Eportfolios:The Joys of Disruption     Darren Cambridge        Tufts University       December 1, 2011
OverviewI. ExamplesII. Definitions and disruptive innovationIII. Embracing disruption through inquiry and     low-threshol...
EXAMPLES
Queensland University of Technology                  • Twelve university-wide                    “faculties” mapped to    ...
• Linking curricular  and lifewide learning• Making tacit  knowledge explicit  – Generative    interviewing  – Philosophy ...
Kapi’olani Hawaiian Values Portfolio• Organized around six  native Hawaiian  values and four stages  of the journey of a  ...
Learning Record Online•   Five dimensions of learning and course goals•   Observations and samples of work throughout seme...
Human Biology at Indiana• Interdisciplinary integration through reflective writing over four  years• Assessing teamwork in...
Accounting at WaterlooA skill that I have developed, but stillneed to continue to improve is theability to say “no” to bei...
Liberal Education forAmerica’s Promise• Knowledge of Human Cultures            • Personal and Social  and the Physical and...
VALUE Intercultural Rubric
Virginia Tech English Education
Discussion• Which of these models is most appealing to  you given the goals of your program and/or  courses?• What existin...
DEFINITIONS AND DISRUPTIONS
History• 1980s: From assessment to learning• 1990s: Digital• 2000s: Interactive
European Language Portfolio• Funded by the European Union• A variety of frameworks for different national contexts  and la...
PassportSelf-assessment of multiple dimensions of language ability according tocommon standards
ELP Biography
Key elements of an eportfolioEvidence of learning• Authentic• Diverse• In multiple mediaReflection on evidence and identit...
• Authentic and diverse artifacts in multiple media and modalitiesArchive • Reflections, feedback, assessment           • ...
Research on Impact• Learning   – Reflective and metacognitive abilities (Rickards, 2008, 2009; Peet, 2005;     Syverson, 2...
Implementation Threshold Concepts• Purposes must be aligned to context• Learning activities must be consciously designed a...
A Disruptive InnovationE-Portfolio “projects … at their most effective … are (invery good ways) highly disruptive. They th...
Don’t use Eportfolios if• You aren’t willing to substantially reexamine—  and perhaps transform—conventional  understandin...
Discussion• How are approaches to supporting student  learning at Tufts—at the institutional,  programmatic, and classroom...
Embracing disruption through inquiry and low-threshold practicesTHE GOOD NEWS
Leapfrogging  Institutionally, Tufts may well positioned to  embrace disruptive innovation because it is• already invested...
Happy Problems and Baby Steps  At the individual level, Tufts faculty can gain  from eportfolio disruption through• Embrac...
In scholarship and research, having a "problem" isat the heart of the investigative process; it is thecompound of the gene...
Three curricula                                         Experienced                         Lived                         ...
Practical Reasoning     Its important for students to learn to     think, to reason, to interrogate text and     understan...
Evaluating More of What You Value• Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are  important but don’t think we can measure  ...
Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes• Measurable learning outcome: Ability to  articulate a reasoned stance based on  eviden...
Connecting the classroom to the world
Low-Threshold Practices• Assignments that support the development of  reflective practice• Assignments that use multiple m...
What is Reflection?• The act of stepping outside of acting and believing to  examine out what it means• A cycle of plannin...
Reflection as an End of Its Own• Dewey: Rigorous analytical thinking• Schön et. al.: Key to professional practice and  hum...
Integrative learning• Students need to be prepared for real world  challenges that require multidisciplinary solutions• St...
Reflection in Design Engineering                • Reflective “Idealogs”                  composed throughout              ...
Multimedia Documentation• Compared to just five years ago  – Many cheap or free and easy to use tools  – Many cheap or fre...
Photostory
Joys of Disruption• Eportfolio as a means toward simultaneously  demonstrating and developing proficiencies• Teaching an i...
Stylus, 2009@dcambridncepr.org/darren (slides here)dcambridge@air.orgBibliography:                                 Jossey-...
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption
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Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption

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Workshop presentation at Tufts University, December 1, 2012

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  • Used in capstone seminar at Portland State –portfolio about development of a year-long collaborative experiential learning project
  • Intercultural knowledge and competence
  • Creative thinking and visual literacy +
  • Not simply a “more accurate” way to do assessment for the same reasons and with the same outputs; certainly not a more efficient one Portfolio assessment of questionable value as an add on to existing practices that don’t embrace its underlying assumptions
  • Teaching as inquiry will make your teaching not just better but more intellectually and personally engaging
  • See also Jennifer Moon, a Handbook of Reflective and Experiential Learning
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHsPm-qWaEQ&feature=player_embedded
  • Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption

    1. 1. Eportfolios:The Joys of Disruption Darren Cambridge Tufts University December 1, 2011
    2. 2. OverviewI. ExamplesII. Definitions and disruptive innovationIII. Embracing disruption through inquiry and low-threshold practices
    3. 3. EXAMPLES
    4. 4. Queensland University of Technology • Twelve university-wide “faculties” mapped to – Languages of disciplines, professionals, and programs – Languages of employers • Short narratives with evidence
    5. 5. • Linking curricular and lifewide learning• Making tacit knowledge explicit – Generative interviewing – Philosophy statements• Understanding self as change agent
    6. 6. Kapi’olani Hawaiian Values Portfolio• Organized around six native Hawaiian values and four stages of the journey of a canoe• Bridging home and academic cultures• Gains in student engagement and study skills
    7. 7. Learning Record Online• Five dimensions of learning and course goals• Observations and samples of work throughout semester• Interpretation and grade recommendations• Moderations
    8. 8. Human Biology at Indiana• Interdisciplinary integration through reflective writing over four years• Assessing teamwork in physiology through reflection and tracking strategies
    9. 9. Accounting at WaterlooA skill that I have developed, but stillneed to continue to improve is theability to say “no” to beingoverworked. As per AMF 131,leaders are not there to control, butto help adapt. In order for me tobecome a better leader, I have triedto understand when I have too muchwork, and even been able to delegateothers to it when they have little orno work. … Moreover, in terms ofsaying “no”, I am now better able todetermine when I have too much onmy schedule and to kindly declineadditional engagements when it isappropriate. As per the feedback onmy mid-term evaluation, managersdo in fact respect work-life balance asit could interfere with the quality ofthe work you produce.
    10. 10. Liberal Education forAmerica’s Promise• Knowledge of Human Cultures • Personal and Social and the Physical and Natural Responsibility World – Civic knowledge and – Through study in the sciences engagement—local and global and mathematics, social – Intercultural knowledge and sciences, humanities, histories, competence languages, and the arts – Ethical reasoning and action• Intellectual and Practical Skills – Foundations and skills for – Inquiry and analysis lifelong learning – Critical and creative thinking • Integrative Learning – Written and oral – Synthesis and advanced communication accomplishment across – Quantitative literacy general and specialized studies – Information literacy – Teamwork and problem solving
    11. 11. VALUE Intercultural Rubric
    12. 12. Virginia Tech English Education
    13. 13. Discussion• Which of these models is most appealing to you given the goals of your program and/or courses?• What existing values or objectives could it support?
    14. 14. DEFINITIONS AND DISRUPTIONS
    15. 15. History• 1980s: From assessment to learning• 1990s: Digital• 2000s: Interactive
    16. 16. European Language Portfolio• Funded by the European Union• A variety of frameworks for different national contexts and languages• Three components – Passport – Europass – Dossier – Biography
    17. 17. PassportSelf-assessment of multiple dimensions of language ability according tocommon standards
    18. 18. ELP Biography
    19. 19. Key elements of an eportfolioEvidence of learning• Authentic• Diverse• In multiple mediaReflection on evidence and identity• Interprets change over time• Examines performance across contexts• Articulates commitments and future aspirationsInterpretation using a common conceptual framework• Connects evidence and reflections to shared standards• Facilitates conversation
    20. 20. • Authentic and diverse artifacts in multiple media and modalitiesArchive • Reflections, feedback, assessment • InteractionToolset • Scaffolding and analysis • Selections from archive • Interpreted and integrated in relationship to identity andMessage competencies
    21. 21. Research on Impact• Learning – Reflective and metacognitive abilities (Rickards, 2008, 2009; Peet, 2005; Syverson, 2000; Cambridge, et.al., 2008) – Student engagement (Eynon, 2009; Kirkpatrick, 2009) – Retention (Eynon, 2009; Easterling, 2009) – Learning skills, self-efficacy, and self-regulation (Kirpatrick, 2009; Atwell, 2007; Hartnell-Young, 2007; – Professional, role, and disciplinary identity (Cambridge, 2008; Hughes, 2006, 2009; Stevens, 2009; Young, 2009; Peet, 2005)• Assessment – General skills, such as writing (Hamp-Lyons, 2000; Fournier, 2007; Loernzo, 2005; Acker, 2008, Yancey, 1998, 2004; Hallam, 2000) – Learning competencies, such as self-regulation and self-assessment (Rickards, 2008; Meeus, 2006; Ross, 2006) – Ineffable outcomes, such as ethical reasoning and social change agency (Chickering, 2005; Peet, 2005)
    22. 22. Implementation Threshold Concepts• Purposes must be aligned to context• Learning activities must be consciously designed and supported• Processes for creation and use must be understood and supported• Students must have ownership of eportfolio processes and outcomes• When brought to scale, eportfolios are disruptive, pedagogically, technologically, and institutionally --Jones, Gray, and Hartnell-Young (2010)
    23. 23. A Disruptive InnovationE-Portfolio “projects … at their most effective … are (invery good ways) highly disruptive. They throw upneeds for organizational change; change ingovernance; changes in the roles of many [faculty], andthe consequent need for [faculty] development,changes in pedagogy, and hence to the nature andshape and form of [majors], and the consequent needsfor educational development support; changes to thestudent’s ‘contract’ with [her institution] … If they areto deliver maximum effect … projects must accept andembrace all of these areas of implication, and no doubtothers.” −David Baume
    24. 24. Don’t use Eportfolios if• You aren’t willing to substantially reexamine— and perhaps transform—conventional understandings of student learning and the practice of supporting it• All you want to do is demonstrate learning, not develop learners
    25. 25. Discussion• How are approaches to supporting student learning at Tufts—at the institutional, programmatic, and classroom levels— different than the conventional model in US higher education? How should they be?• What existing efforts to redefine and measure what you value about teaching and learning could be enhanced e-portfolios?
    26. 26. Embracing disruption through inquiry and low-threshold practicesTHE GOOD NEWS
    27. 27. Leapfrogging Institutionally, Tufts may well positioned to embrace disruptive innovation because it is• already invested in innovative uses of IT to support learning• dedicated to moving into new areas of excellence• adept at collaboration across disciplines and roles
    28. 28. Happy Problems and Baby Steps At the individual level, Tufts faculty can gain from eportfolio disruption through• Embracing teaching as a process of inquiry into supporting student learning• Beginning with low-threshold practices that contribute to an eportfolio culture
    29. 29. In scholarship and research, having a "problem" isat the heart of the investigative process; it is thecompound of the generative questions aroundwhich all creative and productive activityrevolves. But in one’s teaching, a "problem" issomething you don’t want to have, and if youhave one, you probably want to fix it. … Howmight we make the problematization of teachinga matter of regular communal discourse? Howmight we think of teaching practice, and theevidence of student learning, as problems to beinvestigated, analyzed, represented, anddebated? —Randy Bass
    30. 30. Three curricula Experienced Lived DeliveredKathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom
    31. 31. Practical Reasoning Its important for students to learn to think, to reason, to interrogate text and understand it; but that is not enough. Its also important that students learn to act, to do, to perform—but this still is not enough. Todays undergraduates must learn to think and act responsibly, with integrity, civility and caring. Practical reasoning integrates these three habits—of mind, hand and heart—that are essential for the formation of todays students. – Lee Shulman
    32. 32. Evaluating More of What You Value• Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are important but don’t think we can measure – E.g., ethics, leadership, social responsibility• Essentially contested concept (Gallie, 1956) – More optimal development because of contestation
    33. 33. Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes• Measurable learning outcome: Ability to articulate a reasoned stance based on evidence• Makes multiple understandings of outcomes visible• Requires reasoning to be articulated• Grounds understanding in evidence and experience• Puts multiple positions into conversation
    34. 34. Connecting the classroom to the world
    35. 35. Low-Threshold Practices• Assignments that support the development of reflective practice• Assignments that use multiple media and social software to document experience and identity
    36. 36. What is Reflection?• The act of stepping outside of acting and believing to examine out what it means• A cycle of planning, acting, and interpreting• A part of any discipline or profession, but frequently called something else• Eportfolio reflection is reflection on evidence included in an eportfolio
    37. 37. Reflection as an End of Its Own• Dewey: Rigorous analytical thinking• Schön et. al.: Key to professional practice and human thought• Friere et. al.: Understanding and challenging domination• Boud: United cognitive and affective
    38. 38. Integrative learning• Students need to be prepared for real world challenges that require multidisciplinary solutions• Students need to make connections between disciplines• Students need to connect their learning in the classroom to their learning throughout life• Students need to find patterns in their learning over time• Students need to connect their learning to their identity
    39. 39. Reflection in Design Engineering • Reflective “Idealogs” composed throughout the semester • “Big take-aways” • Using wikis and blogs • Including photos, drawings, and samples of writing documenting designs and process • Peer and TA responses
    40. 40. Multimedia Documentation• Compared to just five years ago – Many cheap or free and easy to use tools – Many cheap or free services for sharing• Application to research dissemination as well as teaching
    41. 41. Photostory
    42. 42. Joys of Disruption• Eportfolio as a means toward simultaneously demonstrating and developing proficiencies• Teaching an inquiry and eportfolio as window into student learning• Low-Threshold Practices + Integrative Eportfolio Experiences = Eportfolio culture that produces self-directed, self-aware change agents
    43. 43. Stylus, 2009@dcambridncepr.org/darren (slides here)dcambridge@air.orgBibliography: Jossey-Bass, 2010http://bit.ly/tuftsepbib

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