The Top Ten Intellectual Property Mistakes of 
                    Small to Mid­Size Technology Companies 
          © 200...
6     Treating the federal government like 
      non­governmental infringers 
                                           ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Top Ten Intellectual Property Mistakes Of Small To Mid Sizetechnology Companies

255 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
255
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Top Ten Intellectual Property Mistakes Of Small To Mid Sizetechnology Companies

  1. 1. The Top Ten Intellectual Property Mistakes of  Small to Mid­Size Technology Companies  © 2006­2009 Dana H. Shultz – Readers may reproduce and distribute copies of this article in its entirety.  Small and mid­size technology companies have their hands full. Everywhere one looks, there are a dozen  challenges and a hundred things to do.  Intellectual property (IP) rarely escapes their attention. But even more rarely is IP treated as carefully as it should  be. Here – not necessarily in order of importance – are the top ten IP mistakes that I have seen among small and  mid­size technology companies:  1  Failing to use employee invention  agreements  3  Using another company’s license  agreement  Generally, but subject to certain exceptions,  Trying to minimize legal expenses, a CEO  companies do not own patentable inventions  copied provisions from another company’s  that employees develop on the job unless there  enterprise software license into his company’s  is an agreement by which the employee  agreement for wireless­application software –  assigns the invention to the company.  even though the enterprise terms made no  sense in the wireless industry.  An invention assignment agreement can help  the company by requiring that employees: The results: Customer confusion, protracted  negotiations, intense frustration and delayed  · Document inventions, assign all rights to the  revenue recognition. The company would  company, and assist the company in  have been better off paying for the right  perfecting those rights. agreement in the first place.  · Maintain company and third­party  information in confidence. · Not disclose former employers’ confidential  4  Thinking that patents are the only IP  that matters  information to the company.  Patents are great: They let you stop others  California employers need to consider,  from making, using, selling, offering to sell or  however, Labor Code Section 2870(a), which  importing your invention. But other types of  precludes assignment of certain inventions  IP can be great, too. Among these are: developed on the employee’s own time  · Copyrights, which protect against  without using the company’s equipment,  unauthorized copying of creative works. supplies, facilities or trade secrets.  · Trade secrets, which provide a competitive  2  Assuming that the company owns  contractors’ work product  advantage by virtue of their confidentiality. · Trademarks and service marks, which  identify the sources of goods and services.  In an effort to control costs, some companies  minimize the number of employees and  engage independent contractors for product  development and other tasks.  5 Filing for a provisional patent before  the scope of the invention is clear  Many companies like provisional patents  However, unless it has a properly­drafted  because they are inexpensive and allow the  agreement in place with the contractor, the  company to hold a filing date – and delay  company likely will find that it has even fewer  paying for a non­provisional patent – while  rights to the contractor’s work product than it  raising funds and confirming that the  has in the employee situation described above!  invention is commercially viable.  A prudent company will make sure that each  However, the provisional filing date is  contractor’s agreement gives the company all  valuable only to the extent that claims in the  rights to work product; requires the contractor  issued patent are supported by disclosure in  to help perfect those rights; specifies  the provisional patent. If you file for the  confidentiality obligations; and requires that  provisional before the scope of your invention  the contractor indemnify the company against  is clear, you may find that the provisional was  third­party IP infringement claims.  a waste of time and money. 
  2. 2. 6  Treating the federal government like  non­governmental infringers  gives users the right to modify and redistribute  source code – has skyrocketed. As a result,  many software developers are trying to figure  While a fundamental tenet of patent and  out how to incorporate open source software  copyright law is that a patent or copyright  into their business models.  owner can enjoin infringement by other  parties, there is a major loophole when the  Because open source software often is  other party is the United States.  provided at no charge, some developers think  that they can do with it whatever they want –  Under its eminent domain power, the U.S. can  perhaps not recognizing that by incorporating  take private property for public use – but, as  open source into a company’s product, under  required by the Fifth Amendment to the U.S.  the applicable license they may have made the  Constitution, only if just compensation is paid.  company’s product open source, too!  So if the government wants to use an  invention that would infringe your patent, you  Accordingly, any company that is developing  cannot obtain an injunction to stop that use.  software needs to keep tight controls on  Instead, you need to file a claim for payment  whether, when and how open source is used.  with the appropriate government department.  If you cannot reach a suitable agreement with  that department, your only recourse will be to  9  Giving the “family jewels” to an  overseas supplier  bring suit in the Court of Federal Claims in  Many technology companies use outsourced,  Washington, D.C.  and in some cases “offshored,” services as a  way to save money – but these companies  7  Neglecting to identify and protect trade  secrets  need to know about the risks of putting IP in  the hands of overseas suppliers.  One of the best examples of a trade secret is  For example, China is notorious for not  the formula for Coca Cola. By revealing that  respecting IP rights. And while India’s IP laws  formula to only a small number of people and  are well within the mainstream, a lawsuit to  requiring that they keep that formula in  enforce those rights might last five or ten  confidence, the company has maintained a  years before any remedy is available.  legally­enforceable competitive advantage  since 1886.  As a result, the most prudent approach is to  send overseas only IP that your company can  All companies need to: afford to have stolen. If you need an outsource  · Identify company information that  supplier to create or use your “family jewels,”  constitutes trade secrets. choose a domestic supplier.  · Ensure that the information is recorded, filed  away and secured against unauthorized  access. 10 Registering the wrong entity as the  owner of IP  · Enter into appropriate confidentiality  More than once, I have seen companies file  agreements with all employees and third  their own trademark or copyright registrations  parties who will have access to those trade  and make a mistake in identifying the owner.  secrets.  If you are a sole proprietor, use your name  rather than a fictitious business name. If you  8  Believing that “open source” means  “no restrictions”  have established a separate legal entity, use its  correct name. If you are not sure about that  During the past several years, commercial  name, ask your lawyer or go to the appropriate  acceptance of open source software – which  Secretary of State website.  Any company that can avoid these traps will go a long way toward establishing a solid IP foundation for future  business success.  Dana Shultz (www.danashultz.com) provides high­touch legal services to high­tech companies and publishes  the High­touch Legal Services Blog (danashultz.com/blog). He can be reached at 510­547­0545 or  dana@danashultz.com.  The information in this article is not intended as legal advice. If you need legal advice on a matter, please  contact an attorney directly. 

×