Moodle, BIM, reflective journals and TPACK: Suggestions for moving beyond
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Moodle, BIM, reflective journals and TPACK: Suggestions for moving beyond

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Slides for a presentation at Moodlemoot'AU 2013 - http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/moodle-bim-reflective-journals-and-tpack-suggestions-for-moving-beyond/ ...

Slides for a presentation at Moodlemoot'AU 2013 - http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/2013/05/12/moodle-bim-reflective-journals-and-tpack-suggestions-for-moving-beyond/

Attempts to show how aspects of BIM development identify problems with institutional e-learning within universities and suggest some ways to move beyond.

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  • Sorry, when I was originally thinking about this presentation earlier this year I was thinking it would be a gee whiz bang demo showing off all the new features of BIM 3.0, not to mention glowing reports of my usage of BIM in my own teaching this last semester. But that was not to be.But I think my failure does offer some insights into what might be important for allowing Moodle to move beyond.
  • *** THE original Dougimas quote might go in here ****Here’s where the presentation overview might goPresent my argumentIllustrate this argument byTalking about what BIM does and how it got to be where it is nowTalking about how I’m planning to move BIM “beyond” and what form that might take.
  • It may also become a little critical. I’m that sort of guy. Looking for issues to fix. As much with my own practice as with that of others.
  • The Moodle quote – the aim behind this presentation is to share my thinking about how I’m going to try and help achieve an intention identify by a couple of blokes associated with some open source system.Thus, our pedagogical intention to enable teachers to develop the skills of transformative professionals capable of appreciating the need to complexify the culture of learning in their own educational institutions so that the interests and aspirations of all students are met. (Dougiamas & Taylor, 2003, p. 172)
  • Not only is the quality questionable, but there are suggestions that workload is overwhelming. A range of literature arising that questions workload from online learning. Lecturers who move into the online learning environment often discover that the workload involved not only changes, but can be overwhelming as they cope with using digital technologies. Questions arise, given the dissatisfaction of lecturers with lowering morale and increasing workload, whether future expansion of this teaching component in tertiary institutions is sustainable. Bright, S. (2012). eLearning lecturer workload: working smarter or working harder? In M. Brown, M. Hartnett, & T. Stewart (Eds.), ASCILITE’2012. Wellington, NZ.
  • I accept Mishra et al’s (2006, p. 1029) somewhat obvious quoteRedo the TPACK diagram with my own on a black backgroundQuality teaching requires developing a nuanced understanding of the complex relationships between technology, content, and pedagogy, and using this understanding to develop appropriate, context-specific strategies and representations. Productive technology integration in teaching needs to consider all three issues not in isolation, but rather within the complex relationships in the system defined by the three key elements.
  • My argument is that the e-learning at universities is so bad because it has bad TPACK. Worse the processes and systems that implement university e-learning aren’t doing a very good job at improving the level of TPACK. And not just the TPACK held by an individual academic, but the level of knowledge held by the institution and all its members.Give an example of “bad TPACK” and the problems that arise – casio calculator and its uses. Complex topic. Appropriate pedagogy. If you have bad TPACK – you’re going to get bad learning and teaching
  • My argument is that the e-learning at universities is so bad because it has bad TPACK. Worse the processes and systems that implement university e-learning aren’t doing a very good job at improving the level of TPACK. And not just the TPACK held by an individual academic, but the level of knowledge held by the institution and all its members.Give an example of “bad TPACK” and the problems that arise – casio calculator and its uses. Complex topic. Appropriate pedagogy. If you have bad TPACK – you’re going to get bad learning and teaching
  • My argument is that the e-learning at universities is so bad because it has bad TPACK. Worse the processes and systems that implement university e-learning aren’t doing a very good job at improving the level of TPACK. And not just the TPACK held by an individual academic, but the level of knowledge held by the institution and all its members.Give an example of “bad TPACK” and the problems that arise – casio calculator and its uses. Complex topic. Appropriate pedagogy. If you have bad TPACK – you’re going to get bad learning and teaching
  • Blame the teacher is often the knee jerk reaction. Every academic must have a formal qualification in learning and teaching. Following this logic I keep asking for Universities to make it a requirement that everyone person in a management person have a formal qualification in management. Of course, if this logic worked, then the highest quality e-learning would be found in Faculties of Education. Based on my experience this is not the case. Not to suggest that there isn’t fine e-learning going on in such faculties. But the same problems of islands of excellence, high workloads and a focus on the technology are just as prevalent.Formal qualifications in learning and teaching don’t work.
  • *** PERSONAL/SELFISH PERSPECTIVE/ASIDE ***I have formal qualifications in teaching. I have 20+ years experience with e-learning. I teach a course “ICTs and Pedagogy”. But I still have difficulty developing quality learning and teaching. My real focus is on being selfish. In helping make my task easier, because the systems I have to deal with aren’t good enough. So I’m trying to make some improvements to help me. But I think there is some potential in this for broader implications.
  • *** THE original Dougimas quote might go in here ****Here’s where the presentation overview might goPresent my argumentIllustrate this argument byTalking about what BIM does and how it got to be where it is nowTalking about how I’m planning to move BIM “beyond” and what form that might take.
  • Fractured TPACK image with Technology off to one side. *** could illustrate this over a sequence of slides with a description of each component accompanied by the next bit of the diagram(Jones and Luck, 2009)In 2006, I took over a course that was complex. 250+ students. 98% of them NESB. Six campuses, distance education and 13 different staff teaching the students. Three full-time.The content was Systems Development Overview. A Masters level course.10% of the mark was for an assessment portfolio. Students expected to keep a diary during the term and write responses to a series of question prompts. The diary was kept as a Word document.** Indicate the following as the outcomeRarely checked during term. Wouldn’t have been possible for distance education students. There is little meddling. The quality of the “reflection” was poor. Cases of academic misconduct. The average mark for the portfolio assessment was Fail.Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/publications/blog-aggregation-management-reducing-the-aggravation-of-managing-student-blogging/
  • Fractured TPACK image with Technology off to one side. *** could illustrate this over a sequence of slides with a description of each component accompanied by the next bit of the diagram(Jones and Luck, 2009)In 2006, I took over a course that was complex. 250+ students. 98% of them NESB. Six campuses, distance education and 13 different staff teaching the students. Three full-time.The content was Systems Development Overview. A Masters level course.10% of the mark was for an assessment portfolio. Students expected to keep a diary during the term and write responses to a series of question prompts. The diary was kept as a Word document.** Indicate the following as the outcomeRarely checked during term. Wouldn’t have been possible for distance education students. There is little meddling. The quality of the “reflection” was poor. Cases of academic misconduct. The average mark for the portfolio assessment was Fail.Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/publications/blog-aggregation-management-reducing-the-aggravation-of-managing-student-blogging/
  • Fractured TPACK image with Technology off to one side. *** could illustrate this over a sequence of slides with a description of each component accompanied by the next bit of the diagram(Jones and Luck, 2009)In 2006, I took over a course that was complex. 250+ students. 98% of them NESB. Six campuses, distance education and 13 different staff teaching the students. Three full-time.The content was Systems Development Overview. A Masters level course.10% of the mark was for an assessment portfolio. Students expected to keep a diary during the term and write responses to a series of question prompts. The diary was kept as a Word document.** Indicate the following as the outcomeRarely checked during term. Wouldn’t have been possible for distance education students. There is little meddling. The quality of the “reflection” was poor. Cases of academic misconduct. The average mark for the portfolio assessment was Fail.Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/publications/blog-aggregation-management-reducing-the-aggravation-of-managing-student-blogging/
  • Rarely checked during term. Wouldn’t have been possible for distance education students. There is little meddling. The quality of the “reflection” was poor. Cases of academic misconduct. The average mark for the portfolio assessment was Fail.Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/publications/blog-aggregation-management-reducing-the-aggravation-of-managing-student-blogging/
  • Rarely checked during term. Wouldn’t have been possible for distance education students. There is little meddling. The quality of the “reflection” was poor. Cases of academic misconduct. The average mark for the portfolio assessment was Fail.Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/publications/blog-aggregation-management-reducing-the-aggravation-of-managing-student-blogging/
  • Now talk about my change. --- TPACKShow the same context element – perhaps even keep the same content and pedagogy. But add in an image of me. An established interest in student reflection (Jones, 2006) and the use of blogs. Had designed and developed the e-learning system which hosted this course. Now show the changed technology aspect BAM – can I find images of BAM work.
  • Fractured TPACK image with Technology off to one side. *** could illustrate this over a sequence of slides with a description of each component accompanied by the next bit of the diagram(Jones and Luck, 2009)In 2006, I took over a course that was complex. 250+ students. 98% of them NESB. Six campuses, distance education and 13 different staff teaching the students. Three full-time.The content was Systems Development Overview. A Masters level course.10% of the mark was for an assessment portfolio. Students expected to keep a diary during the term and write responses to a series of question prompts. The diary was kept as a Word document.** Indicate the following as the outcomeRarely checked during term. Wouldn’t have been possible for distance education students. There is little meddling. The quality of the “reflection” was poor. Cases of academic misconduct. The average mark for the portfolio assessment was Fail.Jones, D., & Luck, J. (2009). Blog Aggregation Management: Reducing the Aggravation of Managing Student Blogging. In G. Siemns & C. Fulford (Eds.), World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009 (pp. 398–406). Chesapeake, VA: AACE. http://davidtjones.wordpress.com/publications/blog-aggregation-management-reducing-the-aggravation-of-managing-student-blogging/
  • So what happened.Important – it wasn’t just the introduction of the technology. The questions asked were also changed for pedagogical reasons. The marking scheme was also changed. ** Show this in the TPACK diagram.And the outcome from Jones and Luck (2009)encourage regular reflection by students;Most posts met the marking criteria “meets standard response”. *** can I give figures **enable staff to be aware of and response to student reflection;Only a few staff used the awareness of student progress to take action, more discussion below.implement some strategies to reduce the level of plagiarism in the course; andThere was some reduction in plagiarism for the report assignment, however, there was also some plagiarism of blog posts, discussed below.minimise any increase in workload for academic staff.While the systems helped reduce workload, the assignment design still required additional work from staff and this appeared to be a major problem.Mention the attempt to change the marking contracts??Maybe these quotes from Jones and Luck could be useful.Students tend to fall off the wagon…the major reason why the blog was created. So that we can keep track of students working week by week rather than…working the night before the assignment is due…in that respect it seems to have worked well.A similar comment reported that monitoring blog posts led to “more students cross[ed] that line of a fail into pass”. All nine of these students achieved similar high results on the blog assignment. Of the six students who did not register a blog, four failed every course they were studying that term. The remaining two students failed two of the three courses they were studying. 93 students scored less than 28% for their blog posts. Of those students: 31% achieved an overall result of less than 74%, almost 11% did not sit the final exam, and almost 57% sat the exam but failed the course.Some students were also positive about the blog assignment, especially those who received feedback.I studied my undergrad externally at CQU and have to say this was the most structured and supportive course I have taken. This is the first time I experienced an assessment item like this blog. It is a great way to encourage and motivate learning of the key concepts.
  • So what happened.Important – it wasn’t just the introduction of the technology. The questions asked were also changed for pedagogical reasons. The marking scheme was also changed. ** Show this in the TPACK diagram.And the outcome from Jones and Luck (2009)encourage regular reflection by students;Most posts met the marking criteria “meets standard response”. *** can I give figures **enable staff to be aware of and response to student reflection;Only a few staff used the awareness of student progress to take action, more discussion below.implement some strategies to reduce the level of plagiarism in the course; andThere was some reduction in plagiarism for the report assignment, however, there was also some plagiarism of blog posts, discussed below.minimise any increase in workload for academic staff.While the systems helped reduce workload, the assignment design still required additional work from staff and this appeared to be a major problem.Mention the attempt to change the marking contracts??Maybe these quotes from Jones and Luck could be useful.Students tend to fall off the wagon…the major reason why the blog was created. So that we can keep track of students working week by week rather than…working the night before the assignment is due…in that respect it seems to have worked well.A similar comment reported that monitoring blog posts led to “more students cross[ed] that line of a fail into pass”. All nine of these students achieved similar high results on the blog assignment. Of the six students who did not register a blog, four failed every course they were studying that term. The remaining two students failed two of the three courses they were studying. 93 students scored less than 28% for their blog posts. Of those students: 31% achieved an overall result of less than 74%, almost 11% did not sit the final exam, and almost 57% sat the exam but failed the course.Some students were also positive about the blog assignment, especially those who received feedback.I studied my undergrad externally at CQU and have to say this was the most structured and supportive course I have taken. This is the first time I experienced an assessment item like this blog. It is a great way to encourage and motivate learning of the key concepts.
  • So what happened.Important – it wasn’t just the introduction of the technology. The questions asked were also changed for pedagogical reasons. The marking scheme was also changed. ** Show this in the TPACK diagram.And the outcome from Jones and Luck (2009)encourage regular reflection by students;Most posts met the marking criteria “meets standard response”. *** can I give figures **enable staff to be aware of and response to student reflection;Only a few staff used the awareness of student progress to take action, more discussion below.implement some strategies to reduce the level of plagiarism in the course; andThere was some reduction in plagiarism for the report assignment, however, there was also some plagiarism of blog posts, discussed below.minimise any increase in workload for academic staff.While the systems helped reduce workload, the assignment design still required additional work from staff and this appeared to be a major problem.Mention the attempt to change the marking contracts??Maybe these quotes from Jones and Luck could be useful.Students tend to fall off the wagon…the major reason why the blog was created. So that we can keep track of students working week by week rather than…working the night before the assignment is due…in that respect it seems to have worked well.A similar comment reported that monitoring blog posts led to “more students cross[ed] that line of a fail into pass”. All nine of these students achieved similar high results on the blog assignment. Of the six students who did not register a blog, four failed every course they were studying that term. The remaining two students failed two of the three courses they were studying. 93 students scored less than 28% for their blog posts. Of those students: 31% achieved an overall result of less than 74%, almost 11% did not sit the final exam, and almost 57% sat the exam but failed the course.Some students were also positive about the blog assignment, especially those who received feedback.I studied my undergrad externally at CQU and have to say this was the most structured and supportive course I have taken. This is the first time I experienced an assessment item like this blog. It is a great way to encourage and motivate learning of the key concepts.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • Talk briefly about how BAM worked. Make the point that the version of BIM you download now works the same.Students create a blog. Register it with BAMStudents own blog. Answer the questions on their blog.BAM mirrors the students posts.Provides management interface for teaching staff.Students can check progress.
  • The creation of BIM – BAM Into Moodle – BIMBy July 2009 I was in central L&T at an institution that hadn’t figured out whether it wanted me or to what purpose to employ what skills I had. The institution had also made the decision to migrate to Moodle. BAM’s death knell. Moodle 1.9 didn’t provide something that works like BIM.Illustrate this with a TPACK diagram – remove the TECHNOLOGY circle. i.e. in moving to Moodle (and for other reasons) IT were planning to remove a range of other technologies and replace them with MoodleAnd then bring back in a technology in the form of Moodle and …Including the technology on which BAM was based. Leaving staff with “bad TPACK”. There were common suggestions here – could the students use a Moodle Wiki?As it happened, I was still employed at the institution and they didn’t know what to do with the role. First agreed upon project was development of BIM.MoodleAM (MAM) was an early possible name.
  • The creation of BIM – BAM Into Moodle – BIMBy July 2009 I was in central L&T at an institution that hadn’t figured out whether it wanted me or to what purpose to employ what skills I had. The institution had also made the decision to migrate to Moodle. BAM’s death knell. Moodle 1.9 didn’t provide something that works like BIM.Illustrate this with a TPACK diagram – remove the TECHNOLOGY circle. i.e. in moving to Moodle (and for other reasons) IT were planning to remove a range of other technologies and replace them with MoodleAnd then bring back in a technology in the form of Moodle and …Including the technology on which BAM was based. Leaving staff with “bad TPACK”. There were common suggestions here – could the students use a Moodle Wiki?As it happened, I was still employed at the institution and they didn’t know what to do with the role. First agreed upon project was development of BIM.MoodleAM (MAM) was an early possible name.
  • The creation of BIM – BAM Into Moodle – BIMBy July 2009 I was in central L&T at an institution that hadn’t figured out whether it wanted me or to what purpose to employ what skills I had. The institution had also made the decision to migrate to Moodle. BAM’s death knell. Moodle 1.9 didn’t provide something that works like BIM.Illustrate this with a TPACK diagram – remove the TECHNOLOGY circle. i.e. in moving to Moodle (and for other reasons) IT were planning to remove a range of other technologies and replace them with MoodleAnd then bring back in a technology in the form of Moodle and …Including the technology on which BAM was based. Leaving staff with “bad TPACK”. There were common suggestions here – could the students use a Moodle Wiki?As it happened, I was still employed at the institution and they didn’t know what to do with the role. First agreed upon project was development of BIM.MoodleAM (MAM) was an early possible name.
  • Then Moodle 2.x was released and the institutions were moving to that. I didn’t have the time to do the portingBroken TPACK again, chances are those pedagogical approaches disappeared.
  • The creation of BIM – BAM Into Moodle – BIMBy July 2009 I was in central L&T at an institution that hadn’t figured out whether it wanted me or to what purpose to employ what skills I had. The institution had also made the decision to migrate to Moodle. BAM’s death knell. Moodle 1.9 didn’t provide something that works like BIM.Illustrate this with a TPACK diagram – remove the TECHNOLOGY circle. i.e. in moving to Moodle (and for other reasons) IT were planning to remove a range of other technologies and replace them with MoodleAnd then bring back in a technology in the form of Moodle and …Including the technology on which BAM was based. Leaving staff with “bad TPACK”. There were common suggestions here – could the students use a Moodle Wiki?As it happened, I was still employed at the institution and they didn’t know what to do with the role. First agreed upon project was development of BIM.MoodleAM (MAM) was an early possible name.
  • Moving beyond
  • BIM released and open
  • BIM is not installed in the USQ Moodle installation.**** WHEN was BIM approved ******
  • But a quick check of the 2012 course specifications revealed significant use of reflective journals
  • At this stage I could have been happy to be swamped by the iteration inertia boat. As embodied in a question from Mark Dreschler in yesterday’s Moodle HQ Q&A session, once something becomes quite large it starts to suffer from inertia. Resistance to change in its state of motion or rest. While Moodle has this, there is also the same within institutions as they struggle to keep up with the inertia that comes from keeping up with different versions of Moodle (and other tools).Which causes all sorts of problems including the “technology dip”.
  • On the other hand, I’m much more of a bottom up type of guy.Engage in messy reality and tinker when and how I can.Cioborra (??) Indeed, activities such as hacking, improvising, tinkering, applying patches and cutting corners seem to punctuate ubiquitously the everyday life of systemsCioborra again – talking about the history of Strategic Information Systems -- most strategic applications have merged out of plain hacking. The capacity to integrate unique ideas and practical design solutions at the end-user level turns out to be more important than the adoption of structured approaches to systems development or industry analysis.The power of bricolage, improvisation and hacking is that these activities are highly situated; they exploit, in full, the local context and resources at hand, while often pre-planned ways of operating appear to be derooted, and less effective because they do not fit the contingencies of the moment.
  • On the other hand, I’m much more of a bottom up type of guy.Engage in messy reality and tinker when and how I can.Cioborra (??) Indeed, activities such as hacking, improvising, tinkering, applying patches and cutting corners seem to punctuate ubiquitously the everyday life of systemsCioborra again – talking about the history of Strategic Information Systems -- most strategic applications have merged out of plain hacking. The capacity to integrate unique ideas and practical design solutions at the end-user level turns out to be more important than the adoption of structured approaches to systems development or industry analysis.The power of bricolage, improvisation and hacking is that these activities are highly situated; they exploit, in full, the local context and resources at hand, while often pre-planned ways of operating appear to be derooted, and less effective because they do not fit the contingencies of the moment.
  • On the other hand, I’m much more of a bottom up type of guy.Engage in messy reality and tinker when and how I can.Cioborra (??) Indeed, activities such as hacking, improvising, tinkering, applying patches and cutting corners seem to punctuate ubiquitously the everyday life of systemsCioborra again – talking about the history of Strategic Information Systems -- most strategic applications have merged out of plain hacking. The capacity to integrate unique ideas and practical design solutions at the end-user level turns out to be more important than the adoption of structured approaches to systems development or industry analysis.The power of bricolage, improvisation and hacking is that these activities are highly situated; they exploit, in full, the local context and resources at hand, while often pre-planned ways of operating appear to be derooted, and less effective because they do not fit the contingencies of the moment.
  • ***** DESCRIBE THE PEDAGOGY HERE ********* INCLUDE SCREEN SHOTS?? ***
  • The Moodle quote – the aim behind this presentation is to share my thinking about how I’m going to try and help achieve an intention identify by a couple of blokes associated with some open source system.Thus, our pedagogical intention to enable teachers to develop the skills of transformative professionals capable of appreciating the need to complexify the culture of learning in their own educational institutions so that the interests and aspirations of all students are met. (Dougiamas & Taylor, 2003, p. 172)
  • What I’d like to now do is outline the principles that will underpin how BIM is going to move forward and some ideas of what shape BIM might be in coming years. PrinciplesEmergent development ** ProcessWhat I need (or others of interest)Distributed cognition *** ProductOff load cognitionHelp learningTruex et al.(1999, p. 117) where“emergent” refers to the state of being in continual process, neverarriving but always in transition.
  • (Bell & Winn, 2000, p. 132-133) talk about Salomon (1995) identifying two broad classes of distributed cognitionSituations focused on off-loading an individual's cognitive burden onto designed systems – in this case the design may not help the learner internalize the important aspects of what's been off-loaded.Learning environments constructed to reciprocally scaffold students in specific cognitive practices – in this case it can and perhaps should help the learner internalize the important aspect
  • Talk about the scaffolding for students.
  • Talk about the scaffolding for students.
  • **** PLOTS OR SCRIPTS *****From Perrotta, C., & Evans, M. A. (2013). Instructional design or school politics? A discussion of “orchestration” in TEL research. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29(3), 260–269. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2729.2012.00494.xIn somecases, TEL environments were explicitly or implicitlybuilt to be ‘teacher proof’, so that a learner would beable to perform activities independently, while issuesassociated with the variability of teachers’ skills andlevels of competence could be reduced. A recentexample is the use of ‘scripts’, which were developedin the field of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) as a model of instruction to be internalized by the students through interaction with amachine and with other peers. A script is therefore apsychologically oriented instructional technique thattypically describes what to do and how to do it atdifferent stages of a collaborative process, forexample, expecting a student to state a hypothesis andthen prompting a peer to produce counter-evidence,thus helping both internalize an effective model forself-regulated scientific argumentation (Stegmann,Weinberger, & Fischer, 2007)

Moodle, BIM, reflective journals and TPACK: Suggestions for moving beyond Moodle, BIM, reflective journals and TPACK: Suggestions for moving beyond Presentation Transcript

  • Moodle, BIM, reflective journals andTPACK: Suggestionsfor moving beyondDavid Jones - @djplanerhttp://bit.ly/bimBeyond
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_ellis/1234582747/http://bit.ly/bimBeyond
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/arselectronicacenter/8695704856/The argument/world viewBIM: Origins and whatMoving beyond
  • http://bit.ly/bimBeyond
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidewalk_flying/3534131757/our pedagogical intention to enable teachers todevelop the skills of transformative professionalscapable of appreciating the need to complexifythe culture of learning in their own educationalinstitutions so that the interests and aspirationsof all students are met(Dougiamas & Taylor, 2003, p. 172)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/arselectronicacenter/8695704856/The argument/world viewBIM: Origins and whatMoving beyond
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/joseeivissa2012/8201332964/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/joseeivissa2012/8201332964/Lecturers who move into the online learning environmentoften discover that the workload involved not only changes,but can be overwhelming as they cope with using digitaltechnologies. Questions arise, given the dissatisfaction oflecturers with lowering morale and increasing workload,whether future expansion of this teaching component intertiary institutions is sustainable.(Bright, 2012)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/artolog/2519646167/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/artolog/2519646167/The TPACK Hole
  • Quality teaching requiresdeveloping a nuancedunderstanding of thecomplex relationships betweentechnology,content, andpedagogy,and using this …to developappropriate,context-specificstrategies and representations.(Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p. 1029)ContextsTechnologicalPedagogical ContentKnowledge(TPACK)TechnologicalContentKnowledge(TCK)PedagogicalContentKnowledgeContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)TechnologicalKnowledge(TK)TechnologicalPedagogicalKnowledge(TPK)Context
  • ContextsContentKnowledge(CK) Describe differencesbetween imaginative,informative andpersuasive texts
  • ContextsContentKnowledge(CK) Describe differencesbetween imaginative,informative andpersuasive textsPedagogicalKnowledge(PK)Compare &contrast
  • ContextsContentKnowledge(CK) Describe differencesbetween imaginative,informative andpersuasive textsPedagogicalKnowledge(PK)Compare &contrastTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)TI-99/4ACalculator
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/dherholz/528993812/ ContextsTechnologicalPedagogical ContentKnowledge(TPACK)TechnologicalContentKnowledge(TCK)PedagogicalContentKnowledgeContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)TechnologicalKnowledge(TK)TechnologicalPedagogicalKnowledge(TPK)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/loop_oh/5631953241/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/artolog/2519646167/The TPACK Holetheoretical understanding of pedagogy hasdeveloped beyond teacher knowledge asstatic and located in the individual(Loveless, 2011, p. 304)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/artolog/2519646167/The TPACK HoleThey now incorporate understandings of theconstruction of knowledge through distributedcognition, design, interaction, integration, context,complexity, dialogue, conversation, concepts andrelationships.(Loveless, 2011, p. 304)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/talatlas/2284113599/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/arselectronicacenter/8695704856/The argument/world viewBIM: Origins and whatMoving beyond
  • Context2006250+ Students98% NESB6 campuses + DE13 staff (3 full-time)
  • ContextSystems development overviewMasters level courseFirst course for manyContentKnowledge(CK)
  • Context10% assessmentIndividual portfolio/diaryQuestions as promptsContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/iamroco/6880096005/The learning journal group obtained significantlyhigher marks than the control group(McCrindle & Christensen, 1995, p. 184)Reflective learning journals are recognized as asignificant tool in promoting active learning(Thorpe, 2004, p. 327)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/4307189567/Reflective learning journals aredemanding and time-consumingfor both students and educators(Thorpe, 2004, p. 339)
  • ContextBefore 2006Word documentsSubmitted online @ endof termTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)
  • ContextBefore 2006Word documentsSubmitted online @ endof termTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)End of term fictionAvg mark = Fail30% < misconductNot at all formativeWorkload
  • Context15 years e-learningPrior use of blogsDesigner of e-learningsystemNeeded a new laptopNew Dean of Faculty
  • Context10% assessmentIndividual portfolio/diaryQuestions as promptsContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)
  • ContextBAMTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)
  • ContextBAMTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)More formativeBetter quality (but not great)Good indicatorWorkload issues
  • ContextBAMTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)I studied my undergrad externally at CQUand have to say this was the most structuredand supportive course I have taken. This is thefirst time I experienced an assessment item likethis blog. It is a great way to encourage andmotivate learning of the key concepts
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BlogAggregationManagement
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BlogAggregationManagementBAMIntoMoodle
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/Students create and registerblogs/feeds
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/They answer questions (or not)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BIM aggregates and mirrors the studentposts
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BIM “allocates” posts to questionsUnallocated Submitted
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BIM interfacesStudent Staff
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BIM shows students what it knows about their posts
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/BIM provides a management interface
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/shellysblogger/3706465710/
  • Better TPACK == Better Teaching- 26 offerings, 7 courses- 2790+ students- 20,000+ blog posts
  • ContextBAM – July 2009TechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)
  • ContextTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)BAM – July 2009
  • ContextTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)BAM Into Moodle
  • ContextTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)BAM Into MoodleI’ve been using BIM for the past year at theUniversity of Canberra and it has saved mehours and hours of work… I cannot go back tomarking Word documents ever again, butwithout BIM blogs become terribly difficult to manage…(de Percy, n.d.)
  • ContextTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)ContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)2010 - 2011
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/room317/3078569857/The argument/world viewBIM: Origins and whatMoving beyond
  • ContextContentKnowledge(CK)2012ICTs and Pedagogy3rd year PSTs300+3 campuses + DE
  • ContextContentKnowledge(CK)Structured reflection on theuse of ICT can also be apowerful technique indeveloping pedagogicunderstanding(Hammond et al., 2009, p. 60)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)Contradiction between howteachers asked to use ICTsand the way their ownteachers integrated technologyinto their classes (Sutton, 2011)(Hammond et al, 2009)
  • ContextContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)BIM 2.0 writtenTechnologicalKnowledge(TK)http://bit.ly/bimPlug
  • http://bit.ly/bimPlug
  • ContextContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)TechnologicalKnowledge(TK)USQ - 2013
  • ContextContentKnowledge(CK)PedagogicalKnowledge(PK)TechnologicalKnowledge(TK)2012 USQ courses20 – diary2 – learning journal10 – reflective journalAssessmentn/a to 50%
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/atoach/8549060851/All about the upgrade boat
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/9422878@N08/7788404750/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/9422878@N08/7788404750/The power of bricolage, improvisation and hacking isthat these activities are highly situated; they exploit,in full, the local context and resources at hand, whileoften pre-planned ways of operating appear to bederooted, and less effective because they do not fitthe contigencies of the moment.(Cioborra, 2002)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/9422878@N08/7788404750/The capacity to integrate unique ideas and practicaldesign solutions at the end-user level turns out to bemore important than the adoption of structuredapproaches to systems development or industry analysis.(Cioborra, 2002 )
  • ContextContentKnowledge(CK)Learning journalJudging reflection impactsreflection• Number of posts• Size of posts• Links• Links to other postsPedagogicalKnowledge(PK)(Moon, 2006)TechnologicalKnowledge(TK)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidewalk_flying/3534131757/our pedagogical intention to enable teachers todevelop the skills of transformative professionalscapable of appreciating the need to complexifythe culture of learning in their own educationalinstitutions so that the interests and aspirationsof all students are met(Dougiamas & Taylor, 2003, p. 172)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/room317/3078569857/Process == BricolageProduct == ??
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/zegoggles/5622973488/2 broad classes of distributed cognition1. Off-loading cognitive burden onto designed system2. Scaffolding action & learning(Bell & Winn, 2000, p. 132-133)
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/russellede/5079130059/Offloading for studentsCheck valid URL – check for feedChecking for summary feedsBetter awareness of progress
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinthepit/8784176706/Scaffolding for studentsRecommendations for relevant postsScaffolding reflection and writing
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/spinthepit/8784176706/
  • Offload ScaffoldStudents
  • Offload ScaffoldOffload Scaffold Staff
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/zegoggles/5622973488/Pedagogical plotsBreak the course and activity barrier(Tribble, 2005)
  • Offload ScaffoldOffload ScaffoldOffload Scaffold Institutional
  • Offload ScaffoldOffload ScaffoldOffload ScaffoldOffload ScaffoldDeveloper
  • Quality Learningand TeachingTPACKBricolageCognitiveTools
  • http://flickr.com/photos/tantek/22778226/http://bit.ly/bimBeyondhttp://bit.ly/bimPlug
  • Bell, P., & Winn, W. (2000). Distributed Cognitions, by Natureand by Design. In D. Jonassen & S. Land (Eds.), TheoreticalFoundations of Learning Environments (pp. 123–145).Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Bright, S. (2012). eLearning lecturer workload: workingsmarter or working harder? In M. Brown, M. Hartnett, & T.Stewart (Eds.), ASCILITE’2012. Wellington, NZ.Ciborra, C. (2002). The Labyrinths of Information: Challengingthe Wisdom of Systems. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Dougiamas, M., & Taylor, P. (2003). Moodle: Using learningcommunities to create an open source course managementsystem. In D. Lassner & C. McNaught (Eds.), Worldconference on educational multimedia, … (pp. 171–178).Honolulu, Hawaii: AACE.Hammond, M., Fragkouli, E., Suandi, I., Crosson, S., Ingram, J., Johnston‐Wilder, P., Johnston‐Wilder, S., et al. (2009). Whathappens as student teachers who made very good use of ICTduring pre‐service training enter their first year of teaching?Teacher Development, 13(2), 93–106.doi:10.1080/13664530903043939Loveless, A. (2011). Technology, pedagogy and education:reflections on the accomplishment of what teachers know, doMcCrindle, A. R., & Christensen, C. a. (1995). The impact oflearning journals on metacognitive and cognitive processesand learning performance. Learning and Instruction, 5(2), 167–185. doi:10.1016/0959-4752(95)00010-ZMoon, J. (2006). Learning journals: A handbook for reflectivepractice and professional development (p. 200). Abingdon:RoutledgeMishra, P., & Koehler, M. (2006). Technological pedagogicalcontent knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge.Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1017–1054.Sutton, S. (2011). The Preservice Technology TrainingExperiences of Novice Teachers. Journal of Digital Learning inTeacher Education, 28(1), 39–48.Thorpe, K. (2004). Reflective learning journals : From conceptto practice. Reflective practice: International andMultidisciplinary Perspectives, 5(3), 327–343.Tribble, E. (2005). Distributing cognition in the globe.Shakespeare Quarterly, 56(2), 135–155.