• Save
Why diversity is wrong: an exploration of genocide in world studies
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Why diversity is wrong: an exploration of genocide in world studies

on

  • 1,687 views

Genocide, diversity, intolerance, tolerance, respect, holocaust, kipling, marx, edmund burke, punic wars, carthage, great revolt, anti-semitism, colonization, armenian genocide, rwandan genocide, ...

Genocide, diversity, intolerance, tolerance, respect, holocaust, kipling, marx, edmund burke, punic wars, carthage, great revolt, anti-semitism, colonization, armenian genocide, rwandan genocide, cambodian genocide, darfur, bosnian genocide

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,687
Views on SlideShare
1,687
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Why diversity is wrong: an exploration of genocide in world studies Why diversity is wrong: an exploration of genocide in world studies Presentation Transcript

  • Why Diversity is Wrong: An Exploration of Genocide StudiesKristen Larsen, Sanderson High School klarsen@wcpss.netRandy Moncelle, Apex High School hmoncelle@wpcss.netDave Phillips, Wakefield High School dphillips1@wcpss.netChris Story, Sanderson High School cstory@wcpss.net Wake County Public School System
  • Holocaust and Genocide in World Studies• WCPSS elective adopted by teacher-initiative; first taught in 2009-2010• Our purpose: share intellectual, emotional, and practical knowledge about teaching genocide.• History is not our focus. This course is about present-day political, social, and economic conditions.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Intellectual Rewards“Nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer; nothing is moredifficult than to understand him.” - Fyodor Dostoevsky, Russian writer (1821 - 1881)
  • Why teach genocide studies? Personal Rewards • A greater appreciation for the good things in life - liberty, prosperity, and security • A greater respect for the dignity of all people • Authentic peer collaboration and personal academic growth • Students tell you that the course “made me a betterVolunteer person.” State Community College. "The Four Freedoms." Norman Rockwell: The Four Freedoms. Volunteer State Community College, 21Feb. 2012. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Never Again?The cliché: “Those who do not remember the past arecondemned to repeat it.” - George Santayana, American philosopher (1863-1952)As educators we must not only teach students toremember acts of genocide but empower themwith tools to recognize and counter ideas andbehaviors that lead to genocidal outcomes.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Everyone has a role to play. • Perpetrator • Victim • Bystander • Intervener“All the worlds a stage …” - William Shakespeare, English writer (1564-1616)
  • Why teach genocide studies? Polarizing rhetoric in American societyProminent journalistsassociations havedenounced the use ofthe term "illegals" bythe newsmedia, noting thatthe term"criminaliz[es] theperson, not the J.K.F. "Why Does Fox News Choose to Use the Loaded Term "Illegals?"." Mediaaction." It is a Matters For America. Media Matters For America, 05 Feb. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012."trigger word."
  • Why teach genocide studies?Polarizing rhetoric in American societyMitt Romney accusesNewt Gingrich ofcalling Spanish a"ghetto language." The Associated Press. "Fact Check: Debate over ghetto Language Ad." NBC Politics. MSNBC, 27 Jan. 2012. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Polarizing rhetoric in American society Banks, Adelle M. "Florida Pastor Oversees Quran Burning." USA Today Religion. USA Today, 21 Mar. 2011. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.“Where they burn books, they will, in the end, burn humanbeings too.” - Heinrich Heine, German writer, Almansor, 1821
  • Why teach genocide studies?Polarizing rhetoric in American society Adler, Margot. "Islamic Center Near Ground Zero Sparks Anger." NPR News. NPR, 15 July 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Political extremism in EuropeThe world’s biggest democratic region is now thebreeding ground for extreme-right politics. MacShane, Denis. "Europe: the Rise of the Extreme Right." The Daily Beast. Newsweek, 24 Mar. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Political extremism in Europe2010 elections: 22.9% Progress PartyThere are alsosignificant parties 15.5 %of the extreme Dutch Freedom Partyright in Belgium, 11.9% 16.7% National 28.9% JobbikLatvia, Slovakia, Front Swiss People’s Partyand Slovenia. 8.3% Northern League MacShane, Denis. "Europe: the Rise of the Extreme Right." The Daily Beast. Newsweek, 24 Mar. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Why teach genocide studies? Political extremism in Europe Mr Wilders, whose statements have included comparing the Koran with Hitlers Mein Kampf, told the court freedom of expression was on trial. "Ive had enough of the Koran in the Netherlands: Forbid that fascist book." BBC. "Dutch Anti-Islam MP Geert Wilders Goes on Trial." BBC News Europe. BBC, 4 Mar. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.“Often an entire city has suffered because of an evil man.” - Hesiod, Greek poet, Works and Days (~800 BC)
  • Why teach genocide studies? Roma expulsion in EuropeFrance and Italy are among[European Union] memberstates breaking up Romacamps and deporting EUcitizens. Phillips, Leigh, and Angelique Chrisofis. "Roma Campaigners Dismiss Brussels Claim on Evictions and Expulsions."The Guardian World News. The Guardian, 25 Aug. 2011. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.“The evil of the world is made possible by nothing but thesanction you give it.” - Ayn Rand, American writer, Atlas Shrugged (1905 - 1982)
  • Why teach genocide studies? Genocide in DR Congo Gettlemen, Jeffrey. "Mass Rapes in Congo Reveal U.N. Weakness." New York Times Africa. New York Times, 3 Mar. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012. BBC. "DR Congo Killings May Be Genocide-UN Draft Report." BBC News Africa. BBC, 27 Aug. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.“A person may cause evil to others not only by his action but byhis inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to themfor the injury.” - John Stuart Mill, British philosopher (1806 - 1873)
  • Why teach genocide studies? Genocide in DarfurThe genocide in Darfur hasclaimed 400,000 lives anddisplaced over 2,500,000people. More than onehundred people continue todie each day; five thousand United Human Rights Council. "Genocide in Darfur." Uniteddie every month. Human Rights Council Reports. United Human Rights Council, 21 Feb. 2012. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men donothing.” - Edmund Burke, Anglo-Irish statesman (1729-1797)
  • Why teach genocide studies? Other Examples of Intolerance?“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men donothing.” - Edmund Burke, Anglo-Irish statesman (1729-1797)
  • Evolution of the CourseInitial essential question: What is genocide andwhy does it occur?• What have been the causes and course of several famous genocides, most notably the Holocaust?• What circumstances lead to radical polarization within societies?• How do socio-economic conditions affect a society’s core values and political functions?• What are the personal experiences of those involved in genocides from the perspective of perpetrators, victims, bystanders, and interveners?
  • Pre-20th century topicscovered in genocide studies• Rome: Punic Wars and the Great Judean Revolt• Medieval religious fanaticism and anti-Semitism• Spanish conquest of the Caribbean and the Americas• English colonization of Ireland, North America, and Australia• The Jacobin phase of the French Revolution• American Indian Removal• New Imperialism, Social Darwinism, eugenics, and racial anti-Semitism
  • Early 20th century topicscovered in genocide studies• Belgian colonization of Congo• US colonization of the Philippines• German colonization of Southwest Africa• The Armenian genocide• Post-World War I European political landscape• The rise of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany• The Soviet Holodomor• The Holocaust• Imperial Japanese war crimes
  • Late 20th/early c. topics 21 stcovered in genocide studies• Maoist China• The Cambodian genocide• The Mayan genocide in Guatemala• The dissolution of Yugoslavia, the Bosnian Genocide, and the Kosovo conflict• The Rwandan genocide• North Korean famine• The Sudanese Civil War and the Darfur Crisis• NATO intervention in Libya
  • Evolution of the CourseOur conclusion: Genocide is the worst crime humanitycan inflict upon itself. Its frequent outbreaks are like adisease. Genocide studies demands a shift away frombeing impassioned, unbiased historians to beingpassionate agents of historical change. Likephysicians, we must work to cure this disease, notmerely understand its effects or treat its symptoms.The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in variousways; the point is to change it. - Karl Marx, German philosopher, Theses On Feuerbach (1818-1883)
  • Evolution of the CourseNew essential question: How can we act to preventgenocide?• What policies should the US adopt to prevent genocide?• When genocide occurs, what should be the role of the international community in regards to intervention?• How can liberty, prosperity, and security be won and maintained for all peoples?• How can democracy flourish and failures of democracy be avoided?The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in variousways; the point is to change it. - Karl Marx, German philosopher, Theses On Feuerbach (1818-1883)
  • Why is “diversity” wrong?“All People like us are WE, and everyone else is THEY.” - Rudyard Kipling, English writer (1865-1936)
  • “Us” versus “Them”“Us” versus “them” is a dangerous mentality.Decreasing the likelihood of mass politicalviolence – atrocities such as genocide and ethniccleansing – requires more than just strategies andpolicies, it requires a change in the way that weunderstand individual rights and fluid grouprelationships.Chirot, Daniel, and Clark McCauley. "A Tribal Mentality Can Lead to Genocide." Smart Library On Globalization. Center On Law And Globalization, 2012.Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Is tolerance enough?“Tolerance is respect, acceptance andappreciation of the rich diversity of our worldscultures, our forms of expression and ways ofbeing human. Tolerance is harmony indifference.”UNESCO. "Declaration of Principles on Tolerance." Unesco.org. United Nations Educational, Scientific And Cultural Organization, 16 Nov. 1995.Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Is tolerance enough? But we would find it patronizing, even downright insulting, to be “tolerated” at someones dinner table … We tolerate those we consider inferior. In religious circles, tolerance, at best, is what the pious extend toward people they regard as heathens, idol worshippers or infidels. It is time we did away with tolerance and replaced it with “mutual respect.” - Rajiv Malhotra, founder of Infinity Foundation (1950-present)Malhotra, Rajiv. "Tolerance Isnt Good Enough: the Need for Mutual Respect in Interfaith Relations." Huffington Post Religion. The HuffingtonPost, 09 Dec. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • Is tolerance enough? According to Janet Haag, editor of Princeton-based multi-faith journal Sacred Journey: “…the Latin origin of "tolerance" refers to enduring and does not convey mutual affirmation or support” and “implicitly suggests an imbalance of power in the relationship, with one of the parties in the position of giving or withholding permission for the other to be.” The Latin word for respect "presupposes we are equally worthy of honor. There is no room for arrogance and exclusivity in mutual respect."Malhotra, Rajiv. "Tolerance Isnt Good Enough: the Need for Mutual Respect in Interfaith Relations." Huffington Post Religion. The HuffingtonPost, 09 Dec. 2010. Web. 21 Feb. 2012.
  • What is mutual respect? To be colorblind orto celebrate differences? Our personal experiences: 1971 South Carolina "Jim Crow" 2001 War on Terror and cultural myopia
  • Is tolerance enough? Moving the goalpost“Because nothing motivates people like setting a goal, reachingthat goal, and being told that it’s not good enough.”
  • What is the best way to teach about the Holocaust in three days?Don’t teach about the Holocaust!Teach about genocide.
  • What is the best way to teach about the Holocaust in three days?Day 1: What is genocide? Howdo Gregory Stanton’s EightStages of Genocide apply tothe Holocaust?
  • What is the best way to teach about the Holocaust in three days?Day 2: How do Stanton’s EightStages of Genocide apply toCambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia, Darfur, and elsewhere?
  • What is the best way to teach about the Holocaust in three days?Day 3: What should be theresponse of the internationalcommunity to warning signs ofan impending genocide or tothe outbreak of genocide?
  • Teaching Tips• Maintain a scholarly detachment and a humanitarian heart.• Be empathic, not sympathetic.• Don’t compare evils.• Numbers don’t matter; a murder is a murder.• Keep open communication with parents and administration. Ask parents to look for signs of psychological distress and to keep a running dialogue with students.• Get students to share personal experiences from tourist visits.• PREVIEW ALL MATERIALS! (Especially when showing R and TV- MA features.)
  • Resources for Beginners• USHMM website Videos:• Choices curriculum from • History Channel’s Third Reich: Brown University the Rise & Fall • Shake Hands with the DevilBooks: • The Killing Fields• Genocide: A Comprehensive • “Darfur in 10 Minutes” Introduction by Adam Jones (YouTube)• Worse than War by Daniel • The Pianist Goldhagen • BBC The Nazis: A Warning• Ordinary Men by Christopher from the Past Browning • BBC Auschwitz• Holocaust by Van Pelt • Swing Kids • Defiance
  • Advanced Studies• Blood & Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur by Ben Kiernan• BBC Death of Yugoslavia• The Soviet Story• Nanking
  • Contact Information: Kristen Larsen, Sanderson High School klarsen@wcpss.net Randy Moncelle, Apex High School hmoncelle@wpcss.net Dave Phillips, Wakefield High School dphillips1@wcpss.net Chris Story, Sanderson High School cstory@wcpss.net