Board orientation 1 2011
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Board orientation 1 2011

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  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Enter your association’s name and logo on this cover page. You need PowerPoint and Word programs to utilized this program. Tailor it to your needs. Design it to fit your time and to focus on the key issues in your organization. You’ll need a screen and an LCD projector so that everyone can see. Have a flip chart and markers available. An effective room set up is crescent circles so that nobody has their back to the podium and you can break into small groups easily. Copies of the program can be printed and distributed to the attendees; the preference for training is to print them in PowerPoint format, “Three Up,” to leave room for taking notes. For help: Robert C. Harris, CAE - bob@hmgnet.com 335 Beard St., Tallahassee, FL USA 32303
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 The 40 or so slides are intended to require 1.5 to 3 hours to discuss. Using a flip chart and reviewing your own association documents that support the information in the slides, will easily fill the time. If you want to add topics and time, consider a slide that identifies member benefits and a discussion of each. Also consider a slide on association communications and how/when board members can expect certain communication vehicles. You may also consider starting the presentation with a history of the organization to be sure all board members understand where it has come from and how it developed. Don’t be afraid to delegate specific topics or slides to volunteers to cover and lead the discussion.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 If needed, add a second slide here to describe your organization’s additional purposes. Or use a flip chart to add purposes and objectives provided by the audience in a discussion. Be sure to assemble your organization’s own documents, such as the budget, bylaws, policy manual, to support various discussion topics associated with the slides.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 If needed, add a second slide here to describe your organization’s additional purposes. Or use a flip chart to add purposes and objectives provided by the audience in a discussion. Be sure to assemble your organization’s own documents, such as the budget, bylaws, policy manual, to support various discussion topics associated with the slides.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Enter your organization’s mission statement on the slide. The mission statement should indicate who the organization serves and what it offers. Some organization’s have two additional components that you would insert near the mission statement slide; they are a: Vision Statement - A statement indicating where the organization intends to be and how it will serve the industry 5 to 10 years from now. Value Statement - A series of statements that indicate the most important beliefs and values of the organization. For example: “We value the input and participation members.”
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Insert the organization’s value statements or remove the slide. If you don’t have value statements, discuss with the leadership what they do value in the organization. With a flipchart you may be able to identify the culture and values that have emerged as important to your organization. To help, here are value statements identified by ASAE: Visionary leadership forever open to new ideas. Integrity evidenced by ethical, honest, and credible behavior. Service to society. Dedication to the freedom to associate. Commitment to association management as a profession. Belief in the value of collaboration.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Insert the organization’s value statements or remove the slide. If you don’t have value statements, discuss with the leadership what they do value in the organization. With a flipchart you may be able to identify the culture and values that have emerged as important to your organization. To help, here are value statements identified by ASAE: Visionary leadership forever open to new ideas. Integrity evidenced by ethical, honest, and credible behavior. Service to society. Dedication to the freedom to associate. Commitment to association management as a profession. Belief in the value of collaboration.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Double click on the center of the slide to open up Microsoft Organizational Chart. Create your own organizational chart of insert your organizational chart as a file. Your organizational chart may be for the leadership, showing committees, board, subsidiaries, etc. and/or a staff organizational chart. To create a second organizational chart, go to “insert - duplicate slide” to create it. One of the most revealing discussions is to ask small leadership groups to draw their understanding of the organizational chart to determine how much they know about the association. If you don’t have an organizational chart, simply delete this slide. As an exercise, you may want to use a flip chart and discuss the structure of the association, including board, committees, subsidiaries, chapters, etc.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Insert the organization’s value statements or remove the slide. If you don’t have value statements, discuss with the leadership what they do value in the organization. With a flipchart you may be able to identify the culture and values that have emerged as important to your organization. To help, here are value statements identified by ASAE: Visionary leadership forever open to new ideas. Integrity evidenced by ethical, honest, and credible behavior. Service to society. Dedication to the freedom to associate. Commitment to association management as a profession. Belief in the value of collaboration.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Insert the organization’s value statements or remove the slide. If you don’t have value statements, discuss with the leadership what they do value in the organization. With a flipchart you may be able to identify the culture and values that have emerged as important to your organization. To help, here are value statements identified by ASAE: Visionary leadership forever open to new ideas. Integrity evidenced by ethical, honest, and credible behavior. Service to society. Dedication to the freedom to associate. Commitment to association management as a profession. Belief in the value of collaboration.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Insert the organization’s value statements or remove the slide. If you don’t have value statements, discuss with the leadership what they do value in the organization. With a flipchart you may be able to identify the culture and values that have emerged as important to your organization. To help, here are value statements identified by ASAE: Visionary leadership forever open to new ideas. Integrity evidenced by ethical, honest, and credible behavior. Service to society. Dedication to the freedom to associate. Commitment to association management as a profession. Belief in the value of collaboration.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Governing Documents Point out what you believe to be relevant in bylaws and financials. Review key points in financials; discuss the rules/limitations/financial goals. Importance of Representation Reinforce that Board members represent the entire industry, not a segment of the industry. While they may lobby for their position on matters which may be related to their segment or size within the privacy of Board meetings, their role on the Board is to represent the interests of all of the chapter members, and their public position is that of being a member-at-large.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Every association has a variety of documents that either create a framework for governance or serve as tools of governance. Many of these items will be included in a Board Orientation Manual. (For more information: http://www.hmgnet.com/nprc/references/orientation.html) These include the bylaws and articles of incorporation at a minimum. A budget outlines economic parameters and priorities. A policies and procedures manual catalogs previous motions of the board that have become policy. Every board should understand the organization’s goals, most often recorded as a strategic plan. If advocacy or lobbying is included in the mission, then position papers, statements or platforms should be available to the leaders. The key point here is that for effective leadership, “knowledge is power” and the tools of governance should be accessible to the board.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 This slide and the next will help board members understand their role and responsibilities. They can protect themselves by knowing what their responsibilities cover (and exclude.) Discuss each point to be sure it is understood; use examples as often as possible. Be sure to discuss and ask if there are questions regarding the responsibilities. Has anything been left off that they’d like to discuss or ask about?
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Be sure to discuss the importance of the board focusing on governance, strategic thinking and the future. The staff should administer to the daily needs of the organization. The chief executive officer and the executive director are the primary link between board and staff communications. Treat staff with respect; it can be difficult to replace staff who are trained in the unique aspects of nonprofit management.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Financial responsibilities are critical to board performance. Focus the leadership on finances. Spend time with the treasurer to orient him or her to policies regarding finances. Prepare a monthly financial report and distribute at a minimum to the chief elected officer and treasurer; distribute a financial report at least quarterly to the board. Take this opportunity to distribute a sample financial report to discuss the meaning of the line items and various columns.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 List your standing committees (found in the bylaws) and any task forces, ad hoc and other committees in existence.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Discuss the purpose and value of committees. How have the committee been charged with work thus far this year; are their goals and make up clear? Review the existing committees and opportunities for other workgroups to achieve the organization’s goals. Determine here if the current committees are properly appointed and charged with a plan of work. Could committees in some form serve the subgroups and special interests of members? What sort of reporting requirements are necessary to record the results of committee meetings. Consider any committees that are not performing properly and how to improve them.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Discuss how meeting notices will be distributed, including agendas, making reservations and RSVP mechanisms. Be sure to fill in the # of days prior to meetings that notice will be sent in the above slide. Discuss when and meetings are commonly held. Is there an annual calendar of meetings? What about conference calls? Are board members reimbursed for expenses; are expense forms provided? Who makes travel reservations to meetings.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 The agenda adds structure to the organization. A consent agenda, a grouping of the non-controversial issues to be voted upon at one time, will save time. The agenda protects the board from wandering into issues and discussions that may not be appropriate at a board meeting.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Many volunteer organizations are finding it difficult to recruit potential leaders. Discuss this with the board and ask how they think new leaders can be encouraged and trained. Consider leadership mentoring, ongoing leadership training, and advertising for leadership. Seek diversity and inclusivity for the make-up of the board. Consider these basic needs of leaders as described in, “Volunteers - How to Get Them, How to Keep Them,” by Helen Little. Assign specific manageable task with a beginning and end. Match volunteer interests and reasons for volunteering. Provide a good reason for doing the task. Offer written, clear instructions. Provide or set reasonable deadlines. Allow the freedom to complete the task when and where it is most convenient Provide everything necessary to complete the task w/o interruption (tools, information, help.) Offer adequate training if it is needed. Provide a safe, comfortable, and friendly working environment. Follow up to see that the task is completed. Set interim goals. Make opportunities to provide feedback. Show appreciation, recognition and rewards. Celebrate achievements.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Long range plans in some organization’s have been replaced by action plans for the year ahead or next two years, because of the pace of change. If you have a list of current goals or a strategic plan, discuss what was achieved, what is pending, and what needs to be dropped or changed. A discussion of goals for the year can take 30 minutes to several hours. Plan to use a flip chart to record the goals. As time allows, discuss the details of any goals to consider resources, timeframes, delegation, strategies, etc. A plan and goals must be consistent with the organization’s budget and committee objectives.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 You may want to ask your insurance counselor to explain insurance coverages to the board. General counsel to the association should cover risk management with the board. Point out in the budget, the costs of various insurances.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 These are three legal principles that apply to non profit boards.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 In addition to the three legal principles, many boards face concerns about antitrust and apparent authority. If you have any questions about these three topics, you should be certain to learn more about them and/or bring in a specialist (attorney, accountant, insurance consultant) to explain the importance of the three topics.
  • Board Orientation Robert C. Harris, CAE (850) 222-6000 Ask the board if they have questions that have not been answered by this orientation. Provide an evaluation form to additional input to improve next year’s orientation. If you need help with strategic planning, board orientation, association auditing or staff training, contact: Robert C. Harris, CAE 850 222 6000 335 Beard Street Tallahassee, FL 32303 USA [email_address] Association Management 101 Online© is available at the Websites of GSAE, FSAE and NJSAE.

Board orientation 1 2011 Board orientation 1 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Leadership Orientation
  • Topics
    • Purpose
    • Mission, Vision
    • Board-Staff Team
    • Board Responsibilities
    • Practical Board Tips
    • Board Meetings
    • Recruiting Leaders
    • Committees
    • Financial Issues
    • Goal Setting
    • Insurance
    • Office Operations
    Board Orientation
  • Purpose of Board Orientation
    • There are 1.4 million non-profit organizations in the USA.
    • The average number of directors is 19.
    • About 26 million persons serve on boards.
    • Training tends to be categorized as “on the job.”
    • We’re glad you’re serving on this board!
    Board Orientation
  • Purpose of Board Orientation
    • To share key information about the organization.
    • To focus on the strategic direction, mission and goals of the organization.
    • To encourage questions and to explore opportunities for the organization.
    • To manage risks associated with leadership.
    Board Orientation
  • The Mission Statement
    • The Builders Association of the Twin Cities’ fundamental purpose is to foster a healthy business environment for the homebuilding and remodeling industry, and to engage in activities that strengthen competitiveness, professionalism, and the public’s confidence in the industry.
    Board Orientation
  • How We Work (handout)
    • Place members first
    • Avoid becoming defensive. Keep an open mind
    • Maintain the highest professional standards
    • Initiative and execution are key to success
    • Perform as an unparalleled staff team
    • Work hard and be thorough
    • Reinvent ourselves
    • Seek out new opportunities
    • Act with courage, consideration and discretion
    • Constantly evaluate our operations
    Board Orientation
  • Failure is Not an Option BATC Board Orientation 1/26/2011
  • Goals for 2011
    • Cultural Shift for Staff – Tighten Operations, Reduce Expenses, Raise Revenue
    • Voter Voice Grassroots Action Network
    • Parade of Homes I-phone App and Mobile Site
    • New Membership Database
    • New Membership Website
    • Green Building Program
    • Online Education – LMS
    Board Orientation
  • Board Orientation
  • Major Benefits of BATC
    • Consumer Marketing
      • Parade of Homes / Remodelers Showcase
      • Builder / Remodeler / Associate Online Directory
      • Parade 365 Website
    • Education
      • BATC University
      • Council Educational Events
      • Online Learning
      • Builder Remodeler Product & Service Show
      • Builders Digest
    Board Orientation
  • Major Benefits of BATC
    • Government Affairs Advocacy
        • Local, State and National (BAM, NAHB)
        • In House and Contract Lobbying Team
    • Networking
      • Member Mixers
      • Builder Remodeler Product and Service Show
      • Council Events
      • Annual Gala and ROMA
      • Golf, Saints Night, IBS Reception and More
    Board Orientation
  • Major Benefits of BATC
    • Bottom Line Benefits
      • The Builders Group WC Insurance
      • Continental Western GL Insurance
      • Verizon Phone Program
      • Super America Gas Program
      • (Future) 401k Program
    Board Orientation
  • The Governing Documents
  • The Tools of Governance
    • The Bylaws
    • Articles of Incorporation
    • Strategic Plan or Goals
    • Budget for Current Year
    • Position Statements or Platform
    Board Orientation
  • Board Responsibilities
    • Determine and understand the organization’s mission and purposes.
    • Select the Executive Director (ED).
    • Support the ED and assess his or her performance.
    • Ensure organizational planning and goal setting.
    Board Orientation
  • Board Responsibilities
    • Manage the organization’s resources.
    • Determine, monitor and strengthen programs and services for members-constituents.
    • Promote the organization’s image.
    • Ensure legal and ethical integrity.
    • Help recruit new leaders.
    • Assess and measure organizational performance.
    Board Orientation
  • The Board - Staff Relationship
    • Two Elements, One Team
    • Board focuses on governance; being visionaries; strategically moving forward.
    • Staff manages the day-to-day operations.
    • Consider it a partnership , alliance , collaboration between board and staff to achieve the goals of the organization.
    • Avoid micromanagement.
    Board Orientation
  • Practical Steps for Bd. Service
    • Attend all board meetings.
    • Study and understand the mission statement, bylaws, policies and goals.
    • Prepare for meetings by reviewing the agenda and supporting documents.
    • Treat information and discussions as “confidential.”
    Board Orientation
  • Practical Steps for Bd. Service
    • Promote the organization to others.
    • Stay current on issues and trends impacting the organization and the membership.
    • Get involved in committee work.
    • Make contributions and assist with fund raising.
    Board Orientation
  • Practical Steps for Bd. Service
    • Refrain from going around the Executive Director and making special requests of the staff.
    • Readily communicate with the office for needed information and assistance.
    • Recruit future leaders to help govern the organization.
    Board Orientation
  • Show Me the Money BATC Board Orientation 1/25/2011
  • Financial Responsibilities
    • The board should carefully review all financial reports.
    • The Executive Board and Board will review and approve the annual budget.
    • The treasurer, with staff assistance, will present a financial report for the previous period, at each meeting.
    • Quarterly Review of Investments
    Board Orientation
  • Committees/Councils
    • Most organization’s utilize committees/councils.
    • They help the board get work done.
    • They identify potential leaders.
    • They serve as a way to segment and serve the interests of subgroups of members.
    Board Orientation
  • The Committees
    • Standing Committees
      • Associates
      • Awards
      • Builders Outreach Foundation
      • Education and Certification
      • Large-Volume Builders
      • Membership
      • Parade of Homes
      • Public Policy
      • Remodelers Showcase
      • Small-Volume Builders
    Board Orientation
    • 50+ Housing
    • Developers
    • Professional Women in Building
    • Remodelers (BATCR)
    • Sales & Marketing
    The Councils BATC Board Orientation 1/26/2011
  • Group/Task Forces
    • Young Professionals Group
    • Green Path Task Force
    BATC Board Orientation 1/26/2011
  • Committee Trends
    • Standing Committees - found in the bylaws, ongoing.
    • Ad Hoc & Task Forces - appointed as needed, disbanded upon completion of task.
    • Work Groups, Knowledge Networks and Special Interest Groups (SIGs) - specific in nature.
    • Virtual Committees - solves a problem without meeting in person.
    Board Orientation
  • Board Meetings
    • The Preparation
      • Notice and materials will be distributed well in advance of meetings.
      • Review the agenda to determine how you should prepare for the discussions.
      • Prepare any written reports and provide to staff in advance of the meeting.
      • Whenever possible, formulate and ask your questions before the meeting.
    Board Orientation
  • Board Meetings
    • The Agenda
      • The agenda is prepared with the input of the President, Executive Director and staff, with consideration of current issues, member needs and pending business.
      • If you have input for the agenda, be sure to provide it to the President, Executive Director, or appropriate staff, well in advance of the meeting.
    Board Orientation
  • Recruiting Leaders BATC Board Orientation 1/26/2011
  • Recruiting Leaders
    • A responsibility of board members is to identify future leaders.
    • The nominating committee plays a key role, but so does every board member.
    • Committees may be a source of future leaders.
    • Please get names of possible future board members to Executive Director.
    Board Orientation
  • Goals Set in a Strategic Plan
    • Most organizations have a strategic plan that can be used as a road map for the leadership and staff.
    • A strategic plan should be updated regularly.
    • Allows members and prospects to see the direction of the organization and understand better the ROI - return on investment.
    Board Orientation
  • Common Insurance Coverages
    • General Liability - covers property damage.
    • Directors and Officers Liability (D&O) - covers the actions of the leadership, for example antitrust violations, wrongful hiring, etc.
    • Meeting Cancellation - covers canceled meetings and the loss of anticipated profits.
    Board Orientation
  • Board Legal Considerations
    • Duty of Care
      • Good business judgment at all times.
      • Due diligence in decision making.
    • Duty of Loyalty
      • Avoid conflicts of interest.
    • Duty of Obedience
      • Faithful to the mission and goals.
      • Follow the governing documents.
    Board Orientation
  • Risk - Special Precautions *
    • Antitrust Avoidance
      • Avoid discussion of pricing.
      • Issue rejecting or removing a member.
    • Apparent Authority
      • Committees may not usurp the authority of the President.
    • IRS Issues
      • Unrelated Business Income Tax
    Board Orientation
  • A Great Opportunity BATC Board Orientation 1/26/2011
  • Thank You for Serving!
    • The board experience should be a positive one.
    • The board is the caretaker of the organization.
    • The board speaks as a whole, no board member should have more input or authority than others.
    • Always ask questions as they arise.
    • Thank you for serving on the board!
    Board Orientation