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Assessment institute 2010 keynote

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  • Not simply a “more accurate” way to do assessment for the same reasons and with the same outputs; certainly not a more efficient one Portfolio assessment of questionable value as an add on to existing practices that don’t embrace its underlying assumptions
  • Social/institutional, not just individual/personalized
  • Disciplines and professional organizations already have standards from which you can begin – you probably know these better than I do for you fields
  • Intercultural knowledge and competence
  • Student do have an investment of their identities in the institution and want to see its excellent and reputation enhanced
  • Transcript

    • 1. What Culture Do We Want? An Argument for Deliberative Assessment with Eportfolios Darren Cambridge October 22, 2010 Assessment Institute
    • 2. A Disruptive Innovation E-Portfolio “projects … at their most effective … are (in very good ways) highly disruptive. They throw up needs for organizational change; change in governance; changes in the roles of many [faculty], and the consequent need for [faculty] development, changes in pedagogy, and hence to the nature and shape and form of [majors], and the consequent needs for educational development support; changes to the student’s ‘contract’ with [her institution] … If they are to deliver maximum effect … projects must accept and embrace all of these areas of implication, and no doubt others.” −David Baume
    • 3. Don’t do e-portfolio just for the purpose of assessment.
    • 4. Rethinking Assessment Assessment means making student learning visible so that it can inform programmatic and curricular innovation and demonstrate effect on learning and identity development
    • 5. Looking afresh means asking: • What kinds of learning do we value? • What assessment process do those values imply? • How does this change how we think about outcomes and evidence?
    • 6. Minimum competence versus excellence and opportunity
    • 7. WHAT DO WE VALUE ABOUT INDIVIDUAL LEARNING AND IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT?
    • 8. Authenticity • Finding truth through examination of what is unique about oneself • Enacting that difference through creative expression • Protecting choice as a core value
    • 9. Social Authenticity Becoming an authentic individual is not a matter of recoiling from society in order to find and express the inner self. What it involves is the ability to be a reflective individual who discerns what is genuinely worth pursuing within the social context in which he or she is situated.
    • 10. “Finding the Thread in My Life”
    • 11. Integrity • Consistency and coherence over time (lifelong) • Consistency and coherence across roles (lifewide) • Achieved and asserted through narrative
    • 12. From Subject to Author • Ordering role of institutions and traditions shifted to individual • From being our values, relationships, and experiences to having them • Overarching principles that mediate competition • Thinking about the self as a system you compose and conduct
    • 13. Symphonic Employability • Career identity integrates – Human capital (competencies) – Social capital – Adaptability • Cultivated by narrative - Ashford et. al.
    • 14. Social Integrity
    • 15. Environments for Growth • In both personal and professional domains – Learning as attitude toward life – Supported by inviting environments rich in content and people – Technology as a means to guide and support • Communicated by the portfolios as a whole • Can inform her profession
    • 16. IMPLICATIONS FOR HOW WE DO ASSESSMENT
    • 17. Three curricula Kathleen Yancey, Reflection in the Writing Classroom
    • 18. Competencies • Communication • Critical Thinking • Strategic Problem Solving • Valuing • Group Interaction • Global Understanding • Effective Citizenship • Aesthetic Awareness • Information Technology
    • 19. Rubrics
    • 20. Liberal Education for America’s Promise • Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World – Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts • Intellectual and Practical Skills – Inquiry and analysis – Critical and creative thinking – Written and oral communication – Quantitative literacy – Information literacy – Teamwork and problem solving • Personal and Social Responsibility – Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global – Intercultural knowledge and competence – Ethical reasoning and action – Foundations and skills for lifelong learning • Integrative Learning – Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies
    • 21. VALUE Intercultural Rubric
    • 22. • Useful • Cost-effective • Reasonably accurate and truthful – Multiple – Direct • Planned, organized, systematized and sustained • Kinds of direct evidence – Portfolios of student work – Student reflections on their values, attitudes, and beliefs, if developing those are intended outcomes of the course or program
    • 23. Deliberative Assessment • Student are privileged informants about their own learning. • Evidence of learning needs to come from multiple contexts, and the relationships between them need to be articulated. • Assessment should be a system of deliberative processes inclusive of all stakeholders that makes programs more responsive to them.
    • 24. A New Role for Competencies • Standardized – Matching performance to a pre-defined set of outcomes – Articulating expectations to students • Deliberative – Capture standards all stakeholders value as enacted in practice and examining alignment of both student and programmatic performance – Means for mutually accountable connection between individual and organizational learning – Boundary objects
    • 25. Ineffable  Essentially Contested • Ineffable outcomes: Things we all think are important but don’t think we can measure – E.g., ethics, leadership, social responsibility • Essentially contested concept (Gallie, 1956) – More optimal development because of contestation
    • 26. Liberal Education for America’s Promise (LEAP) • Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World – Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts • Intellectual and Practical Skills – Inquiry and analysis – Critical and creative thinking – Written and oral communication – Quantitative literacy – Information literacy – Teamwork and problem solving • Personal and Social Responsibility – Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global – Intercultural knowledge and competence – Ethical reasoning and action – Foundations and skills for lifelong learning • Integrative Learning – Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies
    • 27. Eportfolios for Contested Outcomes • Measurable learning outcome: Ability to articulate a reasoned stance based on evidence • Makes multiple understandings of outcomes visible • Requires reasoning to be articulated • Grounds understanding in evidence and experience • Puts multiple positions into conversation
    • 28. Deliberative E-Portfolio Assessment • Assessment as both a social and individual good means moving: • From measuring outcomes to putting authentic, integral self-representations into conversation • From consensus to contestation • From proof to inquiry • From authorship to participation with authenticity and integrity
    • 29. Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research • 60 campuses from five countries • Six three-year cohorts • Individual research questions • Common questions • Bi-annual meetings and online collaboration • Demonstrated links to increased student engagement, retention, study skills, course completion, and employability • Two members received 2010 FIPSE funding for project informed by Coalition work • AAC&U VALUE project leadership campuses largely drawn from Coalition membership and results frequently cited in their publications
    • 30. Cohort VI • Focused on assessment that capitalizes on what is distinctive about e-portfolios • Non-negotiable core • Capabilities of the digital, networked environment • Role in accreditation
    • 31. • Interaction of Pieces of Evidence – For meaningful assessment, interaction of pieces of evidence within an eportfolio is more important than single pieces of evidence • Relationship between Evidence and Reflection – Reflection on pieces of evidence within an eportfolio and on the eportfolio as a whole provides information for assessment that isn’t available by other means • Meaningful Comparison without Standardization – Eportfolios enable meaningful comparison of student learning across institutions (and other contexts) without standardization • Material Practices – The material practice of eportfolio composition generates distinctive knowledge about learning
    • 32. Meaningful Comparisons without Standardization Eportfolios enable meaningful comparison of student learning across institutions without standardization.
    • 33. Can deliberative assessment scale?
    • 34. Maximizing return on attention
    • 35. Capturing the knowledge generated through the deliberative process
    • 36. Published by Stylus, 2009 ncepr.org/darren (slides here) dcambrid@gmail.com Published by Jossey-Bass, 2010