Review Common Money Mistakes
Most people try to avoid making major mistakes when it comes to
managing their money. But we’re all human, and even the mo...
Cashing out your 401K
When leaving a job where you contributed to a 401(k) retirement plan, you’ll have a few options: You...
Not contributing in tough times
It can be human nature to not want to invest money when the financial markets — and your a...
“Lifestyle Inflation”
This is the term some financial experts have coined to describe what happens when an individual’s
li...
Paying bills late and bouncing checks
Many people who pay bills late do so simply because they forgot, not because they di...
Carrying a credit card balance
A common misconception is that carrying a balance on your credit card will help improve you...
Material contained in this article is provided for information purposes only and is
not intended to be used in connection ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

David Lerner Associates: Review of Common Money Mistakes

13,475 views

Published on

Most people try to avoid making major mistakes when it comes to managing their money. But we’re all human, and even the most savvy money managers and budgeters aren’t immune from making a few money management blunders.In this review we examine five common personal financial and money management mistakes.

Published in: Economy & Finance, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
13,475
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
175
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

David Lerner Associates: Review of Common Money Mistakes

  1. 1. Review Common Money Mistakes
  2. 2. Most people try to avoid making major mistakes when it comes to managing their money. But we’re all human, and even the most savvy money managers and budgeters aren’t immune from making a few money management blunders. These 5 are common mistakes. .
  3. 3. Cashing out your 401K When leaving a job where you contributed to a 401(k) retirement plan, you’ll have a few options: You can leave the money in the former employer’s plan, roll it over into an IRA, or cash it out. The latter is usually the least-wise option from a financial perspective because taxes will be assessed at your current ordinary income tax rate and you could also be subject to a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty if you’re under age 59½.
  4. 4. Not contributing in tough times It can be human nature to not want to invest money when the financial markets — and your account balance — go down. But this may actually be the best time to invest, because lower financial markets may mean lower asset prices. Remember the old investing adage: “Buy low, sell high.”
  5. 5. “Lifestyle Inflation” This is the term some financial experts have coined to describe what happens when an individual’s lifestyle rises commensurate with his or her income. So if you experience a 10 percent increase in your income, congratulations! But resist the urge to immediately increase your expenses by 10 percent. Go ahead and splurge on something nice if you like, but strive to save as much of the extra income as you can, instead of moving into a more expensive home or buying an expensive new car.
  6. 6. Paying bills late and bouncing checks Many people who pay bills late do so simply because they forgot, not because they didn’t have the money. To avoid this mistake, consider signing up for your bank’s online bill pay service, or for autodrafts or online payments that are available from most utilities and credit card companies. Your bank may also offer an overdraft protection service that automatically transfers money from a savings account to cover checking account overdrafts. There may be a small fee for this transfer, but it’s usually much less than the fee charged for an overdraft.
  7. 7. Carrying a credit card balance A common misconception is that carrying a balance on your credit card will help improve your credit score. This generally isn’t true — in fact, it may even hurt your score. Worse yet, you will likely pay a high interest rate on credit card balances. Some financial experts recommend paying your credit card balances in full each month, if possible, even if you have to take money out of savings to do it.
  8. 8. Material contained in this article is provided for information purposes only and is not intended to be used in connection with the evaluation of any investments offered by David Lerner Associates, Inc. (DLA). This material does not constitute an offer or recommendation to buy or sell securities and should not be considering in connection with the purchase or sale of securities. Member FINRA & SIPC. Read the full article at http://news.davidlerner.com/news.php?include=144555

×