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James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10
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James Madison "Publius" Federalist No. 10

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Powerpoint done for my History 1 class

Powerpoint done for my History 1 class

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  • 1. Federalist No. 10 1787 Jonathan Davila History of the United States 1
  • 2. Article BackgroundPart of a series of articles aimed to ratify the United States Constitution Author 2 “Publius” – James Madison
  • 3. Who Were the Federalists?The Federalists were best exemplified as white, elite, powerful men who favored the ratification of the New Constitution – which ideals centered around for a strong, central government.Some of the most notablemembers of the FederalistsParty were comprised ofpeople such as: AlexanderHamilton, John Jay, andJames Madison. 3
  • 4. The Author’s Thesis "Among the numerous advantages promised by a well constructed Union, none deserve to be more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of faction.” –Zinn, Arnove, 2009. “Publius (James Madison), Federalist No. 10 (November 23, 1787). Voices of a People’s History of the United States, page 107 4
  • 5. Thesis Breakdown• “Well constructed union” – A strong central government• Faction (factionalism) – “a group of people connected by a shared belief or opinion within a larger group.” – Wikipedia In Our Words: Out of the many important issues that will be handled under a strong central government, the abolishment of the effects of a faction is the most important through a system of a representative democracy. 5
  • 6. Article’s Arguments James Madison’s main objectives for the Federalist No. 10 article were to convince large economic groups that the safety and strength of the new nation would lie in the adoption of the new system. He did this by using three major arguments: 6
  • 7. 1.Using populist language to show thecontrol of the people as a majority andthe effects a central government have over an outnumbered elite “I f a fa c t i o n c o n s i s t s o f le s s t h a n a m a jo r i t y , r e li e f i s s u p p li e d b y t h e r e p u b li c a n p r i n c i p le , w h i c h e n a b le s t h e m a jo r i t y t o d e fe a t i t s s i n i s t e r v i e w s b y r e g u la r v o t e . I t m a y c lo g t h e 7 a d m i n i s tra ti o n , i t m a y
  • 8. 2. Showing the majority that, together, they are not the minorityIn his articles, James Madisonstretches to the public that as “themajority, having such coexistentpassion or interest, must berendered, by their number andlocal situation, unable to concertand carry into effect schemes of 8
  • 9. 3. Controlling the Effects of Factionalism“The apportionment of taxes on the various descriptionsof property is an act which seems to require the mostexact impartiality; yet there is, perhaps, no legislative actin which greater opportunity and temptation are given to apredominant party to trample on the rules of justice.”(Publius)Madison shows that the elite uses their power to taxwhomever they please because there is no act against it.However, with a central government in place, the majorityof the people will have a voice in the matter with agovernment in the form of a representative democracy. 9
  • 10. Class Connection 10
  • 11. Class Stratification – Prior to the Revolution, the Dual System of Oppression- where the higher powers taxed the lower powers in this “class- stratification”. – Madisons idea for a representative government also resonates around the theme of a “class-strata”, where different classes are needed in a nation to exhibit different ideals/opinions. – Madison mentions that the ‘property’ was the most evident form of creating class 11 stratification.
  • 12. Equality• Madison urged for a large diverse government so a vast majority can state their own opinions.• By having an elected representative voice their opinions on behalf of their respective groups), it eliminated any acts of bribery and rich elites to pay their way into the political infrastructure and voice their own opinions. (i.e. property). 12
  • 13. Connection Points RELEVANCE TO CLASS STATEMENT DISCUSSION: CONCUR OR CONTRADICT? THE ELITE OPPRESSED THE LOWER CLASS AS AN ELITE, MADISON SUPPORTED THE AND THE DUAL SYSTEM OF OPPRESSION. LOWER CLASS. CONTRADICTION MADISON WANTS LIBERTY, BUT IS THOUGH THE COLONISTS FOUGHT FORSTRONGLY AGAINST FACTION: “LIBERTY IS LIBERTY IN THE REVOLUTUIONARY WAY,TO FACTION WHAT AIR IS TO FIRE.”BUT AIR FACTION STILL REMAINED.IS “ESSENTIAL TO ANIMAL LIFE”. (PUBLIUS) CONCUR SUCH CLASSES/IDEAS HELPED FORM THE MADISON STATES THAT DIFFERENT NATION AFTER THE WAR AND IS STILL SEENCLASSES AND OPINIONS ARE A NECESSITY IN TODAY’S SOCIETY (I.E. UNEMPLOYMENT TO A NATION. & WEALTH) CONCUR 13

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