Questinsitu - Signal Orchestration System React-conference-2012

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ICT-based orchestration of structured learning activity flows as a way to foster students' autonomy: a contradiction?
In this talk, I will discussed two technologies developed as part of the Learn3/EEE Spanish projects: QuesTInSitu and The Signal Orchestration System. Both technologies orchestrate students' actions along a set of learning activities. The activities are structured according to a design previously defined by the teacher, however the experimental results show that teachers' and students' perception when conducting the activities is of increased autonomous behaviour.
Proyecto EEE (TIN2011-28308-C03-03)
http://es.reactproject.eu/conference_es/conferencias-y-presentaciones/
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Synopsis: La orquestación mediada por tecnología de flujos de aprendizaje estructurados puede fomentar la autonomía de los estudiantes: una contradicción?
En esta presentación, discutiré dos tecnologías desarrolladas como parte de los proyectos españoles Learn3 y EEE: QuesTInSitu y el Sistema para la Orquestación mediante Señales (SOS, SignalOrchestration System). Ambas tecnologías permiten orquestar acciones de estudiantes en un conjunto de actividades de aprendizaje.

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  • Project: EEE Project (TIN2011-28308-C03-03) Synopsis: ICT-based orchestration of structured learning activity flows as a way to foster students' autonomy: a contradiction? In this talk, I will discussed two technologies developed as part of the Learn3/EEE Spanish projects: QuesTInSitu and The Signal Orchestration System. Both technologies orchestrate students' actions along a set of learning activities. The activities are structured according to a design previously defined by the teacher, however the experimental results show that teachers' and students' perception when conducting the activities is of increased autonomous behaviour. Synopsis: La orquestación mediada por tecnología de flujos de aprendizaje estructurados puede fomentar la autonomía de los estudiantes: una contradicción? En esta presentación, trataré dos tecnologías desarrolladas como parte de los proyectos españoles Learn3 y EEE:QuesTInSitu y el Sistema para la Orquestación mediante Señales (SOS, SignalOrchestration System). Ambas tecnologías permiten orquestar acciones de estudiantes en un conjunto de actividades de aprendizaje. Estas actividades están estructuradas según un diseño previamente definido por el profesor. Sin embargo, los resultados experimentales muestran que tanto profesores como alumnos perciben una mayor autonomía en actividades apoyadas por QuesTInSitu y SOS si lo comparan con experiencias similares previas.
  • In this talk, I will discussed two technologies developed as part of the Learn3/EEE Spanish projects: QuesTInSitu and The Signal Orchestration System. Both technologies orchestrate students' actions along a set of learning activities. The activities are structured according to a design previously defined by the teacher, however the experimental results show that teachers' and students' perception when conducting the activities is of increased autonomous behaviour.
  • Decir que no es la audiencia pero se aprovecha
  • In this talk, I will discussed two technologies developed as part of the Learn3/EEE Spanish projects: QuesTInSitu and The Signal Orchestration System. Both technologies orchestrate students' actions along a set of learning activities. The activities are structured according to a design previously defined by the teacher, however the experimental results show that teachers' and students' perception when conducting the activities is of increased autonomous behaviour.
  • In this talk, I will discussed two technologies developed as part of the Learn3/EEE Spanish projects: QuesTInSitu and The Signal Orchestration System. Both technologies orchestrate students' actions along a set of learning activities. The activities are structured according to a design previously defined by the teacher, however the experimental results show that teachers' and students' perception when conducting the activities is of increased autonomous behaviour.
  • RF12B, up to 100 m. JeeNodes, low-cost Arduino clone board ATmega329 microcontroller (logic) As illustrated in Fig. 2, the PS-device visualization module displays several color combinations associated to signals that teachers would like to send students for indicating orchestration aspects of the collaborative learning flow, such as resources distribution or group formation. It consists of 4 leds (red, green, blue and yellow), which can be turned on and off individually or in pairs trough a communication module. This module includes a transceiver RF12B that allows the PS-device to be remotely controlled by a central computer from up to 100 meters away. The hardware used in the development of the PS-devices is based on JeeNodes, a low-cost Arduino clone board [20]. The board is powered by 3 AA batteries and includes an ATmega328 microcontroller which supports embedding programmed logic. The system includes a master node that relays commands between the computer with the OS-manager and each PS-device. The communication is unidirectional  in order to avoid message sequencing and bottlenecks. Moreover, the data sent is coded into only 1 byte in order to optimize communication speed data transfer rate.
  • Three different low-cost designs have been implemented and used in several Jigsaw collaborative learning dynamics (Fig. 1). The use of the first two designs (a, b) was evaluated in two experiments framed in real scenarios [4]. The necklace was more visible, but its size and weight made it more uncomfortable. The fabric belt was lighter, thinner and aesthetically nicer, but it was less visible (too comfortable and similar to their clothes). Considering these observations, we propose an arm bracelet as an intermediate approach (Fig. 1, c). It has been designed so that it is more compact (adapted to the size of its hardware components) and can be fixed to a bracelet worn in the arm. Its position in the arm facilitates the visibility of the signals even when the participants are sitting down at their desks. Fig. 1 (c) shows how students wearing the bracelets look for other students with the same color signals to form a group. We are currently analyzing the data collected in an experiment that compares the use of the SOS arm bracelets with a controlled group using a traditional approach based on paper cards. Preliminary results indicate that the awareness facilitated by the SOS leads to a more agile classroom orchestration promoting a more satisfactory learning experience.
  • Among the three different physical designs of the signaling wearable devices, the Textile version was more popularly preferred. However, each of the designs presented potentials and limitations when compared with the others, and this is probably why some students still preferred the Belt or the Necklace devices.
  • Questinsitu - Signal Orchestration System React-conference-2012

    1. 1. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Davinia Hernández-Leo, et al. @daviniahl // davinia.hernandez@upf.edu EEE Project (TIN2011-28308-C03-03) Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona Interactive Technologies Group – Educational Technologies
    2. 2. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Signal Orchestration System Structured Flow Perception of activity flows enactment increased designed by mediated by autonomous teachers technologies behaviour
    3. 3. GTI http://gti.upf.eduQuesTInSitu: learning/assessment in situ• QuesTInSitu Web & Mobile app - support “Assessment in situ” activities where the questions of a test have to be answered in front of a related real location (in situ)• Teachers can create geo-located QTI questions and tests (routes), and students answer the tests using a mobile device with GPS and 3G Santos, P., Pérez-Sanagustín, M., Hernández-Leo, D. & Blat, J. (2011). QuesTInSitu: From tests to routes for assessment in situ activities. Computers & Education, 57 (4), 2517-2534.
    4. 4. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Discovering Barcelona! • 34 students, in groups, visited 6 districts of Barcelona to reflect about socio-economic aspects and town-planning while observing the districts (vs. visiting 1 district!) • 6 different routes • Teacher monitoring the activity in real time • Automatic feedback enhances reflection in situ
    5. 5. GTI http://gti.upf.eduExploring the History, Art and Architecture of Girona • 53 High School students explored the city observing and interacting with the architecture and the street furniture with to practice local history and art • The teacher created a route of 70 geolocated questions, and monitored the activity in real time using an IPAD • + twitter for communication!http://www.tv3.cat/videos/4015110/Telenoticies-Girona-23032012 (at 2′ 30”)http://www.tv3.cat/videos/4015290/Telenoticies-Barcelona-23032012 (at 16′ 55”)
    6. 6. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Assessing Botany in situ The professor created a route where 50 university students had to answer questions in situ observing the Barcelona botany garden, and finding, touching and measuring specific plants.
    7. 7. GTI http://gti.upf.edu A literature adventure in situA group of 20 senior learners(~70 years old), members of aliterature group, created tworoutes with the aim of proposingquestions about of anovel set in a district ofBarcelona. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w29vfCZOJ0&feature=youtu.be
    8. 8. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Signal Orchestration System Structured Flow Perception of activity flows enactment increased designed by mediated by autonomous teachers technologies behaviour
    9. 9. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Dynamic collaborative activities in the classroom• Orchestration “overhead”: • Indicate group formation and role assignment for every activity, distribution of resources/tools, collaboration areas, … considering the evolution of the learning situation/constraints • Time-consuming, noise / disorganization, attention, doesn’t scale Signal Orchestration System Augmenting physical educational spaces with “orchestration awareness mechanisms” can facilitate the orchestration of collaborative dynamics
    10. 10. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Signal Orchestration System Prototypes• Visual and auditory signals (color, blinking, sound,…)• From manager to wearable devices Signals collectively perceived• Examples: • Colors: group formation, work areas • Blinking: role distribution • Sound: change of activity • (Depends on teachers’ creativity and needs) Hernández-Leo, D., et al. (in press). SOS: Orchestrating Collaborative Activities Across Digital and Physical Spaces Using Wearable Signaling Devices. Journal of Universal Computer Science. 10
    11. 11. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Wearable devices: designs / experiments - Necklace:  + visible,  considerable size / weight, uncomfortable - Fabric:  Lighter and thinner, aesthetically nicer;  - visible: since + comfortable  risk of forgetting to check, too similar to clothes of classmates
    12. 12. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Wearable devices: designs / experiments • Intermediate approach: arm bracelet • Compact, more robust… • Awareness: also when sitting down
    13. 13. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Results from experiments… - Enables a flexible orchestration (changes on the fly, reconfiguration of signals, scalability) - High dynamism experienced by students - Hypothesis that the system facilitates students and teachers focus more their attention to the task (and less to the orchestration aspects) - Orchestration load for teachers decreases - Arm bracelets vs. control group: -time + group awareness, enjoyment, performance 13 13
    14. 14. GTI http://gti.upf.edu METIS Meeting teachers co-desing needsEnvironments by means of Integrated Learning EC EACEA Lifelong Learning Programme KA3 ICT Multilateral Projects ... coming soon (November 2012)
    15. 15. GTI http://gti.upf.edu Davinia Hernández-Leo, et al. EEE Project @daviniahl // davinia.hernandez@upf.edu (TIN2011-28308-C03-03) a

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