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David Segal IMTS 2010 PLM  for Value Stream Management
 

David Segal IMTS 2010 PLM for Value Stream Management

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Application of PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) methodologies to facilitate Lean Manufacturing and Engineering. Particular use of PLM for Lean Product Development and enterprise Value Streams ...

Application of PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) methodologies to facilitate Lean Manufacturing and Engineering. Particular use of PLM for Lean Product Development and enterprise Value Streams Management

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    David Segal IMTS 2010 PLM  for Value Stream Management David Segal IMTS 2010 PLM for Value Stream Management Presentation Transcript

    • David SEGAL Director, Industrial Equipment Industry Market Development Dassault Systèmes
    • Agenda - Built “Top-Down”: Copyright Dassault Systèmes – 2010 – All rights reserved
    • To succeed in this market…. Customers demand: Manufacturers challenge: More value, service and product How focus on customer needs and still performance for lower price remain profitable? Line integration for requirements More value, service and product and regulations performance at lower cost Post sale asset management Innovation for more complex products On-site engineering support and faster time to market More complex products Manage global supply chains and Multiple systems extended value streams Multiple product configurations Innovate to respond to the industry Etc… evolution and emerging markets Enable sustainable growth
    • Focus on product value streams  At core of lean principles is a focus on what customers want, identifying anything that doesn’t add value in providing a product or service (waste), and then eliminating or minimizing those wastes.  Hundreds of activities, processes and inputs bring a product or service to market (i.e., a value stream).  Value streams run from the furthest supplier out to end customers, with inputs from many functions (sales, procurement, development, etc.)  Value-stream view of processes: asking whether each step adds value for the end customer, or does a step actually waste time, movement, or resources?
    • Lean, in a nutshell FORD (H. Ford) 1913 GM (A.Sloan) +/- 1930 Toyota, Taiichi Ohno +/- 1950 James Womack, 1990 THE LEAN PRINCIPLES TYPES OF MUDA (waste) 1) Precisely specify value 2) Identify value stream 3) Make value flow without interruptions 4) Let customer pull value 5) Pursue perfection www.vision-lean.com
    • Value Stream Management Starts with understanding of Customer Values Customer values differ from customer requirements Requires the development of core systems that ensure the ability to create these values: Value Stream Knowledge Mapping Manufacturing Capitalization So , Value Stream Management can be defined to be… Distribution Procurement Sales Product Marketing Development Engineering Regulatory
    • Value Stream Management Value Stream Need for a Systemic View Knowledge Mapping Capitalization Complexity of conflicting values Dependency and interrelationships Changes and transformation of values Collaborative Unified Management Vision Environment
    • PLM and Value Stream Management Aligning value streams to customer and business needs “The difference between profitable and unprofitable value streams is how much usable knowledge is created and delivered by development. So, the primary wastes in development are connected to knowledge, not physical transformation.” Allen Ward, Lean Product and Process Development, The Lean Enterprise Institute, March 2007. Typical Value Stream Driven by Lean Manufacturing… Teams tend to 97% Non VA 3% VA evaluate processes by focusing only on actions where Most process improvement teams something is being attack this (Value Activities) done to the product 97% Non VA Achieve this … And ignore this
    • PLM and Value Stream Management Aligning value streams to customer and business needs “The difference between profitable and unprofitable value streams is how much usable knowledge is created and delivered by development. So, the primary wastes in development are connected to knowledge, not physical transformation.” Allen Ward, Lean Product and Process Development, The Lean Enterprise Institute, March 2007. Typical Value Stream Driven by Lean Manufacturing… Teams tend to 97% Non VA 3% VA evaluate processes by focusing only on actions where something is being done to the product  Knowledge-Based Process Automation  Knowledge-Based Product Engineering
    • PLM and Value Stream Management Knowledge-Based Process Automation and Engineering Impact on R&D and Design Global, Complex, Multi-discipline Engineering and development costs control Impact on sourcing/supplier management Global Collaboration across supply chain for NPI and ETO processes Impact on manufacturing Production lines balancing, simulation and automation Impact on distribution Global inventory and assets management Impact on customer service and support Voice of the Customer and early product experience in the Engineering process (Digital roll-out)
    • PLM 2.0 for Lean Engineering “A Global Development Environment that provides value- streams optimization Experience from Bidding to Commissioning and Lifelike Experience to Produce deliver Experience First Time Right Innovative and Sustainable Products” Collaborate Simulate Design ©Dassault Systèmes 2009– Customer and DS Channels personal use only
    • People PLM 2.0 for Lean Engineering Devices/Products/Services Lifelike Experience Collaborative Innovation IP Modeling & Simulation Realistic Digital Virtual Design Manufacturing Simulation & Production Middleware platforms 12 ©Dassault Systèmes 2009– Customer and DS Channels personal use only
    • Industrial Equipment Domains Overview Enterprise Business Processes Systems Engineering Processes Product Engineering Processes Manufacturing Processes Service & Support Processes
    • Industrial Equipment Roles Services Technical Writer Production Engineer Instructions Designer Customer Resource Programmer Tooling Designer Sales Process Planner Project Manager Quality Engineer Product Manager Simulation Systems Standard Manager Suppliers Engineer Engineer Controls Mechanical Engineer Engineer Buyer Standard Designer Electrical Engineer Fluidics Engineer
    • Industrial Equipment Value Activities Project Design Start Of Product Manuf. End Of RFX Order Validation Validation Ship Deliver Carry Over Validation Prod. Life 1 Customer Product Systems Architect Engineer Sales Mechanical Engineer Product Manager Electrical Engineer Project Manager Controls Engineer Buyer Bidding Phase Standard Fluidics Engineer Manager
    • Industrial Equipment Value Activities Project Design Start Of Product Manuf. End Of RFX Order Validation Validation Ship Deliver Carry Over Validation Prod. Life 2 Customer Product Systems Architect Engineer Sales Mechanical Process Planner Engineer Product Manager Quality Tooling Designer Electrical Engineer Engineer Project Manager Resource Programmer Controls Suppliers Engineer Buyer Detailed Design Standard Fluidics Engineer Phase Manager Simulation Standard Designer Engineer
    • Industrial Equipment Value Activities Project Design Start Of Product Manuf. End Of RFX Order Validation Validation Ship Deliver Carry Over Validation Prod. Life 3 Customer Product Systems Architect Engineer Sales Mechanical Process Planner Engineer Product Manager Quality Tooling Designer Electrical Engineer Engineer Project Manager Resource Programmer Controls Suppliers Engineer Buyer Instructions Production Phase Designer Technical Fluidics Writer Standard Engineer Manager Simulation Production Standard Designer Services Engineer Engineer
    • Industrial Equipment Value Activities Project Design Start Of Product Manuf. End Of RFX Order Validation Validation Ship Deliver Carry Over Validation Prod. Life 4 Customer Sales Product Manager Quality Engineer Project Manager Suppliers Instructions Implement & Maintain Designer Technical Writer Phase Production Services Engineer
    • Industrial Equipment Processes Overview Project Design Start Of Product Manuf. End Of RFX Order Validation Validation Ship Deliver Carry Over Validation Prod. Life Products Portfolio & Requirements Management Enterprise Projects Management Regulatory Management Quote to Order Management Suppliers & Sourcing Management Systems Engineering Product Architecture & Synthesis Structure & Body Design Mechanical Design Enterprise Business Analysis & Simulation Processes Systems Engineering Processes Product Virtual Commissioning Product Engineering Processes Manufacturing & Production Operations Manufacturing Processes Service & Service & Support Engineering / Operations Support Processes
    • PLM supports value-stream continuous improvement Applying continuous improvement across a value stream relies on basic lean principles: Minimizing waste Lowering costs Improving productivity Enhancing revenue generation through better use of assets Improving ROI PLM enables efficiency fundamentals: System Stability - All participants need to access a single, consistent data source Process Standardization - Definition and capture of standard reference processes is a must in a value stream Correction and Improvement - Problems and improvement opportunities should be identified, analyzed, and eliminated quickly
    • PLM supports value-stream continuous improvement “In some cases, application of Lean Principles has provided a 60-70% reduction in product development time.” Clifford Fiore, Accelerated Product Development, Productivity Press, New York, 2005 Metrics Improvement Product “Lean Product Development offers Development 60-70% reduction by far the greatest potential for a Cycle Times competitive advantage for any Bid-Win strike rate From 10 to 40 % consumer driven company and is a Time to design 20-30 % reduction critical component in dealing with the many environmental Engineering change 10 -20 % reduction challenges that all companies must process cycle time now take into consideration.” Time to The Toyota Product Development 10-15 % reduction Manufacture System, Morgan & Liker, 2006. Time to find 50-60% reduction information Design errors 50 -60 % reduction
    • DI
    • David SEGAL david.segal@3ds.com @davesegal28 /in/davesegal “David Segal PLM” Dassault Systèmes
    • Dassault Systèmes
    • Impact on sourcing/supplier management Participation in new-product development: “Managing Supply Chains for Growth and Efficiency,” Industry Week and IBM Global Services, January 2008.
    • Impact on customer service and support Collaborative Design with Suppliers and Customers Source: 2009 MPI Manufacturing Study, Manufacturing Performance Institute, 2009.
    • Video
    • Impact on R&D and Design Collaborative Multi-discipline Engineering