Citation and plagiarism
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BIU English 106: How to cite with MLA style. How to avoid plagiarism.

BIU English 106: How to cite with MLA style. How to avoid plagiarism.

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Citation and plagiarism Citation and plagiarism Presentation Transcript

  • BIU English 106 Citation and Plagiarism Introduction to Literary Forms and Critical Writing I Dr. Daniel Feldman danielb.feldman@gmail.com
  • Writing Blurbs 6 • I tend to think of fiction as being mainly about characters and human beings and inner experience, whereas essays can be much more expository and didactic and more about subjects or ideas. If some people read my fiction and see it as fundamentally about philosophical ideas, what it probably means is that these are pieces where the characters are not as alive and interesting as I meant them to be. --David Foster Wallace, novelist
  • Citation • What is citation? – Reference to a book, paper, website, or author quoted in a scholarly work. • Why cite?
  • Why cite? What few undergraduates grasp, given that money is paid in exchange for their heads being cracked open and education poured in, is that you don’t purchase ideas with tuition. The people you read actually own their ideas, and deserve credit for them. Think of it as idea rental: you are free to use any ideas you want, but you must distinguish between an idea, or point of analysis, that is actually yours and one that has been offered up by someone else whose book you have read. Potter, Claire. “If I Had College-Age Children.” The Chronicle.com. 7 Dec. 2011. Web.
  • Why cite? “Your research paper is a collaboration between you and your sources. To be fair and ethical, you must acknowledge your debt to the writers of those sources. If you don’t, you commit plagiarism, a serious academic offense” (Hacker 376). Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. A Writer’s Reference. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011. Print.
  • What is plagiarism? 1) 2) 3) Failing to cite direct quotations and borrowed ideas. Failing to enclose borrowed language in quotation marks. Failing to put summaries and paraphrases in your own words. (ibid.)
  • Plagiarism or Not? The great fear of the Romans was of revolt. . . . For many Romans it was impossible to see a Jew bearing arms as anything but an incipient uprising, complete with arson, murder, pillage, and rapine. The empire was haunted throughout by a deep and horrible fear of insurrection. – From Cornish, Dudley Taylor. The Sable Arm. Lawrence: UP of Kansas, 1987. Print. – [The source passage is from page 158.] • Historian Dudley Taylor Cornish observes that many Romans were so terrified of revolts that the sight of armed Jews filled them with fear (158). – Plagiarized?
  • Plagiarism or Not? The great fear of the Romans was of revolt. . . . For many Romans it was impossible to see a Jew bearing arms as anything but an incipient uprising, complete with arson, murder, pillage, and rapine. The empire was haunted throughout by a deep and horrible fear of insurrection. – From Cornish, Dudley Taylor. The Sable Arm. Lawrence: UP of Kansas, 1987. Print. – [The source passage is from page 158.] • Many Romans found it impossible to see a Jew bearing arms as anything but an incipient uprising complete with arson, murder, pillage, and rapine. – Plagiarized?
  • Plagiarism or Not? The great fear of the Romans was of revolt. . . . For many Romans it was impossible to see a Jew bearing arms as anything but an incipient uprising, complete with arson, murder, pillage, and rapine. The empire was haunted throughout by a deep and horrible fear of insurrection. – From Cornish, Dudley Taylor. The Sable Arm. Lawrence: UP of Kansas, 1987. Print. – [The source passage is from page 158.] • Historian Dudley Taylor Cornish asserts that "for many Romans it was impossible to see a Jew bearing arms as anything but an incipient uprising complete with arson, murder, pillage, and rapine" (158). – Plagiarized?
  • How does one cite? MLA parenthetical style Two parts: 1) Parenthetical citations in essay 2) Works cited list after essay
  • How to cite by page # • 1) Sample statement in essay text: – Medieval Europe was a place both of “raids, pillages, slavery, and extortion” and of “traveling merchants, monetary exchange, towns if not cities, and active markets in grain” (Townsend 10). » Close quotes, place author name and page number in parentheses with no additional punctuation, final period punctuation. – Townsend argues that Medieval Europe was a place both of “raids, pillages, slavery, and extortion” and of “traveling merchants, monetary exchange, towns if not cities, and active markets in grain” (10).
  • How to cite by page # • 2) Sample standard reference for works cited list: Townsend, Michael. The Story of the Soil. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2001. Townsend, Michael. “Medieval Betrayals: Land Plots and Empire.” The Journal of Medieval Literature 21.1 (2001): 7-26.
  • How to cite by URL/title • 1) Sample citations in essay where possible: – Kurosawa’s Rashomon was one of the first Japanese films to attract a Western audience. – Chan considers the same topic in the context of Hong Kong cinema. » Essay provides maximum available information without parenthetical citation. » Often preferable to include a name in the text. – The utilitarianism of the Victorians “attempted to reduce decision-making about human actions to a ‘felicific calculus’” (Everett). » Author cited but no page number available.
  • Sample citations by URL/title • 2) Sample references for digital / film sources in works cited list: – Chan, Evans. “Postmodernism and Hong Kong Cinema.” Postmodern Culture 10.3 (2000): n. pag. Project Muse. Web. – Everett, Glenn. “Utilitarianism.” The Victorian Web. 11 Oct. 2002. Web. – Kurosawa, Akira, dir. Rashomon. Daiei, 1950. Film.
  • Use Quotations Judiciously • When the quotation is especially vivid or expressive. • When technical accuracy is necessary. • When it is important to cite a contentious perspective verbatim. • When the expert’s words lend gravitas to an argument. • When the quotation’s exact words pertain to your analysis. – (Hacker 380)