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Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios
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Deliberative Asssessment with E-Portfolios

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A presentation given at the Association of American Colleges and Universities Annual Meeting, January 20, 2010 in Washington, DC.

A presentation given at the Association of American Colleges and Universities Annual Meeting, January 20, 2010 in Washington, DC.

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  • Intercultural knowledge and competence
  • Three dimensions, two frames
  • Transcript

    • 1. Deliberative Assessment with E-Portfolios<br />Darren Cambridge<br />Association of American Colleges and Universities Annual Meeting <br />January 20, 2010, Washington, DC<br />
    • 2. Tensions in Portfolio Use<br />
    • 3.
    • 4. Rubrics<br />
    • 5. Liberal Education for America’s Promise (LEAP)<br /><ul><li>Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World
    • 6. Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts
    • 7. Intellectual and Practical Skills
    • 8. Inquiry and analysis
    • 9. Critical and creative thinking
    • 10. Written and oral communication
    • 11. Quantitative literacy
    • 12. Information literacy
    • 13. Teamwork and problem solving
    • 14. Personal and Social Responsibility
    • 15. Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global
    • 16. Intercultural knowledge and competence
    • 17. Ethical reasoning and action
    • 18. Foundations and skills for lifelong learning
    • 19. Integrative Learning
    • 20. Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies</li></li></ul><li>VALUE Intercultural Rubric<br />
    • 21. Reflection as an End of Its Own<br />Dewey: Rigorous analytical thinking<br />Schön et. al.: Key to professional practice<br />Keegan: Essential to challenges of adult life<br />Boud: United cognitive and affective <br />Mezirowet. al.: Understanding and challenging domination<br />
    • 22.
    • 23.
    • 24. Clear learning outcomes <br />Opportunities for students to achieve them<br />Assessment of that achievement<br />Use of the results for improvement<br />
    • 25. Useful <br />Cost-effective<br />Reasonably accurate and truthful<br />Multiple<br />Direct <br />Planned, organized, systematized and sustained<br />Kinds of direct evidence<br />Portfolios of student work <br />Student reflections on their values, attitudes, and beliefs, if developing those are intended outcomes of the course or program<br />
    • 26.
    • 27. Virginia Tech<br />
    • 28. Sometimes they align …<br />
    • 29. Deliberative Assessment<br />Assessment as a means for participation in collective decision making <br />Deliberative democracy <br />Decision making <br />Legitimation<br />
    • 30. Principles of Deliberation<br />Publicity<br />Deliberative system which informs and holds accountable <br />Inclusiveness<br />All impacted by decisions can participate<br />Reasonableness<br />Economy of moral objections<br />Respect for reasonable disagreement <br />Provisionality<br />Openess to changing positions and decisions<br />
    • 31. Scholarship as Deliberative System<br />Publicity<br />Deliberative system which informs and holds accountable <br />Inclusiveness<br />All impacted by decisions can participate<br />Reasonableness<br />Economy of moral objections<br />Respect for reasonable disagreement <br />Provisionality<br />Openess to changing positions and decisions<br />
    • 32. A New Role for Competencies<br />Standardized: Matching performance to a pre-defined set of outcomes<br />Deliberative: Capture standards all stakeholders value as enacted in practice and examining alignment of both student and programmatic performance<br />
    • 33. Competencies in Organizational Learning<br />Standardized: Articulating expectations to students<br />Deliberative: Means for mutually accountable connection between individual and organizational learning <br />Boundary objects: “Boundary objects are objects that are both plastic enough to adapt to local needs and constraints of the several parties employing them, yet robust enough to maintain a common identity across sites” (Leigh Star 1989)<br />
    • 34. Deliberative Assessment<br />Standardized: Objectivist/utilitarian<br />Expressive: Subjectivist/intuitionist (Gray 2002) <br />Deliberative assessment <br />Learning complex and situated <br />Judgment based in embodied expertise<br />Students as “authoritative informants about their own learning” (Yancey 1998)<br />Institutional values and outcomes the result of deliberation based these sources of expertise <br />
    • 35. Deliberative Assessment<br />Student are privileged informants about their own learning<br />Evidence of learning needs to come from multiple contexts, and the relationships between them need to be articulated <br />Assessment should be a deliberative process that makes programs more responsive to all stakeholders <br />
    • 36. Liberal Education for America’s Promise (LEAP)<br /><ul><li>Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World
    • 37. Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts
    • 38. Intellectual and Practical Skills
    • 39. Inquiry and analysis
    • 40. Critical and creative thinking
    • 41. Written and oral communication
    • 42. Quantitative literacy
    • 43. Information literacy
    • 44. Teamwork and problem solving
    • 45. Personal and Social Responsibility
    • 46. Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global
    • 47. Intercultural knowledge and competence
    • 48. Ethical reasoning and action
    • 49. Foundations and skills for lifelong learning
    • 50. Integrative Learning
    • 51. Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies</li></li></ul><li>Ineffable  Essentially Contested<br />Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are important but don’t think we can measure<br />E.g., ethics, leadership, social responsibility<br />Essentially contested concept (Gallie, 1956)<br />No single shared definition<br />Common tradition or exemplar<br />More optimal development because of contestation <br />
    • 52. Ineffable  Essentially Contested<br />Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are important but don’t think we can measure<br />E.g., ethics, leadership, social responsibility<br />Essentially contested concept (Gallie, 1956)<br />More optimal development because of contestation<br />
    • 53. Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes<br />Makes multiple understands of outcomes visible<br />Requires reasoning to be articulated<br />Grounds understanding in evidence and experience<br />Puts multiple positions into conversation <br />
    • 54. Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes<br />Measurable learning outcome: Ability to articulate a reasoned stance based on evidence <br />Makes multiple understandings of outcomes visible<br />Requires reasoning to be articulated<br />Grounds understanding in evidence and experience<br />Puts multiple positions into conversation <br />
    • 55. NCC Competencies<br />Communication<br />Critical Thinking<br />Strategic Problem Solving<br />Valuing<br />Group Interaction<br />Global Understanding<br />Effective Citizenship<br />Aesthetic Awareness<br />Information Technology<br />
    • 56. NCC Graduation Portfolio<br />No predefined standard for what constitutes satisfactory performance in each competency<br />Students exposed to (and assessed with) many models and standards through coursework and experiential learning <br />Students redefine each competency, beginning with “official definition”<br />Synthesizing multiple perspectives <br />Integrating evidence from own experience <br />Taking ownership and planning for the future <br />
    • 57.
    • 58.
    • 59.
    • 60.
    • 61. Three curricula<br />Kathleen Yancey, Teaching Literature as Reflective Practice<br />
    • 62. Academics as Test of Self<br />We intended for curricular content to be an central source of evidence and ideas and strategies, but it didn’t show up this way <br />Class work functioned as<br />A demonstration of character virtues<br />An experience <br />A goal putting aspiration towards those virtues in action <br />
    • 63. Complicating Evidence <br />Link between evidence and reflection distinguishes eportfolios and other digital means for<br />supporting reflective learning<br />Managing information about knowledge, skills, abilities and experiences <br />“Evidence” is the documents included in a portfolio on which the author reflects <br />Use of evidence in practice is more complex than the eportfolio literature often acknowledges<br />
    • 64. Evidence in Reflection<br />Research at Alverno College suggests that, as students become more skilled at reflection, they<br />Draw on analysis of their own experiences rather than appealing to external authorities<br />Reference a wider range of activities and artifacts<br />Research deals only with the content of the reflections, not the evidence itself <br />
    • 65. Types of Evidence<br />Types of evidence in science portfolios (Collins, 1992): <br />Artifacts<br />Attestations<br />Reproductions<br />Mixes analytically distinct dimensions, such as characteristics of evidence and purpose <br />
    • 66. Project Background <br />Portfolio contexts: Integrative approach to learning with specific attention to classroom-based, experiential, and co-curricular learning<br />NCC and portfolio-based assessment<br />Intentional collaboration with University Life <br />Small data sets over two cohorts (spring ’07; spring ’08); additional cohort beginning in fall ’08<br />Member of cohort 3 of the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research (I/NCEPR) <br />
    • 67. I/NCEPR<br />Institutional research teams examining the impact of electronic portfolio practice on learning<br />50 institutions in five cohorts <br />Third cohort focuses on student affairs -academic affairs collaboration<br />US, Canada, England, Scotland, Netherlands <br />Book to be published by Stylus in November<br />More information on website: ncepr.org.<br />
    • 68. An Emergent Typology of Use of Evidence in ePortfolios<br />Characteristics of item used as evidence<br />Agency<br />Media<br />Purpose of incorporating evidence<br />Rhetorical Function<br />Object<br />Characteristics of associated learning activities<br />Sponsorship<br />Participation<br />
    • 69. Matches and Mismatches<br />Reflective description of evidence <br />Content of evidence <br />Local – site of specific evidence use <br />Global – the whole portfolio <br />Match and mismatches yield more sophisticated understanding and resources for supporting portfolio authors <br />
    • 70. An Example: Richard Zepp’s ePortfolio<br />
    • 71.
    • 72.
    • 73. Electronic Portfolios 2.0: Emergent Findings and Shared Questions<br />Collection of 24 chapters detailing research from cohorts I, II, and III of the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research<br />Published by Stylus, March 2009<br />

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