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Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
Sfa Child Protection  11th May 2008
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Sfa Child Protection 11th May 2008

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SFA Child Protection …

SFA Child Protection
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12 October 2008

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  • PROGRAMME Aims, National & Local Context Tutor What Are Your Issues? Group Exercise Extensions of Definitions of Abuse Tutor Update on Legislation Case studies – Thresholds Group Exercise Feedback Procedures & Recording Tutor LUNCH Case Studies – Good Practice Group Exercise Feedback The Internet & New Technologies Tutor Questions & Close
  • Transcript

    • 1. CHILD PROTECTION UPDATE FOR CLUBS
    • 2. Housekeeping
    • 3. AIMS Have knowledge of the extensions to the definitions of abuse and have an understanding of the thresholds of child protection Be aware of the risks to young people posed by the Internet new technologies 5 4 Be aware of good practice in coaching and the SFA Code of Conduct Ensure a knowledge of new guidelines, procedures and legislation 2 3 1 Be aware of the National and local context of Child Protection and identify your issues
    • 4. What are your issues ?
    • 5. HEALTH WARNING !
    • 6. Remember most children lead happy, healthy lives free from abuse
    • 7. “ This was an avoidable child death” Susan O’Brien QC October 2003 - Caleb Ness “ fault at almost every level in every agency involved” Why Is This So Important? “ possibility of avoiding her death” Dr Jean Herbison March 2006 –Danielle Reid “ major single agency and multi-agency system failures ”
    • 8. THE NATIONAL CONTEXT
    • 9. THE NATIONAL CONTEXT IN SPORT
      • The CP G uidelines
      • The Accord
      • The Standards
      2006 Accord for the Protection of Children in Scottish Sport
    • 10. Accord for the Protection of Children in Scottish Sport
      • A framework for Scottish Governing bodies of sport to sign up to
      • After signing up, sports organisations have 12 month period to develop action plan for national sport and support to affiliated clubs/organisations
      • Action plans include minimum operating requirements as well as implementing action around People, Policies, Procedures & Practice, Participation and Partnerships
      • Future funding from sportscotland based on organisations and clubs meeting minimum operating requirements
    • 11. Recommendations
      • Recommended Minimum Operating Requirements for Clubs:
      • A Child Protection Policy which reflects national guidelines, adopted by the Management Committee of the club
      • A Code of Conduct for working with children and young people
      • A procedure for the recruitment and selection of those who work with children and young people, including access to Disclosure Scotland checks
      • A procedure for responding to concerns about the welfare or abuse of a child - within or out with sport
    • 12. Recommendations
      • Recommended Minimum Operating Requirements for Clubs:
      • 5. A Disciplinary Procedure for managing concerns and allegations of poor practice, misconduct and child abuse and includes provision for referrals to the Disqualified from Working with Children List
      • A procedure for reviewing the management of concerns about poor practice, misconduct and/ or child abuse.
      • A named contact for the co-ordination of child protection within the club (including a role description) who has attended recommended training
      • A variety of child protection training offered at appropriate levels for those working or volunteering with children and young people
    • 13. Where do you look for guidance? Your own Club Guidelines on Child Protection SFA Child Protection Policy and Procedures Creating a Safe Environment in Football for Children and Vulnerable Adults
    • 14. LEGISLATION
    • 15. Protection of Children and Prevention of Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2004
        • Makes ‘grooming’ an offence
        • I ntroduces a n Order (Risk of Sexual Harm Order) imposing restrictions on adults who display inappropriate sexual behaviour towards children even if they have not been convicted
    • 16.
          • S et up a List of people disqualified from working with children (DWCL)
          • Any individual working with children –paid or unpaid – must be referred to the List when they have harmed a child or put a child at risk of harm AND been dismissed or moved away from contact with children as a result
      Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003
    • 17. Bichard Inquiry 2004
      • Report of the Inquiry into the deaths of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman
      • Key Recommendations:
      • A new system for registering those who
      • work with children
      • Clear guidance on recording and sharing
      • of information
      • National IT intelligence system
    • 18. Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007
      • Key Features :
      • Greater consistency on decision unsuitability through the development of a Central Barring Unit to assess information
      • Reduction in administration and bureaucracy as information is continuously updated about current status and can be provided without the need for a further enhanced disclosure check whenever someone moves job
      • Continuous updating means that if someone who had a Disclosure Check becomes unsuitable their employer is notified
      • Controlled access to barred status for personal employers
    • 19.
          • The proposed scheme will be designed to provide a centralised, integrated and updated system to prevent unsuitable people from gaining access to vulnerable groups and to ensure that those who become unsuitable are not able to remain in the workforce
          • The implementation date and consultation process has not been completed but will not be enacted before the Summer 2009
      The Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007
    • 20. CATEGORIES, EXTENDED DEFINITIONS OF ABUSE & EXAMPLES IN SPORT
    • 21. CATEGORIES AND EXTENSIONS TO DEFINITIONS OF ABUSE NEGLECT EMOTIONAL ABUSE PHYSICAL SEXUAL
    • 22.
      • What is the most common type of abuse on the Child Protection Registers in Scotland?
      • From whom are children most at risk?
    • 23. What is the most common type of abuse on the CPR’S? NOTE: These statistics relate to categories children are registered under (All Scotland) (Glasgow 80% Neglect) 45% 27% 12% 16%
    • 24. From Whom Are Children Most At Risk ?
      • In nearly half of the children subject to a CPCC the primary known/suspected abuser was the mother (47.9%)
      • Fathers made up 21.8% and the parent’s co-habitee 5.7%
    • 25. Emotional Abuse
      • It may involve serious bullying
      • It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another
    • 26. Domestic Abuse - Size of the problem? Around 100,000 children in Scotland are affected by domestic abuse Scottish Executive – National Strategy to Address Domestic Abuse in Scotland 2003
    • 27. Neglect
      • Ensure adequate supervision
      • Ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment
      • Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse
    • 28. Parental Substance Misuse INCREASED RISK OF ABUSE AND NEGLECT Over 50% of all child protection cases involve parental substance misuse
    • 29. Children Affected?
      • 40 - 60,000 children in Scotland affected by their parents drug use
      • (Report by Scottish Drugs forum and NHS Scotland July 2007)
      • 80 -100,000 children in Scotland affected by their parents alcohol misuse
      • (Scottish Executive, 2002)
    • 30. Physical Abuse
      • Fabricated or Induced Illness Syndrome (FIIS) whereby a parent or carer feigns the symptoms of, or deliberately causes, the ill-health in a child.
    • 31. World Wide Web
      • Internet
      • Downloading or creating indecent images
      • Chatrooms
      • Grooming over the net.
      • Operation Ore
      • 7,000 UK subscribers to an Internet pornography site.
      • Latest research has found that in the UK 26 people EVERY MINUTE try to access internet child pornography sites!
    • 32. SOME CASES & PROCEDURES
    • 33. Group Task
      • In small groups discuss each case in order
      • Make a note of two key points
      • State the action you would take
    • 34. 1. You overhear one of your coaches saying to a boy with three lines on the left hand side of his face “I hope the other guy looks worse than you!”
    • 35. Responding to a Concern or Disclosure
      • Do not give a guarantee of confidentiality
      • Only ask enough questions to gain basic information
      • Listen carefully & sympathetically
      • Take the allegation seriously - do not show disbelief
    • 36. Responding to a Concern or Disclosure
      • Only ask enough questions to gain basic information
      • Take the allegation seriously
      • Support the child - do not investigate!
    • 37. Establishing Basic Facts
          • No Leading Questions
          • No Personal Information
      Definition of a Leading Question
          • Suggests the required answer
          • or
          • Is based on an assumption of facts
          • which have yet to be proven
    • 38. ESTABLISHING THE BASIC FACTS – THE ’W’ QUESTIONS
      • When? When did it happen? 
      • Did it happen last night? X
      • Where? Where did it happen? 
          • Did she come into your bedroom? X
      • Who? Who did it? 
      • Was it mummy/daddy? etc X
      • What? What happened? 
      • Did such and such happen? X
    • 39.
      • Parents are no longer able to
      • give a blow to the head,
      • shake a child
      • use an implement on their child
      Other ‘reasonable chastisement’ is still allowed. Case Law will determine what is ‘reasonable’ and how other parts of this Act will be interpreted. The Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003
    • 40. 2. You become aware of the following about a very talented ten year old boy in your squad: 1) He has been late for training three times in the last month. 2) Other boys in the squad do not want to socialise with him as he is ‘smelly’. 3) His mother arrives to collect him on a regular basis under the influence of drink or drugs.
    • 41.
      • Some parents who have a drug/alcohol habit still provide good enough parenting
      • In itself parental substance abuse is not necessarily abusive but it does increase the risk of all forms of abuse and neglect
      • Professionals working with the child should be aware of the situation and monitor it.
      • Often it is putting the jigsaw together!
      Parental Substance Abuse
    • 42. Substance Misuse - Impact on Children
      • Higher risk of emotional or physical neglect
      • Children may be exposed to and involved in drug-related activities/crime
      • Economical deprivation
      • Relationships between parent/child difficult
      • Inconsistent care
      • Ineffective supervision
      • Getting our Priorities Right
    • 43. When is Substance Abuse Problematic? ‘ Protecting Children Living in Families with Problem Substance Abuse Guidelines for Agencies in Edinburgh and The Lothians' Substance use in itself may not have a negative impact on a parent’s capacity. …It is when substance use adversely affects life-style, social behaviour and capacity to discharge their parental responsibilities that it becomes a matter for concern because it adversely affects the quality of care that their child receives and poses a risk to health and development .
    • 44. My Concern Remember: you only hold one piece of the puzzle, there WILL be many more
    • 45. My Concern Social Work Police Parents Doctor To see the BIG picture You need ALL the pieces of the jigsaw School
    • 46. 3. At the start of a training session, Callum, who is 9, appears very withdrawn. When you talk to him, he tells you that his parents are always arguing. Yesterday evening, he saw his father push his mother against a door and try to strangle her. He asks you not to tell anyone as he is very anxious and embarrassed about it.
    • 47. What is Domestic or Intimate Partner Abuse?
      • Any form of physical, sexual or emotional abuse which takes place within the context of a close relationship. In most cases, the relationships will be between partners (married, co-habiting or otherwise) or ex-partners.
      • (Department of Health 1997)
    • 48. Domestic Abuse or Intimate Partner Abuse
      • Extends to acts perpetrated by family members as well as intimate partners
      • Acts such as forced marriages and other so called ‘Honour crimes’ which can include abduction and homicide are now included
    • 49. Domestic Abuse – Impact
      • Children have been shown to be at risk of behavioural, emotional, physical, and distorted cognitive functioning which can result in emotional and behavioural disturbances
      • Children are witnesses to, and subjected to, domestic violence; there is a correlation between domestic abuse and the mental, physical and sexual abuse of children
    • 50. DOMESTIC ABUSE
      • In 90% of cases of domestic abuse, the victim is a woman and the perpetrator a man.
      • In 95% of cases, the abuse takes place in the family home
      • On average a woman will be assaulted by her partner or ex partner 35 times before reporting it to the police
      • In 90% of incidents involving violence, the children are in the same or the next room
    • 51. DOMESTIC ABUSE "People throw around statistics saying that up to 70 or 80% of children of batterers are also abused. That statistic is wrong. EVERY child who witnesses abuse is a victim of abuse. As an abused child, and then as an adult trying to recover, I was far more affected by witnessing the abuse of my mother than I was by the abuse directed towards me." (Carlita) Woman survivor quoted in ‘Hidden Hurt’
    • 52.  
    • 53. 4. You see two boys laughing over a mobile phone. When you look at it you see that there is a picture of one of the girls in your U-15 girls’ team. She is clearly drunk and in a state of undress.
    • 54. 4.
      • Three quarters of children own a mobile phone by the time they are 12
      • 1 in 5 children said they had received threatening text messages
      • Bullying by phone can have a devastating effect on children as they cannot escape from it
    • 55. 4.
      • 1 in 10 had had images taken with mobile phone cameras to intimidate or embarrass them
      • You need to establish the basic facts and consider whether you have a child protection issue
      • The child should be reassured and told to save the message and image
      • These could be illegal under the Telecommunication Act 1984 and the young person charged and the possibility of being placed on the sex offenders register
    • 56. 5. The coach of the U-12 team comes to you for advice as he has heard one of the boys boasting that he is in a sexual relationship with a 15 year old girl. The coach is fairly sure from the boy’s graphic description that this is true.
    • 57. 5.
      • Scottish law on sexual relationships is complex
      • Under 12 – statutory rape with a possibility of life imprisonment
      • Under 13 - illegal sexual activity with a possibility of life imprisonment
      • Over 13 but under 16 – illegal but with a lesser legal tariff
    • 58. Unlawful Sexual Activity
      • The age of the young people involved
      • Any imbalance of power
      • Overt aggression
      • Whether coercion or bribery is involved or such an allegation has been made
    • 59. Unlawful Sexual Activity
      • Whether substances have been used as a disinhibitor
      • Whether the young person’s own behaviour, because of substance misuse, places him/her at risk so that s/he is unable to give informed consent to any activity
      • Whether a young person is able to give informed consent (e.g. mental illness, learning disability etc)
    • 60. Unlawful Sexual Activity
      • If a professional has any concerns then they must refer to Social Work or Police for advice
      • It is vital that professionals reassure young people and attempt to empower them to participate effectively in their own welfare and protection. The professional must state clearly to the young person that they are referring the concern
      • Any decision taken (whether or not to report), reasons why the decision was made, and who was consulted in reaching this decision, should be recorded and kept in the young person’s file/notes
    • 61. 6. One of your team members tells you that that he is going to meet a guy in another part of Scotland he has been chatting to on ‘Bebo.’ He says this man has told him he has contacts with many English teams scouts and wants to meet him to see if he is skilled enough for him to get in touch with them to come and watch him play a full game.
    • 62. 6.
      • You would need to establish the basic facts
      • No reputable Scout would contact a player in this way
      • You may have a ‘Grooming’ offence
    • 63. PROCEDURES & RECORDING
    • 64. PROCEDURES REFER TO SOCIAL WORK OR POLICE DISCLOSURE BY CHILD OBSERVATION CONCERN/DISCLOSURE BY OTHER CHILD/ADULT/AGENCY RECORD & REPORT TO THE CLUB CHILD PROTECTION CO0RDINATOR or CLUB OFFICIAL ON THE DAY SCREEN ESTABLISH BASIC FACTS ASK ‘W’ QUESTIONS IF NECESSARY RECORD INFORMATION OF ALLEGED, SUSPECTED OR ACTUAL ABUSE
    • 65. PROCEDURES NO ACTION SINGLE AGENCY CHILD PROTECTION – CHILD PROTECTION CASE CONFERENCE, POLICE CHARGES, REFERRAL TO REPORTER ETC SCREEN INTER-AGENCY REFERRAL DISCUSSION (POLICE, HEALTH & SOCIAL WORK) DECIDES WHAT ACTION NEEDS TO BE TAKEN E.G.MEDICALS, WHO TELLS PARENTS AND WHEN, WHOSE CONSENT IS REQUIRED SCREEN
    • 66. Recording
      • As soon as possible and certainly on the same day
      • In handwriting
      • In the child’s own words
      • On the Child Protection Form
    • 67. GOOD PRACTICE
    • 68. 1. The father of one of your most promising team members says to him ‘Wait ‘til I get you home – you played like a right wee poof today’ He then turns to you and says ‘You agree, don’t you?’
    • 69. 1.
      • You cannot collude with what could be verbal bullying and a discriminatory remark
      • Your best course of action would be to speak to the parent and child separately
      • This should be recorded in case it is part of a pattern of emotional abuse
    • 70. 2. You see a young player teasing a coach about how badly his team is doing. The coach clips him round the ear in a joking way. The child runs away laughing.
    • 71. 2.
      • Whilst this might seem to be harmless and done without any feelings of malice or intent to abuse, it should not go unchallenged
      • Leaving this could lead to the coach repeating it with a child who does not treat it as a joke and reports it or in front of someone who misreads it and reports it as assault
      • This is situation where the coach needs to be reminded of the Code of Conduct as it applies to ‘horseplay’
    • 72. 3. Four weeks before a cup final your first choice goalkeeper is injured. His doctor recommends that he doesn’t play for six weeks but the week before the match, he tells you that he is fit and is desperate to play. .
    • 73. 3.
      • However keen the child is to play, it is your job to consider his long term health
      • Any decision to let him play would have to be agreed by the boy’s parents and his doctor
    • 74. 4. The highly talented captain of your team is looked up to by all the other players. Last year, at the end of the season when you caught him bullying, you stopped him playing for three games and this resulted in a big slump in form. He is back this year and the team are doing much better but you become aware that he is once again bullying some of the younger team members.
    • 75. 4.
      • This cannot be ignored
      • If, after investigation, the bullying allegation is confirmed, the bully and the bullies should be spoken to separately.
      • Parents should also be involved
      • As this is a continuing problem, serious action would need to be considered
    • 76. 5. A boy complains to you that he feels he can do no right and that, although he gets a start in every game, he is never praised but always criticised. He tells you that he scored a hat-trick in his last game but that all that was mentioned in the post match discussion was a small mistake he made.
    • 77. 5.
      • The SFA and sportscotland Guidelines both emphasise that people working with children and young people should:
      • Make sport fun, enjoyable
      • ‘ give enthusiastic and constructive feedback rather than negative criticism’
      • This needs to be investigated and, if found to be true, action taken
    • 78. THE INTERNET, SOCIAL NETWORKING AND NEW TECHNOLOGY
    • 79. Mobiles, Gaming, Social Networking, Chatting, Podcasts, Blogs, P2P TV
    • 80. HABBO HOTEL
    • 81. CHAT ROOM Hi! U sound cute. ASL? What r u doing l8r?
    • 82. 14/ male/Kelvinside Im into fitness & powerlifting U? CHAT ROOM
    • 83. Web Cam Dangers! Justin Berry
    • 84.  
    • 85. DANGERS!
      • Copying of photographs
      • Information on child’s profile can then be used to make grooming easier
      • Bullying
    • 86.
      • Any potentially abusive contact can be reported through using the ‘Report Abuse’ icon on sites such as Bebo
      Social networking/IM
    • 87. Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre
      • 25% of young people surveyed said that they had met up in the offline world someone with whom they had made initial contact online
      • Chatrooms/Instant Messaging are the most frequently reported online location of reported abuse – 65%
    • 88. WANT MORE INFORMATION? www.thinkuknow.co.uk
    • 89. ANY QUESTIONS?
    • 90. IF IN DOUBT CHECK IT OUT!!!
    • 91. And to end Is this animal protection?
    • 92.  
    • 93. Are you now aware of: The extensions to the definitions of abuse and the procedures to follow? The need to take advice and thresholds of child protection and the risks to young people posed by new technologies New guidelines and legislation? 2 3 4 1 Aware of the Local and National context of Child Protection?
    • 94.  
    • 95. KEEPING MYSELF SAFE - TEENAGERS
    • 96.
      • Safety at parties and nights out
      • Knife crime
      • Peer pressure and the use of drugs
      • Grooming
      • Using technology
      • Internet safety
      • Domestic violence
      • Teenage depression and suicide
      • Sexual abuse
      • Sexual assault

    ×