technical drawing
introduction <ul><li>Technical drawings:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clearly define aspects of engineered items </li></ul></ul>...
obstacles between the real world and your drawing <ul><li>We live in a 3-dimensional world. </li></ul><ul><li>Paper constr...
solutions <ul><li>3-dimensional objects can be represented in a 2D space by two primary methods: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ort...
orthographic projection <ul><li>Orthographic projection uses multiple views of the subject, from points of view rotated ab...
isometric projection <ul><li>Isometric projection captures the object from an upward angle and disregards perspective </li...
dimensioning <ul><li>Dimensions in cooperation with a drawing should provide sufficient information to allow anyone to mac...
dimensioning types <ul><li>Parallel dimensioning: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parallel dimensioning consists of several dimensio...
dimensioning types <ul><li>Superimposed Running Dimensions </li></ul><ul><li>The common origin for the dimension lines is ...
dimensioning types <ul><li>Chain Dimensioning </li></ul><ul><li>Chains of dimension should only be used if the function of...
dimensioning types <ul><li>Dimensioning by Co-ordinates </li></ul><ul><li>Two sets of superimposed running dimensions runn...
line styles <ul><li>visible lines  - are continuous lines used to depict edges directly visible from a particular angle.  ...
why? <ul><li>If you want your idea or mechanism to be seriously considered, submit technical drawing demonstrating the fun...
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Technical Drawing

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An introduction to the styles and importance of technical drawing

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Technical Drawing

  1. 1. technical drawing
  2. 2. introduction <ul><li>Technical drawings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clearly define aspects of engineered items </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conform to standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimize confusion </li></ul></ul>1.8ish Build this!
  3. 3. obstacles between the real world and your drawing <ul><li>We live in a 3-dimensional world. </li></ul><ul><li>Paper constrains us to 2 dimensions. </li></ul><ul><li>You cannot easily measure a drawing. </li></ul>
  4. 4. solutions <ul><li>3-dimensional objects can be represented in a 2D space by two primary methods: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Orthographic Projection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Isometric Projection </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. orthographic projection <ul><li>Orthographic projection uses multiple views of the subject, from points of view rotated about the subject's center through increments of 90°. </li></ul>
  6. 6. isometric projection <ul><li>Isometric projection captures the object from an upward angle and disregards perspective </li></ul><ul><li>This can cause some confusing issues </li></ul>
  7. 7. dimensioning <ul><li>Dimensions in cooperation with a drawing should provide sufficient information to allow anyone to machine the object. </li></ul><ul><li>With complex objects involving many dimensions, dimensioning can get messy. </li></ul>
  8. 8. dimensioning types <ul><li>Parallel dimensioning: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Parallel dimensioning consists of several dimensions originating from one projection line. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. dimensioning types <ul><li>Superimposed Running Dimensions </li></ul><ul><li>The common origin for the dimension lines is indicated by a small circle at the intersection of the first dimension and the projection line. </li></ul>
  10. 10. dimensioning types <ul><li>Chain Dimensioning </li></ul><ul><li>Chains of dimension should only be used if the function of the object won't be affected by the accumulation of the tolerances. </li></ul>
  11. 11. dimensioning types <ul><li>Dimensioning by Co-ordinates </li></ul><ul><li>Two sets of superimposed running dimensions running at right angles can be used with any features which need their centre points defined, such as holes. </li></ul>
  12. 12. line styles <ul><li>visible lines - are continuous lines used to depict edges directly visible from a particular angle. </li></ul><ul><li>hidden lines - are short-dashed lines that may be used to represent edges that are not directly visible. </li></ul><ul><li>center lines - are alternately long- and short-dashed lines that may be used to represent the axes of circular features. </li></ul>
  13. 13. why? <ul><li>If you want your idea or mechanism to be seriously considered, submit technical drawing demonstrating the functionality and form. </li></ul>
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