Music Genres

2,116 views

Published on

This is about four basic genres of music.

Published in: Entertainment & Humor
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,116
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
65
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Music Genres

  1. 2. Country Music <ul><li>Country music (or Country and Western ) is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains . It has roots in traditional folk music , Celtic music , gospel music , and old-time music and evolved rapidly in the 1920s. [1] The term country music began to be used in the 1940s when the earlier term hillbilly music was deemed to be degrading, and the term was widely embraced in the 1970s, while country and Western has declined in use since that time, except in the United Kingdom and Ireland , where it is still commonly used in the United States. [1] </li></ul>
  2. 3. Rock Music <ul><li>Rock music — or simply rock — is a loosely defined genre of popular music that developed during and after the 1960s. It has its roots in 1940s and 1950s rock and roll and rockabilly , which themselves evolved from rhythm and blues , country music and other influences. In addition, rock music drew on a number of other musical influences, including folk music , jazz , and classical music . </li></ul>
  3. 4. Jazz <ul><li>Jazz is a primarily American musical art form which originated at the beginning of the 20th century in African American communities in the Southern United States from a confluence of African and European music traditions. The style's West African pedigree is evident in its use of blue notes , improvisation , polyrhythms , syncopation , and the swung note . [ 1] </li></ul>
  4. 5. Classical <ul><li>Classical music is a broad term that usually refers to mainstream music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of Western liturgical and secular music , encompassing a broad period from roughly the 9th century to present times. [1] The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common practice period . </li></ul>
  5. 6. The End

×