David Lerner Associates: ATM Scam Protection Tips

  • 3,622 views
Uploaded on

Tips from David Lerner Associates to help protect against the ATM Skimming Scam

Tips from David Lerner Associates to help protect against the ATM Skimming Scam

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,622
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ATM Scam Protection Tips
  • 2. A New ATM Scam Using Automated Teller Machines has become commonplace among Americans today. But many people aren’t aware of an ATM scam that could end up costing them big-time. It’s called ATM Skimming.
  • 3. Thieves install a device called an ATM skimmer on top of the card reader on a legitimate ATM, which records the information on debit and credit cards’ magnetic stripes. They also install a tiny pinhole camera somewhere on the ATM — for example, on a disguised pamphlet holder — which records PINs as they are entered by unsuspecting victims.
  • 4. ATM Skimming Devices Most ATM skimmers fit neatly over the top of the card reader and are designed to match the look of the ATM itself, making them almost undetectable at a quick glance or to an ATM user who is not familiar with them.
  • 5. Shield Your PIN Use your other hand to shield your fingers while you type in your PIN. Experts say taking this one simple step could practically eliminate ATM skimming. This is because if the hidden camera can’t capture your PIN, the mag stripe data captured by the skimmer is useless to the thief.
  • 6. Check the ATM Examine an ATM carefully before inserting your card. While skimmers may be hard for the untrained eye to spot, they actually become pretty obvious if you’re on the lookout for them. They usually consist of an extra piece of plastic that sits atop the slot where you insert your ATM card. They’re usually attached to the ATM using two-sided tape, so if it looks suspicious, jiggle it a little — if it’s loose, it might be a skimmer.
  • 7. Avoid Low Traffic Areas Don’t use ATMs in secluded, low-traffic areas. It takes a few minutes for thieves to install skimmers, so they usually choose ATMs in more secluded areas with less foot traffic so they’re less likely to be seen. If possible, try to only use ATMs in high-traffic areas like grocery stores, the mall or outside the bank itself.
  • 8. Material contained in this article is provided for information purposes only and is not intended to be used in connection with the evaluation of any investments offered by David Lerner Associates, Inc. (DLA). This material does not constitute an offer or recommendation to buy or sell securities and should not be considering in connection with the purchase or sale of securities. Member FINRA & SIPC. Read the full article at http://news.davidlerner.com/news.php?include=144563