Dorset Fire & Rescue Service - Using Social Media 2013

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A presentation that explores some new and interesting avenues for social media use by Dorset Fire Rescue Service (DFRS). Used in a presentation to Silver and Gold Commanders this PPT highlights the use of social media by commercial and public sector companies and how that might translate into the roll out of a new social media strategy by DFRS.

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  • I would like to take you back in time for a moment – not too far – just 10 or 15 years.To the days when the Internet was like this – there was a desktop PC (nobody had developed the laptop yet), in order to access the Internet you needed a modem, a telephone cable stretched across the room - And you will probably remember this little noise.Sometimes it connected first time, sometimes it didn’t. The other thing to remember was that whilst you were connected you couldn’t take any calls because you were using the same telephone line.
  • Today we see all manner of devices connecting to the Internet.... There are hardly any cables – and certainly none of those dial up noisesWe have smartphones, games consoles, tablets, watches, that all connect to the Internet over WiFi – there is Smart TV that has web access – I can even set my SKY box to record the football from here if I have forgotten to do it at home.
  • There are even cars that not only have SatNav but also internet access – you obviously need to be stationery to use it ;0)
  • Even bus companies have seen an opportunity to differentiate by offering free WiFi to its passengers.So now they can enjoy wireless web browsing whilst sat in a traffic jam.The world is changing!First Bus company offer free Wifi on their buses whilst they tweet and Facebook delays and timetables
  • We have come a long way from the early days of the Internet – when we would need to physically go to the computer to use the Internet or send an email.Today we live in a world where you switch on your phone, open your tablet and you are connected straight away.
  • Today, social media and mobile media are intimately connectedEvery social media platform has a mobile componentWhat was once an item that was affordable by high-earners is now an every day deviceText messaging and phone calls remain the most popular forms of social media out there, and by interacting with social media apps on one’s phone, they work together to give an individual availability and purchasing power at any given time of the day. The phone is one device allows people to seamlessly move from the physical to the online world.Today the Internet can be visualised as a small, lightweight square that fits easily into a consumer’s pocket or purse, with Facebook and Twitter already built into its apps menu.
  • Tweet – half way through Social Media seminar – amazing audience #bhhpabelfast ... Add pictureWeb savvyThey have a phone in their pocket – so they are connected to the Internet and Social Media whenever they want Connected with online Social networks or know where to look for informationLike sharing contentEmpowered to have their own opinionsRely on third party opinions rather than trust the information from a brandNo matter what you do, people are talking about you These people are all around you right now and are your customers
  • Social media has created a shift in how people discover, read and share news, information and content . Everybody now has an opinion and a view – and these Social Networking tools – have made it even easier to do so Social media is instantaneous67% of Internet users are engaged in some way with social media
  • Local Hospice – Weldmar Hospicecare using twitter to reinforce its brand and position itself as a caring organisation
  • Eighty percent of Americans expect that emergency responders will monitor social networks, and a third assume that posting or Tweeting a request for help during a disaster will get them help within an hour, according to a 2011 Red Cross opinion pollRed Cross launched their Digital Operations Center to help monitor and respond to 70,000 crises per year — everything from house fires to hurricanes. Red Cross staff and digital volunteers can now listen in to online conversations, interacting directly with people who need help or have questions.
  • Innovative ways of working in social media, which is now accepted as part of “normal business”. In 2009 carried out UK’s first online mapping of a local community to identify who the key online influencers were, what they were saying and in which spaces and with whom they shared their conversations. The fundamental purpose was to connect the council with its community. Improve customer service by enabling people to access the council services in a way they want Break down old barriers – enabling customers to talk to the council openly and honestly Reduce the need for phone and face-to-face visits thereby making life easier for the customer and saving the council money Improve community and neighbourhood involvement
  • Chief Constable Peter Fahy wanted to explain to the public about the role of policing. Specifically, he wanted to “raise awareness of the diverse and complex role of policing, explaining how much time officers spend with non-crime matters”. He hoped to achieve it by releasing details of emergency and non-emergency calls over a 24-hour period. Twitter GMP had already identified Twitter as the force’s main social networking channel. A media strategy was prepared by the Press Office and the media briefed on Wednesday 13 October 2010. All media coverage was embargoed until 5am Thursday 14 October. Four new Twitter accounts were established to publish the updates supported by the main account, @gmpolice. Blogging tool CoverIt Live was used to publish the Twitter feeds to the GMP website homepage and the Intranet homepage. This was to ensure that people who did not have access to Twitter could still follow the day’s events. Results 3,200 incidents were tweeted on the dedicated accounts over 24 hours, and these were backed up with further tweets from the main @gmpolice account. These were published to a combined audience of 78,742 followers across all five Twitter accounts and the GMP website. The number of followers to @gmpolice increased from 3,000 at the start of the day to 16,000 by the end of the 24 hours. Activity on Twitter also had an impact on the number of people accessing GMP domains elsewhere on the web: • The force website received 62,630 visits during the day, which is half of what it normally receives across a whole month. • The GMP Flickr account received 12,000 hits, its highest ever in a single day, the average per day for the account was 800. Its previous record was 1,800 during February’s snowfall. A number of high profile politicians and celebrities became followers of GMP during the day.
  • Chief Constable Peter Fahy wanted to explain to the public about the role of policing. Specifically, he wanted to “raise awareness of the diverse and complex role of policing, explaining how much time officers spend with non-crime matters”. He hoped to achieve it by releasing details of emergency and non-emergency calls over a 24-hour period. Twitter GMP had already identified Twitter as the force’s main social networking channel. A media strategy was prepared by the Press Office and the media briefed on Wednesday 13 October 2010. All media coverage was embargoed until 5am Thursday 14 October. Four new Twitter accounts were established to publish the updates supported by the main account, @gmpolice. Blogging tool CoverIt Live was used to publish the Twitter feeds to the GMP website homepage and the Intranet homepage. This was to ensure that people who did not have access to Twitter could still follow the day’s events. Results 3,200 incidents were tweeted on the dedicated accounts over 24 hours, and these were backed up with further tweets from the main @gmpolice account. These were published to a combined audience of 78,742 followers across all five Twitter accounts and the GMP website. The number of followers to @gmpolice increased from 3,000 at the start of the day to 16,000 by the end of the 24 hours. Activity on Twitter also had an impact on the number of people accessing GMP domains elsewhere on the web: • The force website received 62,630 visits during the day, which is half of what it normally receives across a whole month. • The GMP Flickr account received 12,000 hits, its highest ever in a single day, the average per day for the account was 800. Its previous record was 1,800 during February’s snowfall. A number of high profile politicians and celebrities became followers of GMP during the day.
  • November 2011 London Fire Service held a live "Twitterthon" throughout one Saturday to alert people to the number of bonfire-related incidents across the capital.It used its main Twitter account (@LondonFire) to tweet about every fire its crews were called out to between 4pm and midnight on 5th November. Bonfire Night 2011 saw the fewest number of fires across the capital since records began, according to initial figures from the London Fire Brigade. Preliminary figures show that the number of fires fell this year despite expectations that Bonfire Night would be busier than usual due to it falling on a Saturday. The capital’s fire crews were called to deal with around 130 fires, almost a third fewer than in 2010, when they dealt with 175 blazes. The Brigade says that this is, in part, due to its effective communication of fire safety messages to the public in the run up to Bonfire Night and on the night itself. A total of 128 tweets were sent. Tweets were sent about a range of incidents, including a huge number of out of control bonfires and several blazes caused by stray fireworks, including one in Peckham where a firework caused a serious blaze on the balcony of a flat. The Brigade received an overwhelming level of public support via Twitter on the night and several of the Brigade’s tweets were retweeted by hundreds of people. As a result of the twitterthon, the Brigade increased its Twitter followers more than 25 per cent to over 14,500. London Fire Commissioner, Ron Dobson, said: “I’m pleased to be able to say that this year’s Bonfire Night passed off without major incident. There were far fewer fires on November 5th and our Bonfire Night twitterthon and the publicity that surrounded it played a big part in this.”
  • November 2011 London Fire Service held a live "Twitterthon" throughout one Saturday to alert people to the number of bonfire-related incidents across the capital.It used its main Twitter account (@LondonFire) to tweet about every fire its crews were called out to between 4pm and midnight on 5th November. Bonfire Night 2011 saw the fewest number of fires across the capital since records began, according to initial figures from the London Fire Brigade. Preliminary figures show that the number of fires fell this year despite expectations that Bonfire Night would be busier than usual due to it falling on a Saturday. The capital’s fire crews were called to deal with around 130 fires, almost a third fewer than in 2010, when they dealt with 175 blazes. The Brigade says that this is, in part, due to its effective communication of fire safety messages to the public in the run up to Bonfire Night and on the night itself. A total of 128 tweets were sent. Tweets were sent about a range of incidents, including a huge number of out of control bonfires and several blazes caused by stray fireworks, including one in Peckham where a firework caused a serious blaze on the balcony of a flat. The Brigade received an overwhelming level of public support via Twitter on the night and several of the Brigade’s tweets were retweeted by hundreds of people. As a result of the twitterthon, the Brigade increased its Twitter followers more than 25 per cent to over 14,500. London Fire Commissioner, Ron Dobson, said: “I’m pleased to be able to say that this year’s Bonfire Night passed off without major incident. There were far fewer fires on November 5th and our Bonfire Night twitterthon and the publicity that surrounded it played a big part in this.”
  • Here are some ways you could use Social Media
  • Social Media needs to be part of your whole marketing plan / Find out where your customers are first / Come up with measurable goalsDo one thing at a time / It is a commitment, / ….. not a campaign
  • To find people To rank influencersTo find conversations, themesTo plan when to act and what to say
  • How other public sector and emergency services could use social media to further their corporate aimsTake the awful helicopter crash in the Vauxhall area of London in January. There were eyewitness accounts, video footage, and photos (taken by people on their commute to work) all over social media. This information could prove vital in the post-incident investigation, and a well-publicised Twitter address with an associated hashtag -- perhaps @999 or #londonheli in this instance -- would provide a fast (possibly real-time) and efficient way for the public to share information with the emergency services.
  • To find people To rank influencersTo find conversations, themesTo plan when to act and what to say
  • Highlights the networks that existThicker lines denote more conversations and bigger influencers because of their follower size
  • 1. Meet friends. Now Facebook is not just for school kids. Members are typically older and more mature than on other sites, and there are more professional users.2. Get business contacts. With more than 200 million users, not only are your friends on Facebook, so are your prospects, your customers, your JV partners… and, of course, your competitors. So don’t miss out.3. Instant gate opener. Facebook members are open to connecting. You can easily begin a dialog with highly successful-even famous-people who were previously otherwise unreachable.4. Build relationships. By engaging in conversations with your prospects and customers, you can better adapt your marketing and business services to meet their needs.5. Increase visibility. By consistently showing up, posting relevant information, and being a thought leader, you can increase visibility and credibility as an expert in your area.6. Build your personal brand. Now, the lines between business and personal have become blurred. You can reveal as much or as little about yourself as you wish, allowing you to personalize your brand.7. Target your niche. Users volunteer vast amounts of information about themselves that you can readily access. These kinds of demographics, psychographics, and technographics would previously have cost fortunes to access.8. Get quick top Google placement. Create a Page for your business and ”push” information to your “fans.” Pages (for business) and Profiles (for personal) are indexed for optimal search engine positioning. Facebook has a page rank of #7 according to Alexa.9. Create targeted Ads. With Facebook Social Ads, you can test out extremely targeted advertising for minimal cost. For example, only targets those in Malaysia, or only target teenage females betwwen 15-20, etc.10. Free marketing. Facebook is totally free to use (except for the Ads) and with regular activity you’ll end up with more traffic, more subscribers, and more paying clients too.
  • Dorset Fire & Rescue Service - Using Social Media 2013

    1. 1. DORSET FIRE & RESCUEEFFECTIVE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIADAVID LAKINS & CHRIS REDHEADinfo@keymultimedia.co.uk@DAVIDLAKINS @MRCHRISREDHEAD
    2. 2. AGENDA• Understand the impact of social media in the modern world• Learn how other public sector and emergency services have used social media to further their corporate aims• Understand how DFRS can use existing social media channels to communicate with Dorsets at risk communities• Understand how DFRS can further its prevention, protect and response objectives using social media• Learn how the DFRS Social Media strategy affects you
    3. 3. BEFORE WE START• Is everybody au fait with the social media networks?• Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, YouTube, Google+• Are you regular users and what do you use?• How often?• What are your likes & dislikes?
    4. 4. SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE MODERN WORLD• Understand the impact of social media in the modern world
    5. 5. IN THE BEGINNING
    6. 6. INTERNET TODAY
    7. 7. we can dream up...http://green.autoblog.com/2011/03/17/elon-musk-tesla-model-s-third-party-apps/
    8. 8. Yesterday Today Go to the computer Open a browser or Appto use the Internet / web to use the Internet / web
    9. 9. SOCIAL MEDIA’S MOST IMPORTANT TOOL • Social media and mobile media are intimately connected • Text messaging and phone calls remain the most popular forms of social media • Internet and Apps on a phone give a user interaction and purchasing power at any given time of the day. • Today the Internet is as a small, lightweight square that fits easily into your pocket, with Facebook and Twitter already built into its apps menu.
    10. 10. THE FUTURE IS MOBILE •3G or WiFi means almost permanent connectivity to the web. •Users can share news, photos and video clips quickly without having to move to another device or PC •GPS Handsets enables location-based content •Geo-tagging of content – photos, tweets & posts11
    11. 11. WELCOME TO A NEW TYPE OF USER• Web savvy• They are connected• They are mobile!• Know how to find information• Like sharing content• Empowered to have their own opinions• Rely on third party opinions of their peers rather than trust the information from a brand
    12. 12. POWER IN YOUR POCKET• Everyone can be a food critic, film producer, commentator and amateur journalist – People videoing incidents e.g. M5 crash near Taunton last year, Vauxhall Helicopter crash – TV programmes using social media to engage #xfactor, #bbcqt, @bbcquestiontime – Reviews and opinions are part of daily life - TripAdvisor, Amazon
    13. 13. WHAT IS SOCIAL MEDIA• Conversations• Learning from your audience / target groups• Engagement• Building Relationships• Not just about promotion 14
    14. 14. IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA• Social Media video clip• Run
    15. 15. WHAT IS SOCIAL MEDIA? • Twitter • Facebook • LinkedIn • Google+ • Pinterest • Instagram • Youtube • What else?16
    16. 16. SOCIAL MEDIA USE
    17. 17. SOCIAL MEDIA USE
    18. 18. AGENDA• Understand the impact of social media in the modern world• Learn how other public sector and emergency services have used social media to further their corporate aims• Understand how DFRS can use existing social media channels to communicate with Dorsets at risk communities• Understand how DFRS can further its prevention, protect and response objectives using social media• Learn how the DFRS Social Media strategy affects you
    19. 19. COMMERCIAL COMPANIES• How commercial companies are using social media – Customer support – Live events – tweeting during exhibitions, conferences and concerts – Targeting individuals – listening for conversations, targeting profiles – Engaging and developing brand advocates – Building a broader picture of their customers
    20. 20. CUSTOMER SERVICE
    21. 21. OLYMPICS WEYMOUTH 2012• Social media played an enormous role during the Olympics• Locally it was used to keep people informed about what was going on• More importantly it was used to push messages out very quickly and quash rumours about visiting the events (or staying away)
    22. 22. FACEBOOK TARGETING
    23. 23. LOCALS USING TWITTER
    24. 24. CUSTOMER SUPPORT
    25. 25. CUSTOMER SUPPORT
    26. 26. BUILDING BRAND ADVOCATES• The ultimate aim for any business is to get close to its customers• Engage with people that will champion your brand and your values
    27. 27. SOCIAL MEDIA PROFILING• Integrating social media profiles with their CRMs to build a broader picture of their customers
    28. 28. PUBLIC SECTOR USE• How other public sector and emergency services have used social media to further their corporate aims
    29. 29. AMERICAN RED CROSS• 80% of Americans expect that emergency responders will monitor social networks, and a third assume that posting or Tweeting a request for help during a disaster will get them help within an hour, according to a 2011 Red Cross opinion poll• Red Cross staff and digital volunteers can now listen in to online conversations, interacting directly with people who need help or have questions.
    30. 30. AMERICAN RED CROSS “During an emergency, information is like gold. It is so valuable. “Red Cross Digital Operations Center to help monitor and respondto 70,000 crises per year — everything from house fires tohurricanes
    31. 31. BRIGHTON & HOVE CITY COUNCIL• In 2009 carried out UK’s first online mapping of a local community to identify who the key online influencers were, what they were saying and in which spaces and with whom they shared their conversations.• The fundamental purpose was to connect the council with its community. – Improve customer service – Break down old barriers – Reduce the need for phone and face-to-face visits – Improve community and neighbourhood involvement
    32. 32. GREATER MANCHESTER POLICE (GMP) 24-HOUR TWITTERTHON• “Raise awareness of the diverse and complex role of policing, explaining how much time officers spend with non-crime matters”.• Used Twitter to release details of emergency and non-emergency calls over a 24-hour period.
    33. 33. GREATER MANCHESTER POLICE (GMP) 24-HOUR TWITTERTHON• Results – 3,200 incidents were tweeted over 24 hours – Followers to @gmpolice increased from 3,000 at the start of the day to 16,000 by the end of the 24 hours. – The force website received 62,630 visits during the day, which is half of what it normally receives across a whole month. – A number of high profile politicians and celebrities became followers of GMP during the day.
    34. 34. LONDON FIRE TWITTERTHON• November 2011 London Fire Service held a live "Twitterthon" throughout one Saturday to alert people to the number of bonfire-related incidents across the capital.• @LondonFire Twitter account tweeting about every fire its crews were called out to between 4pm and midnight on 5th November.• Bonfire Night 2011 saw the fewest number of fires across the capital since records began, despite expectations that Bonfire Night falling on a Saturday.• Crews dealt with 130 fires, almost a third fewer than in 2010, when they dealt with 175 blazes.
    35. 35. LONDON FIRE TWITTERTHON• A total of 128 tweets were sent about a range of incidents, including a huge number of out of control bonfires and several blazes caused by stray fireworks• The Brigade received an overwhelming level of public support via Twitter on the night and as a result of the twitterthon, the Brigade increased its Twitter followers more than 25% to over 14,500.
    36. 36. AGENDA• Understand the impact of social media in the modern world• Learn how other public sector and emergency services have used social media to further their corporate aims• Understand how DFRS can use existing social media channels to communicate with Dorsets at risk communities• Understand how DFRS can further its prevention, protect and response objectives using social media• Learn how the DFRS Social Media strategy affects you
    37. 37. DFRS USES OF SOCIAL MEDIA?– Learn what people are saying about DFRS– Learn what people are saying about Dorset / Community concerns– Create a buzz for DFRS events & campaigns– Increase brand exposure & promote your values– Identify and recruit influencers to spread your message– Recruit new staff and advocates– Support your services– Engage with hard to reach / vulnerable groups– Link with other Support Agencies– Get your message out fast– Retain links & establish a personal relationship
    38. 38. DISADVANTAGES OF SOCIAL MEDIA?– Time consuming– Resource hungry– Negative feedback– Can lose control of your message
    39. 39. STARTING WITH A STRATEGY• Social Media needs to be part of your whole communications strategy• Be clear about your objectives• Find out where your audience are first – and engage with them on their terms and the social network they prefer• Come up with measurable goals 43
    40. 40. DFRS SOCIAL MEDIA AIMS• Using official social media channels to communicate effectively, immediately, efficiently and appropriately with certain target audiences, that might not use or be subject to other methods the service uses.
    41. 41. DFRS SOCIAL MEDIA AIMS• Through the MOSAIC tool we have identified three such groups: – G33 – Transient singles poorly supported by family and neighbours – A04 – Villagers with few well paid alternatives to agricultural employment – D13 – Higher income older champions of village communities• From their characteristics, these groups are most likely to respond to social media as they use this to communicate with friends and family. The internet is also seen as a primary point of call for information, research and keeping in touch.• The messages DFRS uses social media for could occur during an incident, as proactive prevention messages or in response to other external factors.
    42. 42. DFRS SOCIAL MEDIA OBJECTIVES• To raise the profile of DFRS by increasing our followers on Twitter to 10,000 by the end of 2014.• To raise the profile of DFRS by increasing our followers on Facebook to 3,000 by the end of 2014.• To encourage and empower DFRS employees to use social media corporately to communicate.• Through until the end of 2014, keep up to date with key ways to use social media to communicate and spread messages to a wider audience.• In line with the DFRS Community Safety Strategy, find innovative ways of engaging with our target public through social media. This may include the expansion of our social media channels.• Support our compliance with the requirements for access to information and open data
    43. 43. ESTABLISH A SOCIAL MEDIA FOUNDATION• Listen• Learn• Engage & Share• Ultimate Goal: Position DFRS as a key part of the local community 47
    44. 44. LISTEN• Absorb what is happening in the community• Listen to the chatter about DFRS• What concerns are being raised by the local community?• Monitor incidents
    45. 45. LISTEN• Just by listening ........ – Monitor conversations – Gather insight and intelligence during and after an event – Track location based information
    46. 46. LISTEN• Follow Twitter streams, searches and lists• Following hashtags• Tracking Geo-tagged conversations and photos
    47. 47. 51
    48. 48. INCIDENT EXAMPLE #1• Helicopter crash in Vauxhall, London – Police, Fire and other services could monitor the social media networks to gather information / photos without having to ask for it• Access to real-time information• Also gather intelligence after the event took place – photos from locals on the scene – helping to build a picture of what happened
    49. 49. INCIDENT EXAMPLE #1• Eyewitness accounts, video footage, and photos (taken by people on their commute to work) all over social media.• Vital information in the post-incident investigation• A well-publicised Twitter address with an associated hashtag -- perhaps @999 or #londonhelicrash in this instance -- would provide a fast (possibly real-time) and efficient way for the public to share information with the emergency services.
    50. 50. INCIDENT EXAMPLE #1• Combine social media information with CCTV, telephone calls within an incident management system to create a complete timeline of an event.
    51. 51. INCIDENT EXAMPLE #2• Help requestdid you witness motorbike crash on A35 A35 Help request – – did you witness crash on Thursday evening? use #dorsetfire and let us know Thursday evening? use #dorsetfire Help request – farm equipment stolen near Bere Regis – please be on the lookout – pics here bit/ly/Uw6NNmy Incident update – hair straightners were the cause of this fire – pics here bit/ly/k0PP6Nrt
    52. 52. USE OF HASHTAGS• #falsealarmfriday• #Dagenham• #testittuesday• #flooding• #floods• #uksnow DT1#falsealarmfriday
    53. 53. USE OF HASHTAGS• Opportunities to share #hashtags across agencies / support networks & the press• WDDC Olympic campaign – different #hashtags, #sailing2012, #olympicsailing, #weymouth2 012 – message was diluted• Agreement across agencies / Press to share #hashtags – use the same #hashtag where possible
    54. 54. SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING• Twitter Monitoring – Tweetdeck – Commercial monitoring tools • Ubervu • Radian 6
    55. 55. TWEETDECK
    56. 56. SOCIAL MEDIA MONITORING TOOLS• Real time• Historical – up to 3 months data• Track all Social Media resources in one place – Twitter & Facebook – Blogs – Discussion Forums – YouTube – News – Manage monitoring, tag conversations for retrieval, send notifications to departments62
    57. 57. 63
    58. 58. 64
    59. 59. LEARN• Finding people• Ranking influencers• Finding conversations, themes• Planning when to act and what to say
    60. 60. IDENTIFYING INFLUENCERS• Identifying Connections - http://mentionmapp.com • Explore connections via Twitter usernames • Identify influencers66
    61. 61. MENYTIONMAPP67
    62. 62. ANALYSING DORSET TWITTERSPHERE• Opportunity to analyse Dorset Twittersphere as well as DFRS followers• Categorise people• Understand who are your most influential and far-reach followers• Target them with DM in advance of activities
    63. 63. ENGAGING WITH INFLUENCERS• Identifying and then engaging – using @message• For example:- – We had a report on mental health recently, which is not an area we do lots and lots of stuff in and we wanted to get as much reach as possible. So we engaged with lots of mental health organisations and we said we want to go really hard on this day, this is what we want tweeted and we hit the bloggers, and we just made a nice buzz and noise on that day, much greater than if we’d just gone through the usual e-mail traffic.” @dorsetcommunityaction
    64. 64. CONVERSATION THEMES• What to tweet / facebook ?• Identify themes that resonate with your audience – Follow the Press – Major incidents – Weather / Roads – Topical TV moments – Fire on Eastenders• You may be creating the news!
    65. 65. CONVERSATION THEMES• Powerful messages• Provocative• Thought provoking
    66. 66. TWITTER TIMINGS• It’s important to understand the timings of tweets and posts• It will depend on your target audience - when people are at home or at work
    67. 67. WHEN TO POST? Finding the best times to tweetDorset Fire Service 73
    68. 68. TWITTER TIMINGS Finding the best times to tweetLondon Fire Service 74
    69. 69. TWITTER TIMINGS Finding the best times to tweetCheshire Fire Service 75
    70. 70. ENGAGE• Encourage Conversations and share• Twitter• Facebook• Google+• YouTube• Pinterest• Instagram76
    71. 71. ENGAGEMENT
    72. 72. IDEA – FACEBOOK BADGE
    73. 73. TARGETED FACEBOOK ADS• Create targeted Ads for recruitment & campaigns• Build relationships with your audience• Increase visibility of DFRS• Build your brand79
    74. 74. DORSET FIRE & RESCUEEFFECTIVE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIADAVID LAKINS & CHRIS REDHEADinfo@keymultimedia.co.uk@DAVIDLAKINS @MRCHRISREDHEAD

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