glasses that are slightly too small for him and reflect his computer’s monitor, and cheap headphones; he’s sitting in a dismal-looking suburban room. And he is going for it: rolling his eyes back in his head, shaking his face, shooting his hands into the air with the beat, saluting along with the word salut, gesturing grandly, lip-synching the whole thing with his grand opera of a mouth, flirting with the camera, utterly given over to the music. It’s a movie of someone who is having the time of his life, wants to share his joy with everyone, and doesn’t care what anyone else thinks. In other words, it’s a movie of a total geek. Also, it’s only ninety-nine seconds long, which is, coincidentally, the exact length that it’s capable of being funny—it cuts off in the middle of a verse. ...everyone wanted to be the Numa Numa Guy—to feel that un-self-consciously self-conscious joy he felt in his body, flailing around in his chair and lip-synching a stupid pop song in a language he didn’t understand.

Hum1 dancing-f11-online Hum1 dancing-f11-online Presentation Transcript

  • “ Make a God Within One’s Body”: Dancing, Ecstacy, and Movement The legong dance in Bali is performed by young women who were once trained in the island’s royal courts.
  • WHAT IS DANCING?
  • 1. Sketch dance moves. 2. Write down name and description. 3. When and where did they learn this dance?
  • “ Make a God Within One’s Body”:Dancing, Ecstasy, and Movement Shiva, the Hindu deity of creation and destruction, is represented as Nataraja, Lord of the Dance, in the 12th century bronze icon from the southern India
  • WHAT IS DANCING?
  • dancing: “ transient mode of expression, performed in a given form or style by the human body moving through space” (Joann Keali’inohomoku)
  • ecstasy: an altered state of consciousness that allows an individual to symbolically “stand outside” of himself or herself;
  • ecstasy: in other words: an individual experiences a exhilarating sense of joy and excitement through dynamic group movement
  • Questions Sketch and describe the dance of your other group member.
  • Proxemics: The Study of Space
  • Choreometrics: The Measurement of Dance Movement
  • Eight Functions of Dance 1. an emblem of culture identity 2. an expression of religious worship 3. an expression of social order and power 4. an expression of gender-specific behavior 5. an expression of classical art and tradition 6. as a medium of cultural fusion and hybridity 7. as the creation of individual artists and choreographers 8. as an indicator of who we are today and where we are going, especially popular and historical trends
  • Dance as Cultural Identity Students and teachers at the National Khmer Dance School, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 1991
  • Dance as Cultural Identity Students and teachers at the National Khmer Dance School, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 1991
  • CASE STUDY: Acholi Traditional Dancing (bwo) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R838J_KafwE&feature = related
  • Dance as Religious Worship The Shakers, a religious group that settled in the U.S. in the 18th century, lived as celibates in strictly segregated men’s an women’s dormatories, but danced together in intricate formations as a form of worship, as seen in this vigorous circle dance in a Shaker meetinghouse, New Lebanon, New York, 1873
  • " Kecak (pronounced: "KEH-chahk", alternate spellings: Ketjak, Ketjack, and Ketiak), a form of Balinese music drama , originated in the 1930s and is performed primarily by men . Also known as the Ramayana Monkey Chant , the piece, performed by a circle of 100 or more performers wearing checked cloth around their waists, percussively chanting "cak", and throwing up their arms, depicts a battle from the Ramayana where monkeys help Prince Rama fight the evil King Ravana. However, Kecak has roots in sanghyang , a trance-inducing exorcism dance."
  • KECAK : a form of Balinese music drama http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGXcnWUqV-Y
  • Dance as Social Order and Power The choreography of large groups need not be limited to dancers. Louis XIV’s “Grande Carousel” celebrated the birth of his son, the Dauphin, in 1662, and gave the Place du Carrousel in Paris its name. This scene involved hundreds of horsemen riding in carefully-designed formations.
  • Dance as Social Order and Power The California Golden Bears win the Big Game over the Stanford Cardinal (thus keeping “the Axe”): November 21, 2009.
  • Dance as Social Order and Power The California Golden Bears win the Big Game over the Stanford Cardinal (thus keeping “the Axe”): November 21, 2009.
  • Dance as Gender-Specific Behavior Tango, a creole Argentinian dance that emerged in the late 19th century, combines art and sensuousness, exploring mutual affection through turning, flicking, flexing, twisting, stamping, and spinning. We witness a lustrada , which came in from the barrios, humorously miming the act of shining shoes.
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXhQNRsH3uc
  • Tango Moves
  • Dance as Classical Art and Tradition Kabuki ( 歌舞伎 kabuki) is a form of traditional Japenese theater. Kabuki theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate make-up worn by some of its performers. The individual kanji characters from left to right, mean sing ( 歌 ), dance ( 舞 ), and skill ( 伎 ). Kabuki is therefore sometimes translated as "the art of singing and dancing." Ichikawa Danjuro XII, a talented onnogata , performs in the aragoto play, Shibaraku (Wait a Moment!)
  • Dance as Cultural Fusion The Chalk Line Walk, or Cake Walk, as it was originally known in 1850 in the southern plantations and later became very popular from 1895-1905 as the Cakewalk with a resurgence around 1915. It originated in Florida by the African-American slaves who got the basic idea from the Seminole Indians ( couples walking solemnly ). Many of the special movements of the cake-walk, the bending back of the body, and the dropping of the hands at the wrists, amongst others, were a distinct feature in certain tribes of the African Kaffir dances. These "Walkers" as they were called, would walk a straight line and balance buckets of water on their heads. Over time the dance evolved into a exaggerated parody of the white, upper class ballroom dancers who would imitate the mannerisms ( namely the promenades and processionals ) of the "Big House" ( or masters house ) that they observed the White's doing. These Slave's would have some fun with such a dignified walking, flirting, prancing, strutting, bowing low, waving canes, doffing hats, done in a high kicking grand promenade.
  • Dance as Cultural Fusion The Chalk Line Walk, or Cake Walk, as it was originally known in 1850 in the southern plantations and later became very popular from 1895-1905 as the Cakewalk with a resurgence around 1915. It originated in Florida by the African-American slaves who got the basic idea from the Seminole Indians ( couples walking solemnly ). Many of the special movements of the cake-walk, the bending back of the body, and the dropping of the hands at the wrists, amongst others, were a distinct feature in certain tribes of the African Kaffir dances. These "Walkers" as they were called, would walk a straight line and balance buckets of water on their heads. Over time the dance evolved into a exaggerated parody of the white, upper class ballroom dancers who would imitate the mannerisms ( namely the promenades and processionals ) of the "Big House" ( or masters house ) that they observed the White's doing. These Slave's would have some fun with such a dignified walking, flirting, prancing, strutting, bowing low, waving canes, doffing hats, done in a high kicking grand promenade. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QifiyNm6jG4
  • Dance as Cultural Fusion: Minstrelsy/Blackface http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ciHJvs9wPk
  • Dance as Modern Choreogrpahy Martha Graham was an American dancer and choreographer who inspired modern dance . S hedding the authoritarian controls surrounding classical ballet technique, costume, and shoes, these early modern dance pioneers focused on creative self-expression rather than on technical virtuosity. Modern dance is a more relaxed, free style of dance in which choreographers use emotions and moods to design their own steps, in contrast to ballet's structured code of steps.
  • Dance as Modern Choreogrpahy Martha Graham was an American dancer and choreographer who inspired modern dance . S hedding the authoritarian controls surrounding classical ballet technique, costume, and shoes, these early modern dance pioneers focused on creative self-expression rather than on technical virtuosity. Modern dance is a more relaxed, free style of dance in which choreographers use emotions and moods to design their own steps, in contrast to ballet's structured code of steps. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmgaKGSxQVw
  • Dance as Popular Culture RECOGNIZE THIS TOP MUSIC VIDEO OF ALL TIME (IN THE U.S.)? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOnqjkJTMaA&ob=av3n
  • VOGUING: a dance form popular in the 1970s and 80s. Voguing began in the Harlem gay scene as a non-aggressive battle between two feuding individuals who chose to use dance instead of violence to settle differences. Voguing often imitated the perfect lines and flexibility of model poses seen in fashion magazine such as Vogue , where the dance got its name. No touching was allowed during vogue challenges, even though dancers would often become intertwined in each others extended arms, legs, and hand moves. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FUMbtkL2XU&feature=related
  • Michael Jackson, Thriller, MTV, 1983 Cebu Rehab. Center, Philippines, 2007 RECOGNIZE THESE?
  • Cebu Rehab. Center, Philippines, 2007 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMnk7lh9M3o
  • Reflections on the “Popular”
    • Why do you think this became popular when it did?
    • 2. Does this dance represent a form of domination or resistance? Explain.
  • KRUMPING http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-zKgjqboE0&feature=related
  • 1. In what ways does the cultural background or landscape affect the dance expression? 2. What emotions were conveyed by the dancing? 3. How did it make you feel? 4. Why do you think this dance emerged when it did? 5. What does “get krump” mean?
  • NUMA NUMA DANCE: Taken from a refrain of Dragostea din tei , a song written by the Moldovian pop band, O-Zone , this internet phenomenon was first popularized by Gary Brolsma's release of Numa Numa Dance onto Newgrounds.com on December 6, 2004. The video shows Gary Brolsma in headphones lipsyncing to the audio of the original O-Zone track while moving his head, shoulders and arms and gesturing to the music in an animated and earnest manner. Brolsma was sitting at his computer filming himself with a webcam , which thus provides a tightly restricted frame of action giving the video and its genre a visually distinct character.
  • NUMA NUMA DANCE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmtzQCSh6xk
  • Questions 1. How did you feel while miming this dance? 2. How does this dance exhibit one or more of the functions described so far?
  • NUMA NUMA DANCE (FURTHER COPIES) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BE3DNJHWFSo&feature=related