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Modernism

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Emergence of modern thought and art from late 19th c through the 1920s.

Emergence of modern thought and art from late 19th c through the 1920s.

Published in: Education, Technology, Spiritual
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  • thanks dave for sharing this with us. is it possible to get a copy? if not I still love it
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  • I think this is a fabulous collection of images - thought provoking yet accessible. I'm teaching Yeats, so I very much enjoyed the way you threaded The Second Coming through the presetntation
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  • 1. Modernism<br />
  • 2. Themes in Early Modern Art<br />Uncertainty/insecurity.<br />Disillusionment.<br />The subconscious.<br />Overt sexuality.<br />Violence & savagery.<br />
  • 3. Beliefs about Human Nature<br />Charles Darwin <br />On the Origin of Species (1859)<br />Herbert Spencer – Social Darwinism (1860)<br />
  • 4. Frederich Nietzsche: <br />“God is dead.” <br />“I teach you the Superman.” <br />
  • 5. Sigmund Freud<br />psychic determinism<br />
  • 6. The New Physics<br />1890s: Marie Curie proved radioactivity<br />1900: Max Planck founded quantum theory<br />
  • 7. 1905: Albert Einstein postulated his Special Theory of Relativity; E = mc2 illustrates matter and energy are interchangeable.<br />1907: General Theory of Relativity explains space/time and that gravity is a property of space-time<br />
  • 8. 1927: Werner Heisenberg, Uncertainty Principle: impossible to know simultaneously both the position and momentum of any particle<br />
  • 9. 1935: Schrodinger’s Cat:<br />We place a living cat into a steel box along with a small amount of a radioactive substance and a device containing a vial of cyanide. There is a 50/50 chance that an atom of the substance will decay during the test period. It an atom does decay then a relay mechanism will trip a hammer, which will break the cyanide vial and kill the cat. <br />The observer cannot know whether or not an atom of the substance has decayed, and consequently, cannot know whether the vial has been broken, the cynadie released, and the cat killed. Since we cannot know, the cat is both dead and alive according to quantum law. Only when we open the box and learn the cat’s condition that the cat becomes one or the other (dead or alive). The observation or measurement itself affects an outcome, so that the outcome as such does not exist unless the measurement is made.<br />
  • 10. Edvard Munch: The Scream (1893)<br />Expressionism<br /><ul><li>Using bright colors to express a particular emotion.</li></li></ul><li>Franz Marc: Animal Destinies (1913)<br />
  • 11. Wassily Kandinsky: On White II (1923)<br />
  • 12. Gustav Klimt: Judith I (1901)<br />Secessionists<br /><ul><li>Disrupt the conservative values of Viennese society.
  • 13. Obsessed with the self.
  • 14. Man is a sexual being, leaning toward despair.
  • 15. Contemporary with Freud</li></li></ul><li>Gustav Klimt: <br />Wrogie sily (1901)<br />
  • 16. Gustav Klimt: The Kiss (1907-8)<br />
  • 17. Gustav Klimt: Danae (1907-8)<br />
  • 18. Henri Matisse:<br />Carmelina(1903)<br />FAUVE<br /><ul><li>The use of intense colors in a violent, and uncontrolled way.
  • 19. “Wild Beast.”</li></li></ul><li>Henri Matisse:<br />Open Window(1905)<br />
  • 20. Georges Braque: Violin & Candlestick (1910)<br />CUBISM<br /><ul><li>The subject matter is broken down, analyzed, and reassembled in abstract form.
  • 21. Cezanne  The artist should treat nature in terms of the cylinder, the sphere, and the cone.</li></li></ul><li>Georges Braque:<br />Woman with a Guitar(1913)<br />
  • 22. Georges Braque: Still Life: LeJeur (1929)<br />
  • 23. Pablo Picasso: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907)<br />
  • 24. Picasso: Studio with Plaster Head (1925)<br />
  • 25. Pablo Picasso:<br />Woman with aFlower(1932)<br />
  • 26. Paul Klee: Red & White Domes (1914)<br />
  • 27. Paul Klee: Senecio (1922)<br />
  • 28. Marcel Duchamp:<br />Nude Descending a Staircase(1912)<br />
  • 29. Marcel Duchamp: Fountain (1917)<br />
  • 30. Marc Chagall – The Birthday<br />
  • 31. Marc Chagall<br />Self-Portrait with Seven Fingers <br />
  • 32. Music<br />Claude Debussy wrote Impressionist music which virtually defines the transition from late-Romantic music to twentieth century modernist music.<br />
  • 33.
  • 34. The Rite of Spring (1913) composed by Igor Stravinsky<br />Caused a riot at its first performance in Paris<br />
  • 35. Arnold Schoenberg <br />German expressionist atonal twelve-tone music<br />Labeled by the Nazi party, alongside jazz, as degenerate art. <br />
  • 36. Wassily Kandinsky<br />
  • 37.
  • 38.
  • 39.
  • 40.
  • 41.
  • 42.
  • 43.
  • 44. “The Second Coming”, 1919<br />William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)<br />
  • 45. Turning and turning in the widening gyre <br />The falcon cannot hear the falconer; <br />Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; <br />Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, <br />The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere <br />The ceremony of innocence is drowned; <br />The best lack all conviction, while the worst <br />Are full of passionate intensity. <br />
  • 46. Surely some revelation is at hand; <br />Surely the Second Coming is at hand. <br />The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out <br />When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi <br />Troubles my sight: a waste of desert sand; <br />A shape with lion body and the head of a man, <br />A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun, <br />Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it <br />Wind shadows of the indignant desert birds. <br />The darkness drops again but now I know <br />That twenty centuries of stony sleep <br />Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle, <br />And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, <br />Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born? <br />
  • 47.
  • 48.
  • 49.
  • 50.
  • 51.
  • 52.
  • 53. Turning and turning in the widening gyre <br />The falcon cannot hear the falconer; <br />Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; <br />Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, <br />The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere <br />The ceremony of innocence is drowned; <br />The best lack all conviction, while the worst <br />Are full of passionate intensity. <br />
  • 54. Surely some revelation is at hand; <br />Surely the Second Coming is at hand. <br />The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out <br />When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi <br />Troubles my sight: a waste of desert sand; <br />A shape with lion body and the head of a man, <br />A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun, <br />Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it <br />Wind shadows of the indignant desert birds. <br />The darkness drops again but now I know <br />That twenty centuries of stony sleep <br />Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle, <br />And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, <br />Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born? <br />
  • 55.
  • 56. George Grosz<br />Grey Day(1921)<br />DaDa<br /><ul><li>Ridiculed contemporary culture & traditional art forms.
  • 57. The collapse during WW I of social and moral values.
  • 58. Nihilistic.</li></li></ul><li>George Grosz:<br />Daum Marries Her Pedantic AutomatonGeorge in May, 1920, John Heartfield is Very Glad of II(1919-1920)<br />
  • 59. George Grosz<br />The Pillarsof Society(1926)<br />
  • 60. RaoulHausmann: ABCD (1924-25)<br />
  • 61. Hannah Höch<br />Cut with the Kitchen Knife through the Last WeimarBeer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany (1920)<br />
  • 62.
  • 63.
  • 64.
  • 65. René Magritte helped pioneer Surrealism.<br />The Treachery of Images (1928-1929 )<br />
  • 66. René Magritte<br />Time Transfixed<br />1938<br />
  • 67. Salvador Dali: Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition of Civil War), 1936<br />Surrealism<br /><ul><li>Late 1920s-1940s.
  • 68. Came from the nihilistic genre of DaDa.
  • 69. Influenced by Feud’s theories on psychoanalysis and the subconscious.
  • 70. Confusing & startling images like those in dreams.</li></li></ul><li>Salvador Dali: The Persistence of Memory (1931)<br />
  • 71. Salvador Dali, Swans Reflecting Elephants, 1937<br />
  • 72. Salvador Dali: The Apparition of the Face and Fruit Dish on a Beach (1938)<br />
  • 73. Salvador Dali: Geopoliticus Child Watching the Birth of a New Man (1943)<br />
  • 74.
  • 75. Un chienandalou (1929)<br />dir. Luis Buñueland Salvador Dalí<br />
  • 76. Architecture<br />Functionalism: design based on purpose <br />Louis Henri Sullivan – father of the skyscraper <br />
  • 77. Frank Lloyd Wright<br />
  • 78. Walter Gropius and Mies van derRohe:<br />Bauhaus Building (1928)<br />Bauhaus<br /><ul><li>A utopian quality.
  • 79. Based on simplified forms and functions.
  • 80. machine economy can deliver elegantly designed items for the masses.
  • 81. Industrial techniques & materials  steel, concrete, chrome, glass.</li></li></ul><li>Walter Gropius: Lincoln, MA house (1938)<br />
  • 82.
  • 83.
  • 84.
  • 85. The Metamorphosis (1915)<br />by Franz Kafka<br />Literature<br />
  • 86. Ulysses (1922)<br />by James Joyce<br />
  • 87. The Waste Land (1922)<br />by T. S. Eliot<br />“April is the cruellest month, breeding <br />Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing <br />Memory and desire, stirring <br />Dull roots with spring rain.”<br />
  • 88. A Room of One's Own (1929)<br />by Virginia Woolf<br />
  • 89. Brave New World (1932)<br />by Aldous Huxley<br />
  • 90. Animal Farm (1945)<br />by George Orwell<br />
  • 91. Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)<br />by George Orwell<br />
  • 92. German Expressionist Film<br />The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari(1920) dir. Robert Wiene<br />
  • 93.
  • 94. Nosferatu(1922)<br />
  • 95.
  • 96. Metropolis (1927)<br />dir. Fritz Lang<br />
  • 97.
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  • 108.
  • 109. And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, <br />Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born? <br />

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