Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Lab 12 blood film
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Lab 12 blood film

7,502

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
7,502
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
263
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Thick at one end, thinning out to a smooth rounded feather edge. Should occupy 2/3 of the total slide area. Should not touch any edge of the slide. Should be margin free, except for point of application
  • The purpose of fixation is to preserve tissues permanently in as life-like a state as possible. Fixation should be carried out as soon as possible after removal of the tissues (in the case of surgical pathology) or soon after death (with autopsy) to prevent autolysis.
  • The purpose of fixation is to preserve tissues permanently in as life-like a state as possible. Fixation should be carried out as soon as possible after removal of the tissues (in the case of surgical pathology) or soon after death (with autopsy) to prevent autolysis.
  • Because the aqueous dye solutions were unstable, methanol was introduced as a solvent, and William Boog Leishman [7] and James Homer Wright [8] advocated use of methanol as a fixative prior to staining. Gustav Giemsa improved this technique by standardizing the dye solutions and adding glycerol to increase stability.
  • Blowing: driving: pushing
  • Scratch
  • Transcript

    • 1. Blood Film Technique Making Blood film Practical Parasitology 2 nd Stage Lab 12: Blood Film University of Sulaimani School of Science Department of Biology
    • 2. OBJECTIVES
      • Students should be able to:
        • Make a good blood film
        • Stain blood film
        • Identify the diagnostic stages of a blood-dwelling parasites
    • 3. Blood Film
      • The most commonly used technique for blood examination is blood film.
      • A very thin layer of blood spread over a microscope slide
      • Allows the various types of blood cells to be seen and identified.
      • Blood smear plays an important role in diagnosing a wide range of illnesses.
        • Includes detection of blood-borne parasites, like malaria.
    • 4. Collection of Blood Smears 5. Touch the drop of blood to the slide from below. 4. Slide must always be grasped by its edges. 2. Puncture at the side of the ball of the finger. 3. Gently squeeze toward the puncture site. 1. The second or third finger is usually selected and cleaned.
    • 5. Preparing thick and thin films 1. Touch one drop of blood to a clean slide. 2. Spread the first drop to make a 1 cm circle. 3. Touch a fresh drop of blood to the edge of another slide. 6. Wait for both to dry before fixing and staining. 5. Pull the drop of blood across the first slide in one motion. 4. Touch the drop of blood by spreader slide at 45  degree angle.
    • 6. Blood Film Preparation
    • 7. Thick Blood Film preparation Thin Blood film preparation
    • 8. Thick and Thin Films
      • THICK FILM
        • lysed RBCs
        • larger volume
        • 0.25 μl blood/100 fields
        • more difficult to diagnose species
        • parasite density
      • THIN FILM
        • Intact RBCs
        • smaller volume
        • 0.005 μl blood/100 fields
        • good species differentiation
        • low density infections can be missed
    • 9. Staining
      • Staining is a biochemical technique of adding a specific dye to a substrate (DNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates) to qualify or quantify the presence of a specific compound.
      • Stains and dyes are frequently used in biology and medicine to highlight structures in biological tissues for viewing, often with the aid of different microscopes .
    • 10. Staining
      • Romanowsky stains are based on a combination of eosine and methylene blue
      • Wright's stain, Leishman stain and Giemsa stain.
      • All are used to examine blood or bone marrow samples.
      • Nuclei stained dark blue/violet, erythrocytes pale pink & cytoplasm pale blue
      • All are also suited to examination of blood to detect blood-borne parasites like malaria.
    • 11. Staining Procedure
      • Thin smear are air dried.
      • Overflow the smear with Leishman stain (1 ml) for 1-5 min.
      • Add a double amount of distilled water and mix the stain by blowing the fluid.
      • Leave the mixture on the slide for 10-15 min.
      • Wash off by slow-running water to remove the extra liquid stain.
      • Stand slide on end, and let dry in air.
      • Examination
    • 12. Leishman stain
      • Methylene blue
      • Basic dye
      • Blue-purple colour
      • Stains nuclei, ribosomes & rough ER (DNA & RNA - acidic)
      • Structures that stain with methylene blue are termed basophilic
      • Eosin
      • Acid dye
      • Pink-red colour
      • Stains most cytoplasm proteins which are mostly basic
      • Structures that stain with eosin are termed eosinophilic
    • 13. Examination
    • 14. Microfilaria Microfilaria
    • 15. References
      • http://www.dpd.cdc.gov/dpdx/
      • http://www.stanford.edu/group/parasites/Parasites2006/
      • http://www.bsieducation.org/Education/14-19/topic-areas/applied-science/standard-procedure/sp-0002-1.shtml
      • http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~bioslabs/studies/studies.htm
      • Clodfelter, R.L. (1986). The peripheral smear. Emerg. Med. Clin. North. Am. 4(1):59-74.
    • 16. Next Lab Ciliates: Balantidium coli

    ×