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Seductive Online Program for Adult Learners

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  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • From Cognitve Surplus, Clay Shirky p70Edward Deci – Soma puzzle game experiment.Subjects given complex puzzle – then given a break where there were plentyof other distractions. Subjects were observed during their break and manycontinued working on puzzle.Second session – half of the subjects were paid for each puzzle they solved –again they were give a break, again they were observed, the subjects that werepaid, experimented more than they had previously.Third session – run exactly like the first one. No one is paid. The ones that hadbeen paid previously showed markedly less interest in working through theirbreak. The subjects that had never been paid remained relatively constant.Doing something because it interests you, makes it a different kind of activitythan doing it because you are reaping an external reward.Intrinsic motivations are those in which the activity itself is the reward. Extrinsicmotivations are those in which the reward for doing something is external to theactivity, not the activity itself.Deci identified two intrinsic (personal) motivations:1. The desire to be autonomous (to determine what we do and how we do it).2. The desire to be competent (to be good at what we do).Video game studies conclude that the principle draw is the feelings ofcontrol and competence the players attain as they master the game.
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • Backward design – “Understanding by Design” http://www.mtace.org/pirday_sept2010/Intro%20to%20UBD%20Handout.pdfGrant Wiggins and Jay McTighe

Transcript

  • 1. Seductive Online Program forAdult Learners:Designing Courses and Curricula for Engagement
  • 2. Presenters Val Kelly Dr. David Robins Director of Online Learning Assistant Professor Kent State University School of Library & Information Science Kent State University
  • 3. Agenda User CurriculumInstructional Experience Design Design Design Example with Val Kelly with Dave Robins with Dave & Val Everything is Designed. Few things are designed well Brian Reed
  • 4. Instructional Design Designing to Learn
  • 5. The Next Generation of…Online Learning atKent State University
  • 6. PLANNING is Important
  • 7. Find out where you arePROCESS is Important Analysis before you begin. Create a pedagogical Design framework. Digitize content and build Development course structure. Provide support for Implementation instructors. Review student and Evaluation instructor feedback.
  • 8. Find out where you are Analysis before you begin. Create a pedagogical DesignDESIGN is Important framework. Digitize content and build Development course structure. Provide support for Implementation instructors. Review student and Evaluation instructor feedback.
  • 9. Online = TransparencyTransparency = Evaluation, Review, Revision Best Design Practices Emerge!
  • 10. What do we know about Design?
  • 11. Bad Design = Frustration
  • 12. Teachers –Design to We need you!facilitateteachingTeaching is much, much morethan content development &delivery.
  • 13. Or a vast, connectedCOMMUNITY is Important Is online a solitary world? community?
  • 14. Creating Community
  • 15. The online community includes places for… Interactions Student to Teacher Student to Content Student to Student
  • 16. Goals and Objectives are Instead of this…. • Start with a mixture of calcium, silicon, aluminum & iron • Mix 1 part calcium, silicon aluminum & iron mixture with 2 parts sand and 3 parts gravel. Add water until mixture becomes Important malleable enough to pour into a form.
  • 17. Design with your Goal in mindStart with this….• By the end of this program, students will be able to understand the principles of sustainability and design a sustainable structure. It will look something like this:
  • 18. Use Backward Design• Identify desired results.• Determine acceptable evidence.• Plan learning experiences and instruction. “Understanding by Design” Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe
  • 19. Design for SuccessCreate Attainable Learning Objectives
  • 20. Design pathways to achieve objectivesTell Students how each objective gets them closer to their goal.You are here Now you are here. Read this. Demonstrate this.Do this. Listen to this. Discuss this.
  • 21. Understanding Student Intrinsic MotivationMotivations is Important the activity itself is the reward Extrinsic Motivation the reward for doing something is external to the activity, not the activity itself.
  • 22. Understanding Student Intrinsic MotivatorsMotivations is Important 1. The desire to be autonomous (to determine what we do and how we do it). 2. The desire to be competent (to be good at what we do). Extrinsic Motivators 1. Grades 2. Punishment
  • 23. Design for Autonomy
  • 24. Design for Competence
  • 25. How good is your memory?List the animals you justsaw…
  • 26. What if they were ordered like this…
  • 27. Design for CompetenceSometimes courses look like this…
  • 28. Design for the student perspectiveWhat does your course look like through a student’s eyes?
  • 29. User Experience Design Dave Robins
  • 30. User Experience ... a persons perceptions and responses that result from the use or anticipated use of a product, system or service.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_experienceISO FDIS 9241-210:2009. Ergonomics of human system interaction – Part 210: Human-centered design forinteractive systems (formerly known as 13407). International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Switzerland.
  • 31. User Experience ... includes all the users emotions, beliefs, preferences, perceptions, physical and psychological responses, behaviours and accomplishments that occur before, during and after use.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_experienceISO FDIS 9241-210:2009. Ergonomics of human system interaction – Part 210: Human-centered design forinteractive systems (formerly known as 13407). International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Switzerland.
  • 32. Designing User ExperienceJesse James GarretElements of User Experience Design
  • 33. The flip side of designEvaluation
  • 34. Usability as Evaluation
  • 35. We try to measure and evaluate• Ease of use• Affordance• Barriers to effective use• Know our audienceFor example…
  • 36. Platform PedalsPlatform pedals Platform pedals• Easy to useFor some…Not forothers…
  • 37. Know your audienceFor a competitive cyclist = among other difficulties
  • 38. For most of the 20th century we had…Toe clips
  • 39. A simpler idea
  • 40. Clipless pedals
  • 41. A more pertinent example…
  • 42. GUI
  • 43. Mobile
  • 44. The experience is the productPeter Merholz, 16 (Mostly Difficult) Steps to Becoming a CustomerExperience-Based Organization
  • 45. Emotion/Seduction/Motivation
  • 46. Which experience?
  • 47. Seductive Design
  • 48. What is Seductive Design?Piano Stairs
  • 49. Limits of EvaluationPiano Stairs
  • 50. Makes use of human traitsto create engagement Challenge Want to be heroes Status Collectors
  • 51. About humans…About humans…• We’re curious• We’re afraid of change• We seek out patterns• We like to order and organize things• We’re intensely self-centered• We’re lazy• We’re highly visual thinkers and learners• We like to be the hero of the story• We respond to our name and other first person cues• We don’t like to make choices, but we like choice• We like to be in control (and we like to be guided)• We find novelty and surprise interesting• … and on and on
  • 52. About humans… What’s in the cards? Stephen Anderson, Mental Notes http://getmentalnotes.com/
  • 53. Recognize this?
  • 54. About humans…About humans…• We’re curious• We’re afraid of change• We seek out patterns• We like to order and organize things• We’re intensely self-centered• We’re lazy• We’re highly visual thinkers and learners• We like to be the hero of the story• We respond to our name and other first person cues• We don’t like to make choices, but we like choice• We like to be in control (and we like to be guided)• We find novelty and surprise interesting• … and on and on
  • 55. Design ExamplesUser Experience Design, Seductive Design, and Curriculum Design Seductive Design, and Curriculum Design
  • 56. Analysis Curriculum Find out where you are before you begin.
  • 57. Who are our potential students?Personas
  • 58. Who are our competitors?
  • 59. Fine Arts (Interaction Design) HCISome Related Programs Interaction Design Multimedia Design Database Design Web Design Information Design
  • 60. Interaction Design Savannah College of Art & Design Carnegie Mellon University School of Visual Arts (NYC) University of Baltimore HCI Carnegie Mellon University Rensselaer Polytechnic InstituteOther Programs Rochester Institute of Technology Multimedia Design Regent University Web and/or Database University of Denver Design Information Design Bentley University Information Florida State University (concentration) Architecture
  • 61. What do UX Professionals Do?Are there jobs for our graduates?
  • 62. User Experience Design InformationArchitecture Interaction Design User Content Studies Strategy Information Usability Design
  • 63. UserExperience work in teams to Manage ProjectsDesigners involving Design/ Evaluation Research Organization through of Information/Content to via Understand Usability Context Information Content and Testing Architecture Strategy Users communicate their designs/results via Deliverables to Stakeholders Team Members Developers Visual Designers
  • 64. How suitable is our curriculum?Curriculum Audit
  • 65. Curriculum (Current)IAKM Core IAKM in Context Knowledge Organization SystemsUXD Required Information Architecture I Usability I Information Technologies Information and Visual Design Researching the User ExperienceUXD Electives Information Architecture II Usability II User and Task Analysis Content Management Systems Many others from different disciplines
  • 66. Needed Additions to Curriculum• Social Media• Mobile Design• Natural User Interface (NUI)• Rich interactions/applications/visualization• Project Management• Presenting deliverables to stakeholders• Ethics• Content Strategy• Remote Usability• Design methods (e.g. “agile,” “waterfall”)• Other?
  • 67. 10 “Carousel” CoursesCourse Action Area FieldKnowledge Organization Systems Organization Information ArchitectureContent Strategy Organization, Design Information ArchitectureUsability Testing Evaluation UsabilityAlternative Usability Testing Evaluation UsabilityInformation & Visual Design Organization, Design Information Design Information Architecture,Markup and Presentation Organization, Design Information Design Information Architecture,Information Technology Design Information DesignInformation Architecture Organization, Design Information ArchitectureUser and Task Analysis Research User StudiesResearching the User Experience Research User Studies
  • 68. Proposed Introductory Courses1. User Experience Design 2. User Experience Design Theory and Context Processes and Deliverablesis the is theWho WhenWhat HowWhere ofWhy Communicationof through, and development ofEvaluation DeliverablesDesign for UserResearch Experiencefor Design Information Interaction Architecture Design Content Information Strategy Design User Usability Studies
  • 69. Design Curriculum Create a pedagogical framework.
  • 70. Start with your Goal in mindBy the end of this program, students will be able tomake good experiences GREAT.Our Guiding Principles for the Program:LUMEN• Learn: Research/Collect/Gather/Filter/Group/Context• Understand: Model/Requirements• iMagine: Design/Make/Sketch• Evaluate: Prototype/Test• iNform: Reports/Explanations/Describe
  • 71. Determine acceptable evidence.How will are students show their proficiency in UxD?Student portfolios tell our storyStudents will…Build a portfolio containing deliverables from allcore learning areas, including: • Information architecture • User studies • Usability • Interaction design • Content strategy • Information design
  • 72. Plan Learning Experiences & InstructionsWhat activities will allow students to become GREATUser Experience Designers? Students will… • Interact with industry experts • Build a portfolio • Develop a toolkit (bag of tricks) • Create a sketch book of ideas • Contribute to the Inspiration Library • Participate in group work • Present their own designs to clients • Evaluate designs
  • 73. Create a Learning CommunityStudent to Instructor InteractionsInstructor will… Give video orientation to self and course. Provide Feedback - Detailed feedback on first draft and final portfolio submissions and any other assignments. Discussion Boards - Weekly audio summary - Written replies Email - Respond to any email within 24 hours Live Chat - Be available for scheduled chats (office hours) Podcasts - Will create audio podcasts of interesting events. Assessments - Provide timely assessments on discussions, quizzes and project work.
  • 74. Create a Learning CommunityStudent to Content InteractionsCourse will contain… Readings Audio lectures including many from leading professionals Video Discussion Boards Inspiration Library Written communication Podcasts Web links Self-tests with feedback
  • 75. Create a Learning CommunityStudent to Student InteractionsStudents will… Post on discussion boards Respond to peers on discussion boards Participate in group projects Give recorded presentations Participate in peer evaluations Participate in live chats where possible
  • 76. What will these 7 week courses look like? Week 1 Course overview Short recorded lecture Introductions covering main points of Weekly discussion of topic and readings Short multiple choice quiz over readings/topic topic/readings Week 2 Short recorded lecture Weekly discussion of Project or projectCourse Wireframes covering main points of topic and readings phase due topic/readings Week 3 Short recorded lecture covering main points of Weekly discussion of topic and readings Short multiple choice quiz over readings/topic topic/readings Week 4 Short recorded lecture covering main points of Weekly discussion of topic and readings Project or project phase due topic/readings Week 5 Short recorded lecture covering main points of Weekly discussion of topic and readings Short multiple choice quiz over readings/topic topic/readings Week 6 Short recorded lecture covering main points of Weekly discussion of topic and readings Project or project phase due topic/readings Week 7 Course wrap-up Short recorded lecture covering main points of Weekly discussion of topic and readings Short multiple choice quiz over readings/topic Portfolio feedback topic/readings
  • 77. Analysis Find out where you are before you beginDesign Create a pedagogical framework.Develop Build Curriculum Structure.Implement Provide Instructor TrainingEvaluate Review student and instructor feedback
  • 78. Courses &Seductive Design Curriculum A few quick examples.
  • 79. Problem Statement Problem: Discussions online are not lively – “I agree with so and so…” Students don’t participate until the midnight of the night it is due – leaving no time for an actual “discussion”.
  • 80. Solution: Use Limited Duration Solution: Use “Limited Duration” to limit times when participation can take place. Model:
  • 81. Problem Statement Problem: Students are more concerned about earning a grade than acquiring new knowledge and skills.
  • 82. Solution: Autonomy Have students create portfolios. Let Solution: Students choose own projects. Give them opportunities to display work at conferences. Continue to build relationships Model: with companies like FatDUX to sponsor student presentations at Conferences.
  • 83. Problem Statement Problem: Students start to lose interest part way through the course.
  • 84. Solution: Triggers Solution: Create “Triggers” to alert students to events in the class in the industry Pass along invitations to Model: Webinars, meetings and other professional activities.
  • 85. Problem Statement Problem: In a 7 week course, students have little time to learn their way around the course and learn new technologies
  • 86. Solution: Pattern Recognition Create uniform navigation. Make Solution: consistent use of tools. Make each course follow similar patterns. INTRODUCTION About the Course Meet Your Instructor Introduce Yourself Model: CONTENT Home Weekly Modules INFORMATION Announcements Ask Questions Office Hours Tech Help ASSIGNMENTS & GRADES Discussions Self-Tests Weekly Assignments Portfolio Submissions My Grades
  • 87. Dave Robins & Val KellyThank you for attendingAny Questions?
  • 88. References• Wiggins, Grant and Tighe, Jay (2005). Understanding by Design (2nd Edition). Merrill/Prentice Hall.• Smith, Robin (2008). Conquering Content: A Step-by-Step Guide to Online Course Design. Jossey-Bass.• Palloff, Rena and Pratt, Keith (2007). Online Learning Communities: Strategies for the Virtual Classroom. Wiley & Sons, Inc.• Anderson, Stephen (2011). Seductive Interactive Design: Creating Playful, Fun, and Effective User Experience. New Riders.• Norman, Donald (1990). The design of everyday things. Doubleday Business.• Norman, Donald. (2004). Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things. Basic Books.• Merholz, Peter, Schauer, Brandon, Verba, David, & Wilkens, Todd (2010). Subject to change: creating great products and services for an uncertain world. OReilly Media.• Garrett, Jesse James (2010). The elements of user experience (2nd Edition). New Riders Press.• Saffer, Dan (2009). Designing for interaction (2nd Edition). Voices that Matter.• Cooper, Alan (2004). The Inmates are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity. Sams - Pearson Education.• Unger, Russ, & Chandler, Carolyn (2009).A Project Guide to UX Design: For user experience designers in the field or in the making. New Riders Press.• Wilson, Chauncey (Ed.) (2009). User-experience re-mastered: Your Guide to Getting the Right Design. Morgan Kaufmann.