Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption<br />Darren Cambridge<br />Quinnipiac University, August 23, 2010<br />
Overview<br />Examples and the Proficiencies <br />Definitions and disruptive innovation <br />Embracing disruption throug...
Examples and proficiencies<br />
Queensland University of Technology<br />Twelve university-wide “faculties” mapped to<br />Languages of disciplines, profe...
Linking curricular and lifewide learning <br />Making tacit knowledge explicit<br />Generative interviewing<br />Philosoph...
Kapi’olani Hawaiian Values Portfolio<br />Organized around six native Hawaiian values and four stages of the journey of a ...
Learning Record Online<br />Five dimensions of learning and course goals<br />Observations and samples of work throughout ...
Human Biology at Indiana<br />Interdisciplinary integration through reflective writing over four years<br />Assessing team...
Accounting at Waterloo <br />A skill that I have developed, but still need to continue to improve is the ability to say “n...
Virginia Tech English Education<br />
Definitions and disruptions<br />
History<br />1980s: From assessment to learning <br />1990s: Digital<br />2000s: Interactive<br />
European Language Portfolio<br />Funded by the European Union <br />A variety of frameworks for different national context...
Passport<br />Self-assessment of multiple dimensions of language ability according to common standards<br />
ELP Biography<br />
Key elements of an eportfolio<br />
Research on Impact<br /><ul><li>Learning
Reflective and metacognitive abilities (Rickards, 2008, 2009; Peet, 2005; Syverson, 2000; Cambridge, et.al., 2008)
Student engagement (Eynon, 2009; Kirkpatrick, 2009)
Retention (Eynon, 2009; Easterling, 2009)
Learning skills, self-efficacy, and self-regulation (Kirpatrick, 2009; Atwell, 2007; Hartnell-Young, 2007;
Professional, role, and disciplinary identity (Cambridge, 2008; Hughes, 2006, 2009; Stevens, 2009; Young, 2009; Peet, 2005)
Assessment
General skills, such as writing (Hamp-Lyons, 2000; Fournier, 2007; Loernzo, 2005; Acker, 2008, Yancey, 1998, 2004; Hallam,...
Learning competencies, such as self-regulation and self-assessment (Rickards, 2008; Meeus, 2006; Ross, 2006)
Ineffable outcomes, such as ethical reasoning and social change agency (Chickering, 2005; Peet, 2005)</li></li></ul><li>Im...
A Disruptive Innovation<br />	E-Portfolio “projects … at their most effective … are (in very good ways) highly disruptive....
Don’t use Eportfolios if<br />You aren’t willing to substantially reexamine—and perhaps transform—your understanding of st...
The good news<br />Embracing disruption through inquiry and low-threshold practices <br />
Leapfrogging<br />	Institutionally, Quinnipiac is well positioned to embrace disruptive innovation because it is<br />alre...
Happy Problems and Baby Steps<br />	At the individual level, Quinnipiac faculty can gain from eportfolio disruption throug...
In scholarship and research, having a "problem" is at the heart of the investigative process; it is the compound of the ge...
Three curricula<br />Kathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom<br />
Practical Reasoning<br />	It's important for students to learn to think, to reason, to interrogate text and understand it;...
Evaluating More of What You Value<br />Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are important but don’t think we can measur...
Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes<br />Measurable learning outcome: Ability to articulate a reasoned stance based on evid...
Connecting the classroom to the world <br />
Low-Threshold Practices<br />Assignments that support the development of reflective practice <br />Assignments that use mu...
What is reflection?<br />The act of stepping outside of acting and believing to examine out what it means <br />A cycle of...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Eportfolios: The Joy of Disruption

830 views

Published on

Keynote at Quinnipiac University, August 23, 2010

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
830
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Creative thinking and visual literacy +
  • Not simply a “more accurate” way to do assessment for the same reasons and with the same outputs; certainly not a more efficient one Portfolio assessment of questionable value as an add on to existing practices that don’t embrace its underlying assumptions
  • Teaching as inquiry will make your teaching not just better but more intellectually and personally engaging
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHsPm-qWaEQ&amp;feature=player_embedded
  • Eportfolios: The Joy of Disruption

    1. 1. Eportfolios: The Joys of Disruption<br />Darren Cambridge<br />Quinnipiac University, August 23, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Overview<br />Examples and the Proficiencies <br />Definitions and disruptive innovation <br />Embracing disruption through inquiry and low-threshold practices <br />
    3. 3. Examples and proficiencies<br />
    4. 4. Queensland University of Technology<br />Twelve university-wide “faculties” mapped to<br />Languages of disciplines, professionals, and programs<br />Languages of employers<br />Short narratives with evidence<br />Written communication & social intelligence <br />
    5. 5. Linking curricular and lifewide learning <br />Making tacit knowledge explicit<br />Generative interviewing<br />Philosophy statements<br />Understanding self as changeagent<br />Effective citizenship & communication<br />
    6. 6. Kapi’olani Hawaiian Values Portfolio<br />Organized around six native Hawaiian values and four stages of the journey of a canoe<br />Bridging home and academic cultures<br />Diversity & Critical Thinking<br />Gains in student engagement and study skills<br />
    7. 7. Learning Record Online<br />Five dimensions of learning and course goals<br />Observations and samples of work throughout semester<br />Interpretation and grade recommendations<br />Moderations <br />Critical thinking and diversity <br />
    8. 8. Human Biology at Indiana<br />Interdisciplinary integration through reflective writing over four years<br />Assessing teamwork in physiology through reflection and tracking strategies<br />Scientific literacy and social intelligence <br />
    9. 9. Accounting at Waterloo <br />A skill that I have developed, but still need to continue to improve is the ability to say “no” to being overworked. As per AMF 131, leaders are not there to control, but to help adapt. In order for me to become a better leader, I have tried to understand when I have too much work, and even been able to delegate others to it when they have little or no work. … Moreover, in terms of saying “no”, I am now better able to determine when I have too much on my schedule and to kindly decline additional engagements when it is appropriate. As per the feedback on my mid-term evaluation, managers do in fact respect work-life balance as it could interfere with the quality of the work you produce. <br />
    10. 10.
    11. 11. Virginia Tech English Education<br />
    12. 12.
    13. 13.
    14. 14.
    15. 15.
    16. 16. Definitions and disruptions<br />
    17. 17. History<br />1980s: From assessment to learning <br />1990s: Digital<br />2000s: Interactive<br />
    18. 18. European Language Portfolio<br />Funded by the European Union <br />A variety of frameworks for different national contexts and languages <br />Three components<br />Passport – Europass<br />Dossier<br />Biography <br />
    19. 19. Passport<br />Self-assessment of multiple dimensions of language ability according to common standards<br />
    20. 20.
    21. 21. ELP Biography<br />
    22. 22. Key elements of an eportfolio<br />
    23. 23. Research on Impact<br /><ul><li>Learning
    24. 24. Reflective and metacognitive abilities (Rickards, 2008, 2009; Peet, 2005; Syverson, 2000; Cambridge, et.al., 2008)
    25. 25. Student engagement (Eynon, 2009; Kirkpatrick, 2009)
    26. 26. Retention (Eynon, 2009; Easterling, 2009)
    27. 27. Learning skills, self-efficacy, and self-regulation (Kirpatrick, 2009; Atwell, 2007; Hartnell-Young, 2007;
    28. 28. Professional, role, and disciplinary identity (Cambridge, 2008; Hughes, 2006, 2009; Stevens, 2009; Young, 2009; Peet, 2005)
    29. 29. Assessment
    30. 30. General skills, such as writing (Hamp-Lyons, 2000; Fournier, 2007; Loernzo, 2005; Acker, 2008, Yancey, 1998, 2004; Hallam, 2000)
    31. 31. Learning competencies, such as self-regulation and self-assessment (Rickards, 2008; Meeus, 2006; Ross, 2006)
    32. 32. Ineffable outcomes, such as ethical reasoning and social change agency (Chickering, 2005; Peet, 2005)</li></li></ul><li>Implementation Threshold Concepts<br />Purposes must be aligned to context <br />Learning activities must be consciously designed and supported<br />Processes for creation and use must be understood and supported<br />Students must have ownership of eportfolio processes and outcomes<br />When brought to scale, eportfolios are disruptive, pedagogically, technologically, and institutionally<br />--Jones, Gray, and Hartnell-Young (2010)<br />
    33. 33. A Disruptive Innovation<br /> E-Portfolio “projects … at their most effective … are (in very good ways) highly disruptive. They throw up needs for organizational change; change in governance; changes in the roles of many [faculty], and the consequent need for [faculty] development, changes in pedagogy, and hence to the nature and shape and form of [majors], and the consequent needs for educational development support; changes to the student’s ‘contract’ with [her institution] … If they are to deliver maximum effect … projects must accept and embrace all of these areas of implication, and no doubt others.”−David Baume<br />
    34. 34. Don’t use Eportfolios if<br />You aren’t willing to substantially reexamine—and perhaps transform—your understanding of student learning and the practice of supporting it <br />All you want to do is demonstrate learning, not develop learners <br />
    35. 35. The good news<br />Embracing disruption through inquiry and low-threshold practices <br />
    36. 36. Leapfrogging<br /> Institutionally, Quinnipiac is well positioned to embrace disruptive innovation because it is<br />already distinctive in its approach<br />dedicated to moving into new areas of excellence<br />relatively comfortable with change<br />adept at collaboration across disciplines and roles<br />
    37. 37. Happy Problems and Baby Steps<br /> At the individual level, Quinnipiac faculty can gain from eportfolio disruption through<br />Embracing teaching as a process of inquiry into supporting student learning<br />Beginning with low-threshold practices that contribute to an eportfolio culture <br />
    38. 38. In scholarship and research, having a "problem" is at the heart of the investigative process; it is the compound of the generative questions around which all creative and productive activity revolves. But in one’s teaching, a "problem" is something you don’t want to have, and if you have one, you probably want to fix it. … How might we make the problematization of teaching a matter of regular communal discourse? How might we think of teaching practice, and the evidence of student learning, as problems to be investigated, analyzed, represented, and debated?—Randy Bass <br />
    39. 39. Three curricula<br />Kathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom<br />
    40. 40. Practical Reasoning<br /> It's important for students to learn to think, to reason, to interrogate text and understand it; but that is not enough. It's also important that students learn to act, to do, to perform—but this still is not enough. Today's undergraduates must learn to think and act responsibly, with integrity, civility and caring. Practical reasoning integrates these three habits—of mind, hand and heart—that are essential for the formation of today's students. – Lee Shulman<br />
    41. 41. Evaluating More of What You Value<br />Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are important but don’t think we can measure<br />E.g., ethics, leadership, social responsibility<br />Essentially contested concept (Gallie, 1956)<br />More optimal development because of contestation<br />
    42. 42. Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes<br />Measurable learning outcome: Ability to articulate a reasoned stance based on evidence <br />Makes multiple understandings of outcomes visible<br />Requires reasoning to be articulated<br />Grounds understanding in evidence and experience<br />Puts multiple positions into conversation <br />
    43. 43. Connecting the classroom to the world <br />
    44. 44. Low-Threshold Practices<br />Assignments that support the development of reflective practice <br />Assignments that use multiple media and social software to document experience and identity <br />
    45. 45. What is reflection?<br />The act of stepping outside of acting and believing to examine out what it means <br />A cycle of planning, acting, and interpreting<br />A part of any discipline or profession, but frequently called something else<br />Eportfolio reflection is reflection on evidence included in an eportfolio <br />
    46. 46. Reflection as an End of Its Own<br />Dewey: Rigorous analytical thinking<br />Schön et. al.: Key to professional practice and human thought<br />Friere et. al.: Understanding and challenging domination<br />Boud: United cognitive and affective <br />
    47. 47. Reflection in Design Engineering<br />Reflective “Idealogs” composed throughout the semester<br />BIG? “Take-aways” <br />Using wikis and blogs<br />Including photos, drawings, and samples of writing documenting designs and process <br />Peer and TA responses <br />
    48. 48.
    49. 49. Multimedia Documentation<br />Compared to just five years ago<br />Many cheap or free and easy to use tools<br />Many cheap or free services for sharing<br />Application to research dissemination as well as teaching <br />
    50. 50. CMap Tools<br />
    51. 51. Photostory<br />
    52. 52. Joys of Disruption<br />Eportfolio as a means toward simultaneously demonstrating and developing proficiencies <br />Teaching an inquiry and eportfolio as window into student learning<br />Low-Threshold Practices + Integrative Eportfolio Experiences = Eportfolio culture that produces self-directed, self-aware change agents <br />
    53. 53. Published by Stylus, 2009<br />ncepr.org/darren(slides here)<br />dcambrid@gmail.com<br />Available from Jossey-Bass November 2010 <br />

    ×