Building High Performance Sales Teams - University of Georgia Sales Academy
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Building High Performance Sales Teams - University of Georgia Sales Academy

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The author outlines how to create high performing sales teams and how sales leaders can coach and develop their talent. The multi-generational issues are discussed along with implications for ...

The author outlines how to create high performing sales teams and how sales leaders can coach and develop their talent. The multi-generational issues are discussed along with implications for development of talent.

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  • SalesHigh – Positive: Confident, glass half full, calm under pressureNegative: Discount, ignore negative feedback, ignore mistakes – watch out and listen to customerLowPositive: Concern about work products, use feedback to improve, responsive to feedback - Negative: overly self-critical and take criticism personally, unhappy, tense under pressure, setbacks and inconveniences annoy them – be careful when interacting with customers
  • HighPositives: energetic, competitive, focused on results and success, persistent in face of obstaclesNegatives: competitiveness may cause selling when customers don’t have needs or interests, know it all, and not seek customer’s inputLowPositives: Following more than leading, great team playerNegatives: uninterested in customer, lacking focus, accepting of status quo
  • HighPositives: outgoing, friendly, entertaining, positive first impression, enjoy meeting and interacting with customersNegatives: Less active listening, overbearing, loud, LowPositives:business and task focused, good listenersNegatives: reserved, quiet, somewhat shy, lack good internal networks
  • HighPositives: Warm, friendly, build good relationships, like cooperation and teamworkNegatives: Avoid confrontation, don’t push back LowPositives: Frank and direct and unemotional, enforce the rules and proceduresNegatives: direct, tough, blunt, unconcerned with relationships, insensitive
  • HighPositives: Orderly and planful, attentive to details, ensure rules and procedures are followedNegatives: overly controlling, Not see the big picture, rigidLowPositives: Make things happen in the organization, flexible and open with change and innovationsNegatives: Impulsive and careless, inattentive to details
  • HighPositives: Resourceful problem solvers, focused on the bigger picture, bring lots of ideas to the tableNegatives: downplay operational matters, prefer to conceptualize vs. implementLowPositives:practical and level-headed, hands-on problem solvers, good with implementationNegatives: uncomfortable in ambiguity, focus on details and miss the bigger picture
  • HighPositives: up to date and currentNegatives: jump to newest technology crazes without verifying usefulnessLowPositives: hands-on learner, apply skills Negatives: avoid traditional training and don’t push training
  • Key Strengths:Key Development Opportunities:Stop Doing:Start Doing: Continue Doing:Specific Actions: Complete by When:
  • Leadership/Selling Goals Actions By WhenTeam Selling Goals Actions By When

Building High Performance Sales Teams - University of Georgia Sales Academy Building High Performance Sales Teams - University of Georgia Sales Academy Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Build a personal success plan that leverages your strengths and addresses development opportunities – leader and customers  Assess your sales team to identify talent and create actionable development plans  Effectively help your sales team improve their performance  Turn coaching into an effective day-to-day technique Zapp Inc. HR metrics Session Objectives
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Sales Team Performance Hire On- Board DevelopCoach Motivate
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 8:30 - Welcome and Introduction 8:45 - Personality and Leadership/Selling Effectiveness 10:15- Break 10:30 - Case Study – Ajax Sales Team 11:00 - Developing the sales team 12:30 - Lunch 1:00 - Coaching for Performance 2:00 - Panel: Best Practices in Assessment and Development 3:00 - Break 3:30 - Motivating the sales team 3:45 - Development action planning 4:15 - FeedForward 4:30 - Wrap-up Zapp Inc. HR metrics Agenda
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Growth rates for high scoring vs. low scoring leaders running sales offices over three years was 6% to 13% higher (McBassi & Company)  Poor leaders increase turnover rates – costs for turnover of hourly average one-half annual compensation and 1x – 2x compensation for managers (hiring, severance, training, opportunity costs, etc.)  Senior executives have assessed workforce operating only at 60% to 65% of their potential (Proudfoot Consulting)  Most organizations operating with a 5% to 10% productivity gap that better leadership practices could eliminate (Ken Blanchard Companies) High Costs of Poor Leadership
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Leadership vs. Net Income
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Leadership vs. Employee Commitment
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  You have been hired by NIKKOT Industries Board of Directors to help them improve the performance of the company. The company has been losing market share for the past few years and conducted many studies to figure out what is going wrong. One of the biggest reasons for the loss of market share is the lack of sales effectiveness. The VP Sales has been very defensive about her team and resisted changes suggested by the CEO and others. 1. What are the top 3 - 4 actions you recommend to the Board? 2. What 2 – 3 areas do you recommend that they get information about to help them evaluate the team? Buzz Group
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Good Poor What do good vs. poor sales leaders do?
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Display passion and enthusiasm  Have a compelling vision  Develop difficult, yet achievable sales plans  Hire great people  Lead by example  Celebrate and coach  Communicate  Establish Accountability  Develop each person’s talents  Share excitement  Involve everyone  Identify each person’s motivators Good Sales Leaders:
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Lack energy and enthusiasm  Lack clear vision and direction  Have poor judgment  Don’t collaborate  Micromanage details  Resist new ideas  Don’t learn from mistakes  Lack interpersonal skills  Fail to develop others  Focus on the negatives  Develop poor sales plans Poor Sales Leaders:
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  VP Sales – International Software and Services company had a high performing sales VP that had a history of making the numbers and leaving a “wake” of people in his path. Needed to determine if he could develop the people side and collaborate with his peers.  EVP Marketing (Hi Po) – Consumer Products needed to complete their CEO succession plan and had a strong internal candidate. Prior to promotion to COO they wanted to test this leader and determine if he could become more mentally tough and impact the company’s results without having the responsibilities for day-to-day operations.  VP Marketing (Former Sales Leader) – Global Software and Services company had a high potential sales leader moving to marketing role. The field style of driving and commanding was not fitting in the new corporate role. Needed to smooth out his leadership style and build stronger collaboration with peer group. Recent Examples
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  A leading provider of assessments used for employee selection and development  Assessed over 3.5 million working adults performing over 450 different jobs across 40 countries  Over 28 years of research and implementation experience  Continuous system testing, research, and support improvement  Legally defensible: Never been successfully challenged  Predictive, with demonstrable bottom-line results ranging from improved employee performance to reduced turnover and recruiting expense About Hogan
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Leaders who know themselves . . . Leaders who lack self-awareness . . .  seek feedback in multiple forms  accept feedback  are more successful than those who don’t  act on the feedback  miss feedback messages (blind spots)  ignore feedback they do receive (denial)  are slow to change over time (obsolete)  top-out or derail (fail) Research View on Self Awareness
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved We don’t care what people say about themselves; we don’t care how they answer any given item We study what other people say about those who answer an item in a particular way Identity Versus Reputation
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Identity is the “you” that YOU know (Prudence items): 1. I frequently do things on impulse. 2. People think I’m a non-conformist. 3. I like to do things on the spur of the moment. 4. I never know what I will do tomorrow. 5. Sometimes I enjoy going against the rules. True False           Identity “I am a fun, spontaneous individual that looks forward to starting each day with a clean slate, ready to meet whatever challenges life has to offer.” Identity
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Reputation is the “you” that WE know (Prudence items): 1. I frequently do things on impulse. 2. People think I’m a non- conformist. 3. I like to do things on the spur of the moment. 4. I never know what I will do tomorrow. 5. Sometimes I enjoy going against the rules. True False           Reputation Individuals responding this way tend to be inattentive to details, resist supervision, ignore small process steps, not plan ahead, and rarely think through the consequences of their actions. Reputation
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved You Boss Peers Direct Reports Customers Your key stakeholders
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved The Potential Report is based on the Hogan Personality Inventory Design • 7 primary scales – 42 subscales • Structured around the Five-Factor Model • High = 65 -100th percentile • Average = 36-64th percentile • Low = 0-35th percentile Interpretation • No such thing as a “good” personality • High scores are not always better • Interpretation is job specific • Extreme scores can hinder performance • Multiple scales are used to make interpretations • Represents typical performance HPI Foundation
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Adjustment Resiliency: Stress tolerance, composure, and outlook Ambition Leader-like tendencies: expectations for self/others, initiative, and self assuredness Sociability Extraversion: social pro-activity and presence Interpersonal Sensitivity Communication style: diplomatic vs. direct Prudence Conscientiousness: attention to detail, process focus, and following rules Inquisitive Decision-making/problem-solving approach: strategic vs. pragmatic Learning Approach Learning style: “traditional” and continuous vs. hands-on and just-in-time Describes your typical approach to work and interacting with others HPI Scales (Page 4)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Calm, consistent, & resilient • Handles pressure & stressful conditions with aplomb • Upbeat & optimistic • Doesn’t take problems or criticism personally • Adapts easily to changing situations • Stress-tolerance may be interpreted as nonchalance • Seems unwilling to be self-critical • Doesn’t pay much attention to negative feedback or advice • Appears indifferent to deadlines • Seems to lack a sense of urgency • Unrealistically optimistic Low Scores • Emotionally expressive • Non-complacent (always striving for something better) • Self-aware • Receptive to feedback • Shows a strong sense of urgency • Concerned about avoiding “negatives” • Tense & self-critical • Moody & temperamental • Worrisome & stress prone • Easily irritated with others • Defensive about work • Takes criticism personally • Potentially self-limiting (internal self doubt) Adjustment (Page 5)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Energetic, achievement oriented, & competitive • Leader-like, self-assured & assertive • Persistent self-starter • Confident communicator • Takes initiative • Sets high expectations • Proactively takes action • Overly involved in office politics • Seems competitive & dominant • Doesn’t provide others the opportunity to take charge • May seem ruthless (if low high Interpersonal Sensitivity) • Restless & forceful if not provided opportunity for advancement • Overconfident Low Scores • Good team player • Content to receive direction from & provide support to others • Serve as leaders when asked • Avoids office politics • Achieves results through collective action • Works alongside direct reports • Seems to lack focus or vision • Seems to lack confidence • Seems to lack initiative & drive • Waits to receive direction from others • Seems to want guidance from others • Seems uncomfortable making public presentations Ambition (Page 6)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Socially proactive & dynamic • Outgoing & gregarious • Effective spokesperson • Seems to enjoy working with others • Easily approachable • Visible within the organization; Catches coachable moments • Attention seeking • Distracted by non-productive socialization • Loud, demanding, & outspoken • May not listen well • Interruptive & prone to confusing activity with productivity • Socially dominant Low Scores • Business-like & task focused • Independent • Doesn’t need continuous social interaction • Effective listener • Strong individual relationships • Doesn’t confuse activity with productivity • Overly utilitarian about communication • Socially reactive • Requires engaging • Doesn’t initiate interaction or relationships • Misses out on opportunities to provide feedback • Doesn’t proactively network Sociability (Page 7)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Diplomatic & tactful • Warm, agreeable, & empathic • Encourages team work & cooperation through actions • Earns others’ trust • Maintain relationships • Very mindful of the impact words have on others • Doesn’t proactively confront performance issues • Thin-skinned • Avoids conflict • Tends to avoid conflict • Provides overly politically-sensitive answers • Tends to sugarcoat feedback Low Scores • Seems task oriented & businesslike • Provides negative feedback in a direct manner • Forthright & independent • Willing to challenge assumptions & ask tough questions • Willing to confront others • Appear cold & tough • Can seem critical & skeptical • Tends to direct rather than suggestive • Seems brusque & painfully objective • May unintentionally bruise egos & feelings • Seems indifferent to others’ thoughts & feelings Interpersonal Sensitivity (Page 8)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Dependable, reliable, & rule- abiding • Organized & thorough • Conscientious & detail oriented • Plans work & anticipates changes in workload • Good organizational citizen • Operationally-focused • Rigid & inflexible about rules & procedures • Resistant to change • Formal & over-conforming • May micromanage others & avoid delegation • Difficulty seeing the “big picture” • Over-concerned with “rights” & “wrongs” Low Scores • Flexible & open-minded • Receptive to change • Potentially innovative • Non-conforming and willing to take risks • Comfortable acting on the fly • Not reliant upon convention • Poor planner & impulsive • Impatient with details & supervision • Disorganized & prone to risk taking • Prone to impulsivity & taking action without fully thinking about implications • Tests limits & conventions Prudence (Page 9)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Imaginative, inventive, & creative • Quick-witted • Can quickly integrate seemingly unrelated data • Open to change (check Prudence) • Thinks strategically Interested in speculative ideas • Prone to over-analyzing problems & having trouble making decisions • Impractical & easily bored • Lacks tolerance for the routine implementation • Impatient with details • Poor implementers Low Scores • Pragmatic, hands-on problem solver • Practical & focused interests • Tolerates routine or mundane tasks • Not easily bored • Avoids creativity for its own sake • Has a narrow perspective & neglects the big picture • Lacks imagination & resists innovation • Uncomfortable in ambiguous situations • Prefers to use familiar instead of creative problem solving strategies Inquisitive (Page 10)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved “Upsides” “Downsides” High Scores • Enjoys & values formal education • Proactively stays up-to-date with recent technical & business developments • Seeks out training • Achievement oriented (check Ambition scores) • Seems intolerant of the less-informed • Seems like a “know-it-all” • May lack depth on topics • Easily distracted by irrelevant topics Low Scores • Uses hands-on learning strategies • Applies skills versus learns new methods or concepts • Takes a practical & strategic learning approach – seeks out information when necessary • Just-in-time learner • Views education as something to endure • Has narrow interests (check Inquisitive) • Seems unconcerned with staff development • Waits until last moment to capture relevant information Learning Approach (Page 11)
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Adjustment may not listen Ambition intimidate staff Sociability flighty and distractible Interpersonal Sensitivity conflict avoidant Prudence change resistant Inquisitive eccentric and impractical Learning Approach know-it-all Shortcomings of High Scores
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Adjustment eager for feedback Ambition good team player Sociability focused Interpersonal Sensitivity handles rejection Prudence flexible Inquisitive practical Learning Approach learns through experience Benefits of Low Scores
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved High Ambition Low Interpersonal Sensitivity High Prudence Low Sociability High Prudence Low Inquisitive Low Sociability Low Interpersonal Sensitivity Combinations of Scales
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved For most leaders, the great challenge is not understanding the practice of leadership: It is practicing their understanding of leadership. Marshall Goldsmith
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Based on your profile from the Potential Report …  Leadership Strengths: Record three-four behaviors that you should leverage to increase your individual performance with your stakeholders, especially customers. (What works well in your current role?)  Leadership Opportunities: Record three-four behaviors that you should modify or improve to increase your effectiveness in managing and leading your team and dealing with customers. (What needs to change at the next level for you?)  Stop – Start – Continue: Record any specific behaviors you noted to Stop (e.g., Micromanaging) or Start (e.g., Effective Listening) Immediately and Continue Doing (e.g., Setting High Expectations).  Action Plans: Record the specific actions you will take to increase your leadership effectiveness and selling effectiveness and when you intend to complete the actions. Self-Reflection Time
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Case Study – Ajax Duplicating Products
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Developing the Sales Team
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Sales leaders should be dedicated to hiring “A” players, developing “B” players to “A” players, and managing out “C” players  Unlike any function of the company the quality of the sales people is reflected in day-to-day quantifiable performance  Several methods to help continually upgrade sales performance  Jack Welch was known for his “rank and yank” approach that generated a 28-fold increase in earnings between 1981 and 2001 Developing the Sales Team
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Performance Appraisal  Forced Ranking/Distribution  9-Cell Matrix  Sales Scorecards Developing the Sales Team
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Advantages  Targeted for development  Encouraging to staff  Documents employee performance history  Useful documentation for termination process Disadvantages  Typically not done in sales  Rating inflation  Rater bias  Time consuming for managers Performance Appraisal
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Advantages  Forces managers to make tough calls on people  Continually improves levels of performance  Creates a performance-driven culture Disadvantages  Promote competition  Reduces collaboration and teamwork  Difficult to give employee feedback  Lower morale for employees and managers Forced Ranking/Distributions
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 39 Top talent Top-grading priorities Selling Issue / future top-grading possibilities Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations DoesNotMeet Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Selling Competencies - the “How” Seasoned Pros 9-Cell Matrix
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Key Result Areas – Results that are expected (e.g., Revenues, new clients, etc.)  Accountabilities – Specific responsibilities to achieve results (e.g., Achieve revenues, X number of calls per day, use of CRM, etc.)  Selling Competencies – Specific skills and abilities that are sales focused (e.g., closing ability, time management, etc.)  Personal Traits – Characteristics that help sales effectiveness (e.g., Interpersonal, enthusiasm, etc.)  Sales knowledge – Knowledge critical to selling effectiveness (e.g., Products, proposals, etc.) Sales Scorecard
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Does Not Meet, Meets, Exceeds Expectations  Likert rating scale –  1= Well Below Expectations and  5 = Well Above Expectations  Letter grades – A, B, C, D, F  Pass/Fail Scorecard Rating Scales
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Advantages  Translates strategy into targets and action specifics  Customized to the sales position and requirements  Helpful for feedback and development  Targeted areas for precise conversations Disadvantages  Takes time to develop and implement  Ensure that the right things are measured and tracked Scorecard Rating Scales
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Scorecard Elements Ratings and Comments Accountabilities Selling Competencies Personal Attributes Selling Knowledge Other Information Ajax Sales Rep Scorecard
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 44 Coaching for Performance Brian Sullivan
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 45 Panel: Best Practices in Assessment and Development Kevin Hendrick, SVP Sales, ADP Drew Nathan, SVP Sales, Equifax Mike Allred, CEO/Founder, Allred & Associates
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Panel Questions 46  How have you hired “A” players?  Can you develop “B” players into “A” players and what do you do with the “C” players?  What has worked the best for you in developing the skills and performance of your sales teams?  What has been your biggest lessons learned in sales professional development?  How do you suggest the participants get started?  What resources have you found to be most helpful?
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 47 Motivating the Sales Team
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Three Generations of Sales Professionals 48  Boomers – born between 1946 and 1964 – 80 million  Gen Xers – born between 1965 and 1980 – 46 million  Gen Ys/Millennials – born between 1980 and 2000 – 76 million
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Traditionalists Boomers Gen X Gen Y Foreign-born Generation Z Source: The Concours Institute
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Baby Boomers Gen X Millennial Born Between 1946 - 1964 1965 - 1980 1981 - 2000 Labor force 76m 50m 88m Purchasing With Credit Cards With Credit and Bank Cards Purchase On-line Significant Milestones •Cold War •Vietnam War •Civil Rights •High Divorce Rates •Challenger Disaster •High Parents’ Unemployment Rates •Terrorism (Oklahoma City, Columbine, 9/11) •Flat world •Global Warming View of Technology Master It Enjoy It Employ It What they bring to work Leather briefcase Cell phone and lap top iPhone Role of Career Central Focus Work/Life Balance Always Changing Major Influences Family & Education The Media Friends, Media Sports Stars, More Aware Work Is… Exciting Adventure Difficult Challenge Means To An End Role of Relationships Limited, Useful Central, Caring Global Communication , Media, Technology •TV •Photograph •Touch-tone Phones •Video: Atari, Nintendo •Computer •Cell Phone •Internet •Laser Disc Players •IPOD, MP3 Player
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Sales Reward Types 51  Cash  Time-off  Recognition  Development  Gifts  Enhanced retirement benefits
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Rewards across Generations 52 Gen Y • Base pay • Cash bonus • Expense paid trip with spouse • Additional vacation days • Flexible work schedule Gen X • Cash bonus • Base pay increase • Expense paid trip with spouse • Promotion • Flexible work schedule • Additional vacation days Boomers • Cash bonus • Base pay increase • Enhanced retirement benefits • Expense paid trip with spouse • Stock grant • Additional vacation days
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Rewards Not Impactful 53  New software tool  Meeting senior leaders  Sabbatical leave  Thank-you note from supervisor  New hardware  Attend desired training progream  Tuition reimbursement  Spouse/Partner gifts  Thank-you note from customers  Recognition in peer group
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Effectiveness of Rewards 54  My reward preferences requested – 27%  Supervisor knows what motivates me – 41%  My rewards meet my individual needs – 44%  My incentives motivate me to attain my goals – 47%  My rewards motivate me to exceed performance – 44%
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved How do you get started? 55  Get the base and commission plans “right”  Sales professionals are very unique and motivated by rewards that provide high quality of life and status  Get to know your sales reps – interests, goals, aspirations, preferences, etc.  Time off and flexibility matters  Design your rewards to meet the preferences of your sales team
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 56 Development Action Planning
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Creating your personal development plans 57  Now is the time for you to reflect on today and put some of this content into actions  Select 2 – 3 personal leadership and selling effectiveness goals you want to address over the next 45 - 60 days  Select 2-3 team goals you want to address over the next 45 – 60 days  Record the goals, actions steps, and complete by timing in the participant manual
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 58 FeedForward Skill Building
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Feedback is a verbal or non-verbal communication to a person or group providing them with information as to how their behavior is affecting you or the state of your here-and-now feelings and perceptions (giving feedback or self-disclosure). Feedback is also a reaction by others, usually in terms of their feelings and perceptions, as to how your behavior is affecting them (receiving feedback). What is Feedback?
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Asking others for input increases expectations you will change.  If you do not change after asking, you are perceived even more negatively.  You will not change what you don’t believe needs changing.  Rather then accept criticism, we tend to denounce and “shoot the messenger.”  All perceptions are reality.  Learn to balance counterproductive reactions to feedback.  Change begins with acceptance of feedback. Joe Folkman’s Book on Feedback Reacting to Feedback
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved FeedForward is “feedback in the opposite direction.” It involves asking someone how you can get better at something you want to improve and thanking them. What is FeedForward?
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Asking allows us to enlarge our interactions with people who may have useful ideas  Most people like to help others, but they hold back because they think it is intrusive to help someone who has not asked for it FeedForward Forces Us To Ask for Help
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved  Let go of the past  Be helpful and supportive, not cynical, critical and judgmental  Tell the truth  Pick something to improve yourself FeedForward Groundrules
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 1. Pick 1-2 behaviors you would like to change. These behaviors would make significant, positive differences in your leadership/selling effectiveness. 2. Describe this behavior to 3-5 stakeholders. For example: “I want to improve my close rates.” 3. Ask for FeedForward suggestions for the future that might help you achieve a positive change in the selected behaviors. 4. Listen attentively to the suggestions and take notes. Don’t critique or complement the suggestions. 5. Thank the stakeholder for their suggestions. 6. Ask the stakeholder what he/she would like to change (optional). Provide FeedForward suggestions to help change. Say, “You are welcome,” when thanked for the suggestions. 7. Note: As you repeat this process with the same stakeholders, you can start the subsequent sessions with: “Based upon my behavior last month, what ideas do you have for me next month?” FeedForward Process
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 1. Select 1-2 areas you want to improve upon and record these in the workbook 2. For the next 15 minutes, pair up with as many participants as you can and go through the feedforward process 3. Your deliverable for this segment is to accumulate a list of suggestions for the 1-2 areas you want to address 4. BEGIN! FeedForward Skill Practice
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Feedback FeedForward Provider Judge Coach Receiver “Kill the messenger” Open Direction Past Future Relationship Marginal Collaborative Helpfulness Limited Powerful Focus Things done wrong Things do right Feedback vs. FeedForward
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved 67 Wrap-Up
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Summary 68  Personal leadership and selling effectiveness from personality  Improving sales team performance  Coaching for development  Motivating the sales team  Personal action planning  FeedForward process
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved CPS Contact Information 69 Please send feedback or questions to: Dave Brookmire – 404-593-5001 dbrookmire@cpstrat.com www.cpstrat.com
  • Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved Representative Clients Copyright © 2010, Corporate Performance Strategies, All Rights Reserved