Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Literary Terms in A Midsummer Night's Dream
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Literary Terms in A Midsummer Night's Dream

36,801
views

Published on

An introduction to figurative language and soliloquies in A Midsummer Night's Dream

An introduction to figurative language and soliloquies in A Midsummer Night's Dream

Published in: Education, Technology

1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • This helped me with at least three literary devices!
    :D
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
36,801
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
214
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Shakespearean Drama: Critical Literary Concepts
  • 2. I. Figurative Language
  • 3. A. Definition
    • Describes something by comparing it to something else.
      • Comparison is not literal – uses imagination
      • Uses images in the comparison
      • The two things are different enough so that their similarities, when pointed out, are interesting, unique, or surprising.
  • 4. 2. Three Main Types
    • Metaphor
      • Direct comparison of two unlike things that have something in common.
      • Does not use “like” or as” – says one thing IS another thing.
    “ But earthlier happy is the rose distilled , Than that which, withering on the virgin thorn , Grows, lives, and dies in single blessedness ” (I.i. 76-78) Here, Theseus refers to a married woman as a “rose distilled” to emphasize that a married woman has a purpose in life. Here, Theseus refers to a nun as a rose that grows, lives, and dies all alone on the vine, to emphasize that such a woman lacks a real purpose in life and is all alone.
  • 5.
    • b. Simile
    • i. Indirect comparison of two unlike things.
    • ii. Uses “like” or “as” – does NOT say that one object IS the other thing.
    “ To you your father should be as a god , One that composed your beauties; yea and one To whom you are but as a form in wax By him imprinted and within his power To leave the figure or disfigure it” (I.i. 47-51) To convince Hermia that she should listen to her dad, Theseus compares him to a god. He then adds emphasis by comparing Hermia to a wax figure that her father carved. He says her dad has the power to leave the statue complete, or destroy it.
  • 6.
    • c. Personification
    • i. Gives human qualities to an inanimate object or idea.
    • ii. Qualities include emotions, desires, sensations, speech, gestures, etc.
    “ And then the moon , like to a silver bow New-bent in heaven, shall behold the night Of our solemnities” (I.i. 8-10). Here, Hippolyta emphasizes her unhappiness by saying the moon (Artemis) will witness what will happen. Ex: “But earthlier happy is the rose distilled , Than that which, withering on the virgin thorn, Grows, lives, and dies in single blessedness” (I.i. 76-78) Returning to our earlier metaphor example, Theseus says that the distilled rose is happier than the one that never gets used. Giving a flower emotions is personification. This emphasizes his view that Hermia will be happier if she marries Demetrius than if she becomes a nun.
  • 7. II. Soliloquy
  • 8.
    • Definition
      • A speech given by someone alone on stage (soli = alone, loquere = Latin for “to speak”)
      • The character talks to him/herself, not to any other characters.
    • Serves several main purposes:
      • Reveals a character’s true inner thoughts and feelings
      • Can give insights into the plot – plans the character is making, ideas he / she has
      • In other words, it allows the audience to learn things that they would never otherwise learn.
  • 9. C. Key soliloquies in MND
      • Helena, Act I.i
      • Oberon, Act II.i
      • Bottom, Act IV.ii