Bergen CCS Conference Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Bergen CCS Conference Presentation

on

  • 2,850 views

Presentation given at the High Level Conference, Fighting Climate Change with Carbon Capture and Storage

Presentation given at the High Level Conference, Fighting Climate Change with Carbon Capture and Storage

May 2009

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,850
Views on SlideShare
2,548
Embed Views
302

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
43
Comments
0

5 Embeds 302

http://blogs.shell.com 286
http://theenergycollective.com 10
http://www.linkedin.com 4
http://www.slideshare.net 1
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Bergen CCS Conference Presentation Bergen CCS Conference Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Directions to 2050
    • Financing Carbon Capture and Storage Technology
      • General Guidelines
      • Action in the EU
      • An international approach
      • What it means in practice
      • CCS certification
    David Hone Group Climate Change Adviser Shell Future Fuels and CO 2
  • General Guidelines for CCS Support
    • Underlying price for CO 2 must be in place
    • Recognition of the demonstration nature of the technology
      • Clear demonstration objectives in place
      • A timeline for action
      • Funding commensurate with the task at hand
      • A focus on delivery of fewer complete projects, rather than limited funding for many.
    • A robust approach to CO 2 storage certification (and MRV) based on 2006 IPCC GHG Inventory Guidelines.
  • General Guidelines for CCS Support EU-ETS recognises CCS Demonstration programme announced in 2007 Funding available through to 2015 300 million EUA (~ €6-9 billion) 10-12 projects only EU CCS Directive Now in place in the EU ( on the way in the USA & Australia )
    • Underlying price for CO 2 must be in place
    • Recognition of the demonstration nature of the technology
      • Clear demonstration objectives in place
      • A timeline for action
      • Funding commensurate with the task at hand
      • A focus on delivery of fewer complete projects, rather than limited funding for many.
    • A robust approach to CO 2 storage certification (and MRV) based on 2006 IPCC GHG Inventory Guidelines.
  • Replicating the model internationally
    • Create a “ sector-based ” mechanism
    • within the Copenhagen Agreement
    • Large scale preparatory step towards absolute targets in developing countries
    • Clear purpose and end-point
    • Built on the foundation elements of the international agreement (e.g. mechanisms, MRV)
    • Negotiated separately (by a limited number of parties) as “satellites” to the main agreement
    • Typically focussed on a sector
    • Technology capacity building, funding and financing
    • Best practice capacity building
  • Example: A “ sector based ” agreement that accelerates CCS deployment Funding flow CCS Certs. 2009 2010-2015 2020 2025+ Objective: Establish CCS in three major developing countries through a 25 project programme Emissions trading adopted in key developing country power sectors Initial CCS roll-out in developing countries First large scale CCS demo projects (e.g. China) Initial CCS infrastructure funded directly Clean technology funding framework emerges globally CCS Project Mechanism & certification processes finalised $ £ ¥ €
    • EU-ETS
    • US-ETS
  • Evolution of the CDM and CCS Certification
    • CDM / JI (Kyoto 2008-2012)
    • Small / Moderate scale
    • Development “dividend”
    • SD criteria
    • Additionality
    • Exhaustive project by project process
    Cost of abatement € /tCO 2 e Abatement GtCO 2 e per year in 2030
    • CO 2 Storage Certificate
    • Recognises CCS globally
    • Certifies tonnes sequestered
    • Standardised rules
    • Potentially tradable
    • Clean Development Mechanism
    • Existing CDM rolls forward
    • Smaller scale than CTM
    • Development agenda
    • Focus on less developed economies
    • Clean Technology Mechanism
    • Focussed on the higher end of the
    • abatement curve
    • Principally clean electricity
    • Recognises CCS
    • Drives sector-based approach
  • CO 2 Storage Certificate
    • With an eye on the future:
    • Develop a [tradable] carbon sequestration unit (CSU) that is based on internationally accepted criteria for the longevity of storage.
      • Applies anywhere in the world
      • Awarded on the basis of ensuring long-term storage as per the 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Gas Inventories.
      • Could also support a CCS project in the CDM.
    • Best developed by a body dedicated to CCS, e.g. the Global CCS Institute (Australian), IPAC (Canadian) or Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF).
    • Underpins the necessary development of institutional capacity building for CCS measurement, reporting and verification.
    • Opens up the possibility of a range of policy options for the expanded deployment of CCS.
  • http://blogs.shell.com/climatechange