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Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
Progressivism
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Progressivism

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  • 1. The Progressive Era
    1890s-1920s
  • 2. 7.01: Explain the conditions that led to the rise of Progressivism.
    7.02: Analyze how different groups of Americans made economic and political gains in the Progressive Period.
    7.03: Evaluate the effects of racial segregation on different regions and segments of the Unites States' society.
    7.04: Examine the impact of technological changes on economic, social, and cultural life in the United States.
  • 3. What you will learn:
    • Who were Progressives?
    • 4. What were their goals?
    • 5. Who were some famous Progressives? What causes did they advance?
    • 6. Who benefited from progressivism? Who saw it as a threat?
  • Who were Progressives?
    Populists: farmers/workers, in South and West, lower/working class
    Progressives: middle class, educated, urban, women, old Social Gospel
    Progressivism = Populism that had “shaved its whiskers, washed its shirt, put on a derby, and moved up into the middle class.”
  • 7. Progressives were:
    Women: the “cult of domesticity” is challenged by middle class, educated women; new role for women in the public sphere.
  • 8. Progressives were Muckrakers:
    • Ida M. Tarbell, The History of the Standard Oil Company (1904)
    • 9. Upton Sinclair, The Jungle(1906)
  • What did Progressives believe?
    Government should be more active to cure social problems.
  • 10. Three Basic Goalsof the Progressives
    Restore control of gov’t to the people
    Correct the injustices of industrialization
    Restore greater economic opportunity to all Americans (spread the wealth)
  • 11. Four Basic Types of Progressive Reform:
    Social (keyword: “Democracy”)
    Economic (“Monopoly”)
    Moral (“Purity”)
    Structural/Political (“Efficiency”)
  • 12. Social Progressivism:
    • Urban problems (JacobRiis, How the OtherHalf Lives, 1890)
    • 13. Social Gospel
    • 14. Settlement House(Jane Addams, HullHouse, Chicago)
    • 15. Salvation Army(Galveston Hurricane, 1900; San FranciscoEarthquake, 1906)
  • Economic Progressivism:
    Panic of 1893: some people questioned capitalist, some “radicals” embraced Socialism (Eugene V. Debs)
    +
    Big Business: History of the Standard Oil Co. Ida Tarbell
    =
    Anti-trust movement (various legislation during T. Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilsonadmins.)
  • 16. Moral Progressivism:
    • “Americanization” of Immigrants and Kindergarten for immigrant children
    • 17. Prohibition (Women’s Christian Temperance Movement)
    • 18. Expand women’s role in public
    • 19. Women’s suffrage
  • Susan B. Anthony
  • 20.
  • 21.
  • 22. 1920: The Nineteenth Amendment
  • 23. Structural/Political Progressivism:
    Scientific Management: applying science to make the workplace more efficient; tasks become easier, workers become more productive, production increases
    Fredrick W. Taylor, Principals of Sci. Management, 1911
    Ford Motor Co.: Assembly line, 8 hr work day, $5/day 
  • 24. Structural/Political Progressivism:
    Fighting city corruption:eliminate Gilded Age political bosses, kickbacks, voting corruption (ex.: “Boss” Tweed)
    City manager/commissioner > city councils, (experts over political favors)
    Hazen Pingree(Detroit, MI) & Tom Johnson (Cleveland, OH)= Progressive mayors “gas and water socialism” (public ownership of utilities) 
  • 25. Lincoln Steffens, The Shame of the Cities (1904)
  • 26. Structural/Political Progressivism:
    Fighting State Corruption: regulate railroads, mines, mills, business
    Gov. Robert La Follette, WI: RR regulation, direct candidate primary system, limited campaign expenditures and lobbying activities, end child/’;lk labor 
  • 27.
  • 28. Structural/Political Progressivism:
    Ending Child Labor: Keating-Owen Act (1916) prohibited transportation of goods made by children across state lines; declared unconstitutional in 1920 but most states regulate child labor and dramatic national drop by 1920
    Shorter working hours:Muller v. Oregon (1908, women, 10 hr); Bunting v. Oregon (1917, men, 10 hr); worker’s comp/benefits
     
  • 29. Structural/Political Progressivism:
    Louis Brandeis (Supreme
    Court 1916-1939, “A Robin
    Hood of the Law”
    worker’s comp/benefits
     
  • 30. Structural/Political Progressivism:
    Elections
    Secret (Australian) Ballot
    Initiative/Referendum: citizens vote on laws
    Recall: fire public officials
  • 31. Goals in Summary:
    End "white slavery“
    Prohibition
    Immigration restriction
    “Americanization” of immigrants
    Anti-trust legislation
    Rate regulation of private utilities
    • Government ownership of utilities
    • 32. Women's suffrage
    • 33. End child labor
    • 34. Destruction of urban political machines
    • 35. “Taylorism”
    • 36. Political reform
  • What did you learn?
    • Who were Progressives?
    • 37. What were their goals?
    • 38. Who were some famous Progressives? What causes did they advance?
    • 39. Who benefited from progressivism? Who saw it as a threat?

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