Hernan cortes   el conquistador de mexico
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Hernan cortes el conquistador de mexico

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Conquista de America

Conquista de America

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Hernan cortes   el conquistador de mexico Hernan cortes el conquistador de mexico Presentation Transcript

  • HernHernán Cortán Cortééss El conquistador del imperio azteco
  • King Charles VKing Charles V  In the 1500s Spain was a monarchy, which means they had a King or Queen who governed the country.  Thus all the Spanish- controlled colonies in New World were under the control of the Spanish King, Charles V.  He operated through the Governors in the new colonies that he appointed to do his bidding.
  • SpainSpain
  • HernHernán Cortán Cortééss  Cortez was born in Medellín, España in 1485.  Upon hearing the insane tales of the New World from the crew of Columbus he decided to pursue the treasures of the newly discovered America.
  • The legend of El DoradoThe legend of El Dorado  The crewmen told stories of beautiful, tropical foreign lands with plentiful fruits and easily enslaveable people.  However, the most enchanting tales for the young Cortez were those of the plentiful gold in the New World.  El Dorado means “the golden one” in Spanish, and signifies a mythic Indian city of gold.
  • EspaEspañaña
  • Diego VelDiego Velásquezásquez  Shortly he was contracted by the Governor of Hispañola, Diego Velásquez, to fight an Indian uprising near the Spanish colony.  He was awarded an encomienda after efficiently slaughtering a Native uprising in what is now the Dominican Republic. Diego Velásquez
  • La encomiendaLa encomienda  La encomienda was a system similar to feudalism of Mid-Evil times in Europe.  Under la encomienda system, peasant slaves worked for the wealthy King or landowner.  Spaniards made the local people pay a tax in gold or in slave labor every three months or else they were punished severely.
  • Indigenous Resistance toIndigenous Resistance to Spanish RuleSpanish Rule  The Spaniards profited immensely from the situation while the Native people were made into slaves.  The results on the natives were usually revolt, suicide, emigration or they were killed for non- compliance.
  • La sistema de la encomiendaLa sistema de la encomienda
  • Slaves in the New WorldSlaves in the New World
  • New World PoliticsNew World Politics  As a result of the successful slaughter of the Native people, Cortez would receive a promotion in the Spanish army would and eventually help conquer what is now modern day Cuba.
  • ReconnaissanceReconnaissance  Velásquez sent out reconnaissance missions to the mainland to find future colony sites for the expanding Spanish Empire.
  • ReconnaissanceReconnaissance  Word comes back to Governor Velásquez that the mainland (Mexico) has a much more advanced and prosperous civilization than that of the Caribbean Indians.  Rumors of a great civilization inland entice the conquistadors with gold, but frighten them because of their religious practices of human sacrifice.  Governor Velásquez sends Cortez to further explore the area and bring back proof of an advanced and prosperous civilization that would make Charles V happy.
  • Bon VoyageBon Voyage  Cortez sails with 11 ships, 110 sailors, 570 soldiers, 250 Indian slaves and supplies from Cuba to what is now mainland Mexico.  He arrives and “founds” the city of Vera Cruz.
  • Fleet lands in Mexico,1519Fleet lands in Mexico,1519
  • Cortez Changes PlansCortez Changes Plans  Cortez, being the greedy and ambitious conquistador that he is, arrives to Mexico and declares himself leader, independent of Velasquez’s authority.  He quickly destroys all the ships but one, thus forcing everyone to go with him and preventing desertion.  The army then proceeds to communicate with the natives to find out where this wealthy civilization is so that they may conquer it.
  • MalincheMalinche
  • MalincheMalinche  Malinche was an Indigenous woman who could speak both the Nahuatal and Mayan languages.  She became the translator for Cortez in his mission to conquer Mexico.  She was baptized by Cortez as Doña Marina.
  • QuetzalcoatlQuetzalcoatl  Malinche tells Cortez of the legend of Quetzalcoatl.  Aztec prophecy said that the white skinned and bearded God Quetzalcoatl would return to Tenochitlan and regain his thrown one day.
  • Cortez and Indigenous PoliticsCortez and Indigenous Politics  Malinche tells Cortez of the Aztecs, the most powerful civilization of Central America.  However, the most powerful civilization is sure to have many enemies.  Thus Cortez begins allying himself and politicking with the weaker tribes to gain support for an assault on Tenochitlan, the capital city of the Aztec Empire.
  • Indigenous AlliancesIndigenous Alliances Cortez befriends some of the enemies of the Aztecs, the Tlaxcaltecas. The Aztecs had conquered the Tlaxcaltecas and were taxing them. Thus the Spanish and the Tlaxcaltecas and the Spaniards join forces for an assault on the Aztecs in their capital city, Tenochitlan.
  • The return of QuetzalquatlThe return of Quetzalquatl  Hearing of light-skinned bearded men, Montezuma sends gifts of gold to the Spanish troops.  Montezuma believed that Quetzalquatl could return to regain his thrown and he wanted to treat him with the utmost respect and graciousness.
  • Gifts to CortezGifts to Cortez
  • Map of the Aztec EmpireMap of the Aztec Empire
  • TenochitlanTenochitlan
  • Montezuma, Ruler of theMontezuma, Ruler of the Aztec PeopleAztec People
  • The Arrival of CortezThe Arrival of Cortez
  • Cortez and MontezumaCortez and Montezuma
  • Cortez and MontezumaCortez and Montezuma  Because of the Aztec Prophecy of Quetzalcoatl, Montezuma hands the thrown over to Cortez, believing him to be the God Quetzalcoatl.  Cortez cordially accepts the thrown of the Aztec Empire, but quickly must leave to fight his own people, the Spanish.
  • Pesky VelasquezPesky Velasquez  Upon hearing the Cortez had renounced his authority, Velasquez sends 18 ships and 1300 men to kill the rebel Cortez in Mexico for not following orders.  Thus the new ruler of the Aztec Empire must leave Tenochitlán to fight the oncoming battle from Cortez.
  • Cortez the Smooth TalkerCortez the Smooth Talker  Cortez meets the oncoming Spanish army sent by Velasquez and easily convinces them to join him in his scheme in Tenochitlan.  They accept and quickly return to the Aztec capital.
  • While you were away….While you were away….  In Cortez’ absence, his men slaughtered and tortured a few Aztecs and caused rampant hatred for them among the locals.  Thus Cortez and his men were forced to retreat from the city and regroup.
  • SmallpoxSmallpox  The Spanish do retreat, but leave an unknown plague upon the Aztec people: smallpox.  The disease begins to ravage the city killing an estimated 9 out of every ten people.
  • Cortez the ConquerorCortez the Conqueror When Cortez and his army ofiIndigenous ally soldiers return, they can smell Tenochitlán before they can see it from the rotting bodies from the outbreak of smallpox. They easily conquer the city and Cortez becomes the ruler of the largest city in the Spanish Empire.
  • Attack on TenochitlanAttack on Tenochitlan
  • Cortez Is Called to Spain byCortez Is Called to Spain by King Carlos VKing Carlos V  Despite his success crushing the Atzec capital of Tenochitlán, Cortez must return to Spain to appear in Spanish Royal Court because of his rebellion against Velasquez.  His power in Mexico is never the same.
  • Death of the Greatest of AllDeath of the Greatest of All ConquistadorsConquistadors  Cortez dies in Spain in 1547, having lost all influence in his accomplishments.