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106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
106 slides Nov 21 & 23
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106 slides Nov 21 & 23

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  • 1. BIU English 106 Slide set #4: Nov. 21 & 23 Introduction to Literary Forms and Critical Writing I Dr. Daniel Feldman [email_address]
  • 2. Writing Blurbs 5
    • Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.
    • --Dave Barry, humorist
  • 3. Vocabulary from last week
    • deride / derision
    • scorn
    • vacillate
    • implicit / imply / implied
    • ominous
    • epiphany
  • 4. Outlining Essay Structure
    • Formulate a focused and persuasive thesis.
    • Choose sources that relate most closely to your argument and put others aside.
    • Plan your essay
        • an introduction
        • sections that organize and develop your argument
        • and a conclusion
  • 5. Outlining Essay Structure
    • Plan your essay
        • an introduction
        • sections that organize and develop your argument
        • and a conclusion
          • Write down the major points you want to make in each section
            • This is your outline
          • Use the outline as a guide for drafting the paper, but plan to reconsider the structure of the paper after you have a working draft
            • Next week: Working drafts
  • 6. Purposes of an Outline
    • An outline will help you to get an overall view of your paper and, perhaps more important, to figure out how each section of the paper relates to the others.
    • An outline can help you to see the logical progression of your argument and identify which segments need more research and which elements you should revise.
  • 7. Parts of an Outline
  • 8. Sample Outline on Families Assignment --From the MLA Handbook
  • 9. Sample Outline on Families Sample Thesis
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Topic Sentences
    • State the main point of a paragraph in a topic sentence: a summary of what to expect in the following ‘graph of text.
      • A body paragraph clusters information supporting your thesis.
      • Every ‘graph sentence relates to the topic sentence and serves to unify the paragraph.
        • EXAMPLE: “Music also plays an important background role in Dubliners .”
          • In an essay on aesthetic motifs in the book
          • Followed by examples: harp in “Two Gallants,” distant music in “The Dead”
  • 13. Exposition
    • Exposition is the author laying out the situation by providing background information to the audience about the plot, characters, setting, and theme.
      • In analyzing exposition, ask what details did the author have to present at the outset to get the reader involved in the story?
  • 14. Joyce on Dubliners
    • My intention was to write a chapter of the moral history of my country and I chose Dublin for the scene because that city seemed to me the centre of paralysis . I have tried to present it to the indifferent public under four of its aspects: childhood , adolescence , maturity and public life . The stories are arranged in this order. I have written it for the most part in a style of scrupulous meanness and with the conviction that he is a very bold man who dares to alter in the presentment, still more to deform, whatever he has seen and heard. - Letters II. 134
  • 15. Paralysis
    • What examples does the text indicate of paralysis in Dublin life?
      • Symbolic: what elements or motifs symbolize paralysis?
      • Thematic: how is paralysis evident among Joyce’s characters?
        • “ Trivial things”: realistic objects acquire heightened significance
  • 16. Suggested Essay Topics
    • Who is a victim and who an abuser in “The Boarding House”?
    • What role does “seeing” play in “Araby”?
    • Why does Eveline ultimately choose to stay?
    • How is the gulf between men and women represented in one or more stories?
    • Show how the conclusion of one or more of the stories is foreshadowed.
    • What accounts for the order of the narration?
  • 17. For next week 30.11
    • No class Monday: Library visits instead
    • For Wednesday 30.11
      • Write: first drafts of Dubliners essays, introductions and outlines will be collected
      • Read: Atwood, “Happy Endings,” and Hemingway, “Indian Camp”
        • Online
        • On reserve in library for photocopying

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