Valentine Richmond History Center - Overview

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The mission of the Richmond History Center is to engage, educate, and challenge a diverse audience by collecting, preserving, and interpreting Richmond's history.

The history of the institution begins with Mann S. Valentine, Jr., the museum’s founder, who made his fortune with the creation and production of Valentine’s Meat Juice, a health tonic made from pure beef juice. As did many men of his era, Mann collected artifacts. His collection may have begun, as rumored, with a cigar box filled with arrowheads, but it soon grew to comprise hundreds of objects.

Mann shared his love of history with his brother, renowned sculptor Edward V. Valentine. Mann laid the foundation for the museum in 1892; when he died in 1893, he provided the original bequest for the Valentine Museum, leaving his personal collection of art and artifacts and the 1812 Wickham House.

The Valentine Museum, the first private museum in the City of Richmond, opened in 1898; Edward Valentine served as its first president from its opening until his death in 1930. In his own will, he left an incredible collection of his sculpture, papers, furniture and memorabilia to the museum that still bears his family name.

Over time, the institution has evolved from a general art and history museum to one focusing on the life and history of Richmond, Virginia. For more than 100 years, the Richmond History Center has collected, preserved and interpreted the materials of Richmond's life and history. Through its collections, exhibitions and programs it reflects and interprets the broad issues and diverse communities which define the history of Richmond and its surrounding counties. The History Center is the only institution in the city committed solely to this mission.

The Richmond History Center offers major changing exhibitions, which focus on American urban and social history, costumes, decorative arts and architecture. The History Center includes the stately 1812 Wickham House, a National Historic Landmark and outstanding example of neoclassical architecture featuring rare wall paintings.

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Valentine Richmond History Center - Overview

  1. 1. Overview
  2. 2. Mann Valentine
  3. 3. Valentine Meat Juice Factory
  4. 4. Valentine Brothers
  5. 5. China Room China Room
  6. 6. Wickham Rear Exterior
  7. 7. Wickham Library
  8. 8. Wickham Dining Room
  9. 9. Robert E. Lee Sculpture
  10. 10. Edward V. Valentine’s Studio
  11. 11. Silk Evening Dress
  12. 12. Quilt
  13. 13. c. 1810 Cotton Dress
  14. 14. Quilt
  15. 15. Sally Sue Hats
  16. 16. Women’s Clothing
  17. 17. Boys Pink Short Suit 1924, Lavender Romper 1920
  18. 18. Patrol Officer Uniform Richmond Bureau of Police 1984
  19. 19. Red Dress
  20. 20. Egyptian Building – CC
  21. 21. Capitol
  22. 22. Main St. Spotswood Hotel Ruins
  23. 23. Van Lew House Rear
  24. 24. Reconstruction Leaders
  25. 25. Emancipation Day
  26. 26. First African Baptist Church
  27. 27. Dump Behind White House of the Confederacy
  28. 28. Making Cigars
  29. 29. Interior of Richmond Locomotive Works 115 E. Broad St.
  30. 30. Female Bus Driver c. 1940
  31. 31. Flood Marshes May 14, 1924
  32. 32. Monument Ave. – Lee Monument
  33. 33. Lee Monument Being Erected
  34. 34. Haxall Flour Mill
  35. 35. Bell Tower Capitol Sq. 1912
  36. 36. Flower Market, 6th St.
  37. 37. Sit In at Murphey’s – 1960s
  38. 38. Thalhimers
  39. 39. Rusty Wallice Pit Crew Member – 1990
  40. 40. Line to Purchase Tickets at Capitol Theater
  41. 41. Capitol Street
  42. 42. Forest Hill Park Rollercoaster – Dip the Dip
  43. 43. 17th St. and Main
  44. 44. Tools
  45. 45. Silver Plated Candlesticks
  46. 46. Ballot Box
  47. 47. Jim Crow – Racism and Reaction in the New South
  48. 48. Howdy Doody
  49. 49. c. 1805
  50. 50. Richea Myers Marx – c. 1825
  51. 51. James Armistead Lafayette
  52. 52. John Marshall
  53. 53. Capitol
  54. 54. Richmond – 1840s
  55. 55. Episcopal Church at Richmond Virginia 1831
  56. 56. Washington Monument
  57. 57. Richmond Burning
  58. 58. Lincoln in Richmond
  59. 59. Territorial Growth of Richmond – 1931
  60. 60. Insurance Policy
  61. 61. Shockoe Machine Works – 1884
  62. 62. Virginia – 1858
  63. 63. Tobacco Ad
  64. 64. Meat Juice
  65. 65. Miller and Rhodes Clock

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