SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   How	  to	  maximize	  internaliza=on	  &	  externaliza=on	                             April	  1,	 ...
A	  phenomenon	  is	  any	  observable	  occurrence	  (from	  Greek:	  phainómenon	  “that	  which	  appears”).	          ...
General	  mo=ve	   In	  our	  age	  of	  informa=on,	  rhetoric	  has	  become	  redundant	  and	  can	  even	  get	  down...
We	  are	  not	  passive	  receivers	  of	  an	  independent	  reality.	           To	  be	  able	  to	  make	  sense	  of...
PHENOMENAL	  REALITY	  	                        Social	  	                                                                ...
PHENOMENAL	  REALITY	  	                        Social	  	                                                               P...
Our	  view	  of	  the	  world	  is	  a	  social	  construc=on.	  We	  adopt	  customs	  and	  beliefs	  from	  our	  socia...
PHENOMENAL	  REALITY	  	                        Social	  	                                                               P...
The	  processes	  of	  percep=on	  rou=nely	  alter	  what	  we	  see.	  	  	                  We	  constantly	  expose	  ...
Why	  are	  these	  processes	  so	  important?	  	                                              SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   10...
Internaliza=on	  creates	  trust	      Degree	  of	  trust	  in	  different	  forms	  of	  adver=sing	                     ...
Externaliza=on	  creates	  reach	                                  SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   12	  /	  58	  
How	  to	  maximize	  internaliza=on	  &	  externaliza=on?	  	                                                   SHAPING	 ...
PHENOMENAL	  REALITY	  	                        Social	  	                                                               P...
i1.	  CREATION	   The	  act	  of	  making,	  inven=ng	  or	  producing.	                                                  ...
Create	  something	  never	  seen	  before.	       Embrace	  new	  technologies.	  Create	  newness	  by	  mashing	  up	  ...
A	  culture	  of	  mul=tasking,	  on-­‐the-­‐go	  consump=on	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	        and	  24/7	  connec=vity,	  r...
Don’t	  talk	  about	  it,	  do	  it	  Help	  customers	  	  	                   Stop	  selling	  your	                   ...
Stop	  communica=ng	  products,	  start	  making	  communica=on	  products.	                     -­‐	  Gareth	  Kay	  -­‐	...
Conclusion	  Maximize	  internaliza=on	  by	  crea=ng	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  new	  tangible	  proj...
i2.	  SIGNIFICATION	     The	  act	  or	  process	  of	  giving	  meaning	  by	  using	  signs.	                          ...
A	  sign	  is	  an	  observable	  unit	  of	  meaning	  that	                     refers	  to	  an	  absent	  object.	  	 ...
Rela%on	  between	  sign	  &	  absent	  object	  Iconic	                         Rela=on	  based	  on	  resemblance	      ...
A	  sign	  acquires	  meaning	  in	  3	  stages:	      Firstness	  is	  how	  the	  image	  itself	  is	  perceived	  (affe...
Firstness	                                                           Secondness	  Thirdness	                              ...
Conclusion	     Maximize	  internaliza=on	  by	  using	  signs,	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  but	  allow	  people	  to	...
i3.	  NARRATION	     The	  telling	  of	  a	  story	  or	  of	  happenings.	                                              ...
Narra=ve	  organizes	  not	  just	  memory,	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  but	  the	  whole	  of	  human	...
Narra%ve	  structures	  Linear	                        Story	  wrioen	  in	  the	  same	  =me	  order	  as	  it	          ...
Marke=ng	  typically	  follows	  the	  Hollywood	  structure,	  	                aiming	  at	  comprehension.	   While	  i...
Conclusion	  Maximize	  internaliza=on	  by	  adop=ng	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	    non-­‐linear	  narra=ve	  st...
i4.	  DIFFERENTIATION	       The	  act	  of	  dis=nguishing	  by	  giving	  specific	  difference.	                         ...
Different	  aspects	  or	  quan==es	  of	  knowledge,	  possessions	  or	  culture	  can	  define	  our	  status	  and	     ...
Two	  Step	  Flow	  model	       -­‐	  Katz	  &	  Lazarsfeld,	  1955	  -­‐	                                               ...
People	  tend	  to	  have	  different	  roles	  within	  different	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	            ...
Conclusion	    Maximize	  internaliza=on	  by	  dis=nguishing	  between	  and	  adap=ng	  to	  different	  social	  roles.	...
PHENOMENAL	  REALITY	  	                        Social	  	                                                                ...
e5.	  SENSATION	  A	  percep=on	  associated	  with	  s=mula=on	  of	  a	  sense	  organ.	                                ...
Through	  the	  senses	  we	  experience	    	  reality	  and	  create	  memories.	                    -­‐	  Kevin	  Rober...
SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   40	  /	  58	  
The	  screen	  has	  replaced	  the	  scene.	  The	  virtual	  can	  be	  seen	  as	  a	  new	  dimension	  of	         hy...
Mobility	                                                                        Richness	  Max.	  1”	         Max.	  15”	...
Conclusion	  Maximize	  externaliza=on	  by	  designing	  for	       op=mal	  sensory	  s=mula=on.	  	                    ...
e6.	  PARTICIPATION	      The	  act	  of	  sharing	  in	  the	  ac=vi=es	  of	  a	  group.	                               ...
Tell	  me,	  and	  I	  forget	  it,	    Show	  me,	  and	  I	  remember,	  Let	  me	  do	  it,	  and	  I	  understand.	   ...
People	  need	  mo=va=on	  to	  get	  involved.	                                            SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   46	  /	...
Mo=va=on	                                                             Emo%onal	                                           ...
Conclusion	  Maximize	  externaliza=on	  by	  triggering	  emo=onal	  and/or	  ra=onal	  mo=va=ons.	  	                   ...
e7.	  INTERPRETATION	    A	  personal	  mental	  representa=on	  of	  the	  meaning	  of	  an	  observa=on.	              ...
Ambiguity	  allows	  for	  mul=ple	  interpreta=ons.	                                             SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   5...
SHAPING	  PHENOMENA	   51	  /	  58	  
Aesthe=c	  judgment	  is	  realized	  through	  spontaneous	  synchroniza=on	  	  	  	  	                    of	  imagina=...
-­‐	  Self-­‐portrait	  by	  Rembrandt	  van	  Rijn	  -­‐	     -­‐	  Self-­‐portrait	  by	  Francis	  Bacon	  -­‐	        ...
Eide=c	  features	  are	  the	  features	  that	  cannot	  be	  changed	  without	                 affec=ng	  the	  true	  ...
 Eide=c	  features	  of	  the	  Common	  brand	  are:	       a	  product/service	  with	  a	  sustainable	  nature,	  	  a...
Conclusion	  Maximize	  externaliza=on	  by	  nurturing	  different	  individual	  interpreta=ons,	  while	  staying	  true...
PHENOMENAL	  REALITY	  	                        Social	  	                                                                ...
How	  to	  maximize	  internaliza=on	  &	  externaliza=on	  1.  CREATION	  –	  	  Create	  new	  tangible	  projects	  and...
CASES	  
DAVID	  LYNCH	  1.  CREATION	  –	  original	  outstanding	  crea=ve	  expressions	  	  2.  SIGNIFICATION	  –	  use	  of	  ...
BANKSY	  1.  CREATION	  –	  signature	  street	  art	  full	  of	  mischief	  and	  mystery	  2.  SIGNIFICATION	  –	  repr...
MANIFESTO	  OBEY	  Giant	  is	  an	  experiment	  in	  phenomenology.	  Phenomenology	  aoempts	  to	  enable	  people	  t...
SHEPARD	  FAIREY	  1.  CREATION	  –	  image	  stays	  the	  same,	  context	  is	  ever-­‐changing	  2.  SIGNIFICATION	  –...
Arer	  turning	  the	  design	  of	  the	  boole	  into	  a	  popular	  icon,	  	  	   Absolut	  transported	  this	  conc...
…and	  quickly	  realized	  it	  would	  not	  be	  sufficient.	     Absolut	  needed	  to	  adapt	  to	  a	  changing	  wor...
ABSOLUT	  1.  CREATION	  –	  installa=ons,	  projects,	  products	  and	  pieces	  of	  art	  2.  SIGNIFICATION	  –	  the	...
THANKS!	              David	  Feenstra	             Strategic	  Planner	  hop://denieuwejuniorstrateeg.web-­‐log.nl	  
Shaping Phenomena
Shaping Phenomena
Shaping Phenomena
Shaping Phenomena
Shaping Phenomena
Shaping Phenomena
Shaping Phenomena
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Shaping Phenomena

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Why it is important that people talk about what you make and how you can trigger these conversations.

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Shaping Phenomena

  1. 1. SHAPING  PHENOMENA   How  to  maximize  internaliza=on  &  externaliza=on   April  1,  2011  
  2. 2. A  phenomenon  is  any  observable  occurrence  (from  Greek:  phainómenon  “that  which  appears”).   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   2  /  58  
  3. 3. General  mo=ve   In  our  age  of  informa=on,  rhetoric  has  become  redundant  and  can  even  get  downright  offensive.   We  need  to  move  from  messaging  to  meaning.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   3  /  58  
  4. 4. We  are  not  passive  receivers  of  an  independent  reality.   To  be  able  to  make  sense  of  a  complex  world,  we  form  mental  construc=ons  as  representa=ons  of  reality.   Individually  and  in  groups…   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   4  /  58  
  5. 5. PHENOMENAL  REALITY     Social     Percep2on   construc2on   Internaliza2on  SOCIAL  REALITY   INDIVIDUAL  REALITY   Externaliza2on   -­‐  Ref:  Giep  Franzen  &  Marieke  van  den  Berg  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   5  /  58  
  6. 6. PHENOMENAL  REALITY     Social     Percep2on   construc2on   Internaliza*on  SOCIAL  REALITY   INDIVIDUAL  REALITY   Externaliza2on   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   6  /  58  
  7. 7. Our  view  of  the  world  is  a  social  construc=on.  We  adopt  customs  and  beliefs  from  our  social  environment.   Through  internaliza=on  this  becomes  an  individual  reality.   Internaliza=on  is  the  process  of  acceptance  of  a  set  of  norms     established  by  people  or  groups  influen=al  to  the  individual.     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   7  /  58  
  8. 8. PHENOMENAL  REALITY     Social     Percep2on   construc2on   Internaliza2on  SOCIAL  REALITY   INDIVIDUAL  REALITY   Externaliza*on   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   8  /  58  
  9. 9. The  processes  of  percep=on  rou=nely  alter  what  we  see.       We  constantly  expose  our  individual  reality.  Through  externaliza=on  we  match  it  with  our  social  environment.   Externaliza=on  is  an  unconscious  defense  mechanism   where  an  individual  projects  his  own  internal  characteris=cs     onto  the  outside  world,  par=cularly  onto  other  people.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   9  /  58  
  10. 10. Why  are  these  processes  so  important?     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   10  /  58  
  11. 11. Internaliza=on  creates  trust   Degree  of  trust  in  different  forms  of  adver=sing   -­‐  The  Nielsen  Company  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   11  /  58  
  12. 12. Externaliza=on  creates  reach   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   12  /  58  
  13. 13. How  to  maximize  internaliza=on  &  externaliza=on?     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   13  /  58  
  14. 14. PHENOMENAL  REALITY     Social     Percep2on   construc2on   Internaliza*on  SOCIAL  REALITY   INDIVIDUAL  REALITY   Externaliza2on   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   14  /  58  
  15. 15. i1.  CREATION   The  act  of  making,  inven=ng  or  producing.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   15  /  58  
  16. 16. Create  something  never  seen  before.   Embrace  new  technologies.  Create  newness  by  mashing  up  culture.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   16  /  58  
  17. 17. A  culture  of  mul=tasking,  on-­‐the-­‐go  consump=on                   and  24/7  connec=vity,  requires  designs  for       con=nuous  development  and  change.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   17  /  58  
  18. 18. Don’t  talk  about  it,  do  it  Help  customers       Stop  selling  your   Fund  sustainability  ideas  drive  efficiently     product  for  a  day   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   18  /  58  
  19. 19. Stop  communica=ng  products,  start  making  communica=on  products.   -­‐  Gareth  Kay  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   19  /  58  
  20. 20. Conclusion  Maximize  internaliza=on  by  crea=ng                                new  tangible  projects  and  products.     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   20  /  58  
  21. 21. i2.  SIGNIFICATION   The  act  or  process  of  giving  meaning  by  using  signs.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   21  /  58  
  22. 22. A  sign  is  an  observable  unit  of  meaning  that   refers  to  an  absent  object.     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   22  /  58  
  23. 23. Rela%on  between  sign  &  absent  object  Iconic   Rela=on  based  on  resemblance   Photos,  typography,                                                 pictograms  Indexical   Rela=on  based  on  experience   Indica=ons,  names,   symptoms  Symbolic   Rela=on  based  on  agreement   Words,  badges,  logos   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   23  /  58  
  24. 24. A  sign  acquires  meaning  in  3  stages:   Firstness  is  how  the  image  itself  is  perceived  (affec=on).     Meaning  can  s=ll  develop  in  any  direc=on.    Secondness  is  no  longer  about  affec=on,  but  understanding  of   the  context  of  the  image.  Meanings  are  not  yet  fixed.     In  Thirdness  the  meanings  of  signs  are  no  longer  emerging.         -­‐  Charles  Sanders  Peirce  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   24  /  58  
  25. 25. Firstness   Secondness  Thirdness   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   25  /  58  
  26. 26. Conclusion   Maximize  internaliza=on  by  using  signs,                      but  allow  people  to  assign  their  own  meaning.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   26  /  58  
  27. 27. i3.  NARRATION   The  telling  of  a  story  or  of  happenings.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   27  /  58  
  28. 28. Narra=ve  organizes  not  just  memory,                                but  the  whole  of  human  experience.                                           Narra=ve  is  an  instrument  of  mind                                      that  constructs  our  no=on  of  reality.     -­‐  Jerome  Bruner  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   28  /  58  
  29. 29. Narra%ve  structures  Linear   Story  wrioen  in  the  same  =me  order  as  it   took  place.  Mul%-­‐narra%ve   Two  or  more  stories  run  alongside  each  other;   either  mul=ple  people  telling  the  same  story   or  mul=ple  different  stories  that  alternate.  Reversed   Story  moves  back  in  =me  or  heavily  consists   of  ambiguous  flashbacks  and/or  flash   forwards.  Fragmented   Story  is  all  over  the  place  and  the  audience   has  to  figure  out  what  happened  and  in  what   order.  Metafic%on   Story  within  a  story;  a  type  of  fic=on  that  self-­‐ consciously  addresses  the  devices  of  fic=on,   exposing  the  fic=onal  illusion.  Rhizome   Same  story  told  mul=ple  =mes  with  different   twists  and  endings.  Game   Audience  is  part  of  the  story  and  has  direct   influence  on  it;  the  story  unfolds  as  they  go   along.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   29  /  58  
  30. 30. Marke=ng  typically  follows  the  Hollywood  structure,     aiming  at  comprehension.   While  it  should  adopt  other  structures  to  become     more  interes=ng.   Nobody  comes  out  of  a  movie,  saying     “That  was  a  really  good  movie.  I  really  enjoyed  it.     It  was  really  clear”.   -­‐  Russell  Davies  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   30  /  58  
  31. 31. Conclusion  Maximize  internaliza=on  by  adop=ng                           non-­‐linear  narra=ve  structures.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   31  /  58  
  32. 32. i4.  DIFFERENTIATION   The  act  of  dis=nguishing  by  giving  specific  difference.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   32  /  58  
  33. 33. Different  aspects  or  quan==es  of  knowledge,  possessions  or  culture  can  define  our  status  and   rela=ve  grouping.     -­‐  Jean  Baudrillard  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   33  /  58  
  34. 34. Two  Step  Flow  model   -­‐  Katz  &  Lazarsfeld,  1955  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   34  /  58  
  35. 35. People  tend  to  have  different  roles  within  different                                 social  environments.    In  a  media-­‐fragmented  world  influencer  roles  become   increasingly  important.     Meanwhile  it  takes  more  effort  to  reach  them.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   35  /  58  
  36. 36. Conclusion   Maximize  internaliza=on  by  dis=nguishing  between  and  adap=ng  to  different  social  roles.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   36  /  58  
  37. 37. PHENOMENAL  REALITY     Social     Percep2on   construc2on   CREATION   SIGNIFICATION   NARRATION   DIFFERENTIATION   Internaliza2on  SOCIAL  REALITY   INDIVIDUAL  REALITY   Externaliza*on   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   37  /  58  
  38. 38. e5.  SENSATION  A  percep=on  associated  with  s=mula=on  of  a  sense  organ.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   38  /  58  
  39. 39. Through  the  senses  we  experience    reality  and  create  memories.   -­‐  Kevin  Roberts  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   39  /  58  
  40. 40. SHAPING  PHENOMENA   40  /  58  
  41. 41. The  screen  has  replaced  the  scene.  The  virtual  can  be  seen  as  a  new  dimension  of   hyperreality;  a  perfect  copy  of  reality.     -­‐  Jean  Baudrillard  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   41  /  58  
  42. 42. Mobility   Richness  Max.  1”   Max.  15”   Max.  5”   Max.  120”   Max.  5”   Evenings   Weekdays   Evenings  All  day   Business  hours   weekends   9  to  5   weekends  On-­‐the-­‐go   On  the  couch   In  the  office   On  the  couch   In  store  Interac=ve   Interac=ve   Interac=ve   Linear   Interac=ve  Touch   Touch   Keyboard   Remote  control   Touch  Call,  SMS,     Apps,  sites,   Websites,   Shows,  series,  Apps,  LBS,   magazines,     documents,   Shopping  info   movies  NFC,  music     video,  books   video,  music   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   42  /  58  
  43. 43. Conclusion  Maximize  externaliza=on  by  designing  for   op=mal  sensory  s=mula=on.     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   43  /  58  
  44. 44. e6.  PARTICIPATION   The  act  of  sharing  in  the  ac=vi=es  of  a  group.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   44  /  58  
  45. 45. Tell  me,  and  I  forget  it,   Show  me,  and  I  remember,  Let  me  do  it,  and  I  understand.   -­‐  Confucius  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   45  /  58  
  46. 46. People  need  mo=va=on  to  get  involved.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   46  /  58  
  47. 47. Mo=va=on   Emo%onal   Altruism   Spectrum   Experience   Entertainment   Assembly   Self-­‐expression   Connec=on   Me   We   Informa=on   Compe==on   Convenience   Reference   Economic  value   Collabora=on   Ra%onal  Note:  Model  developed  by  David  Feenstra,  2010   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   47  /  58  
  48. 48. Conclusion  Maximize  externaliza=on  by  triggering  emo=onal  and/or  ra=onal  mo=va=ons.     SHAPING  PHENOMENA   48  /  58  
  49. 49. e7.  INTERPRETATION   A  personal  mental  representa=on  of  the  meaning  of  an  observa=on.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   49  /  58  
  50. 50. Ambiguity  allows  for  mul=ple  interpreta=ons.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   50  /  58  
  51. 51. SHAPING  PHENOMENA   51  /  58  
  52. 52. Aesthe=c  judgment  is  realized  through  spontaneous  synchroniza=on           of  imagina=on  and  mental  capacity.   When  there’s  harmony  we  judge  the  phenomenon  as  being  beau=ful.  When  there’s  disharmony  we  judge  the  phenomenon  as  being  sublime.   -­‐  Immanuel  Kant  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   52  /  58  
  53. 53. -­‐  Self-­‐portrait  by  Rembrandt  van  Rijn  -­‐   -­‐  Self-­‐portrait  by  Francis  Bacon  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   53  /  58  
  54. 54. Eide=c  features  are  the  features  that  cannot  be  changed  without   affec=ng  the  true  essence  of  a  phenomenon.  Eide=c  reduc=on  is  a  form  of  imagina=ve  varia=on  in  which  features  such  as  form,  size  and  characteris=cs  are  changed  in  the  imagina=on         to  find  the  eide=c  features  of  a  phenomenon.   -­‐  Edmund  Husserl  -­‐   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   54  /  58  
  55. 55.  Eide=c  features  of  the  Common  brand  are:   a  product/service  with  a  sustainable  nature,    a  concept  selected  by  the  Common  community,     and  the  brand  name.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   55  /  58  
  56. 56. Conclusion  Maximize  externaliza=on  by  nurturing  different  individual  interpreta=ons,  while  staying  true  to   the  essence  of  the  phenomenon.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   56  /  58  
  57. 57. PHENOMENAL  REALITY     Social     Percep2on   construc2on   CREATION   SIGNIFICATION   NARRATION   DIFFERENTIATION   Internaliza2on  SOCIAL  REALITY   INDIVIDUAL  REALITY   Externaliza2on   SENSATION   PARTICIPATION   INTERPRETATION   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   57  /  58  
  58. 58. How  to  maximize  internaliza=on  &  externaliza=on  1.  CREATION  –    Create  new  tangible  projects  and  products.  2.  SIGNIFICATION  –  Use  signs,  but  let  people  assign  their  own  meaning.  3.  NARRATION  –  Adopt  non-­‐linear  narra=ve  structures.  4.  DIFFERENTIATION  –  Dis=nguish  between  different  social  roles.  5.  SENSATION  –  Design  for  op=mal  sensory  s=mula=on.  6.  PARTICIPATION  –  Trigger  emo=onal  and/or  ra=onal  mo=va=ons.  7.  INTERPRETATION  –  Encourage  different  individual  interpreta=ons.   SHAPING  PHENOMENA   58  /  58  
  59. 59. CASES  
  60. 60. DAVID  LYNCH  1.  CREATION  –  original  outstanding  crea=ve  expressions    2.  SIGNIFICATION  –  use  of  ambiguous  signs  throughout  the  story  3.  NARRATION  –  narra=ve  con=nuously  shirs  in  meaning    4.  DIFFERENTIATION  –  not  relevant  5.  SENSATION  –  disturbing  visuals  and  sounds  with  enormous  impact      6.  PARTICIPATION  –  not  possible  7.  INTERPRETATION  –  designed  to  constantly  throw  the  viewer  off  
  61. 61. BANKSY  1.  CREATION  –  signature  street  art  full  of  mischief  and  mystery  2.  SIGNIFICATION  –  representa=ons  of  popular  culture  3.  NARRATION  –  ever-­‐changing  narra=ves  to  trigger  specula=on    4.  DIFFERENTIATION  –  not  relevant  5.  SENSATION  –  object  and  context  designed  to  create  shock  effect  6.  PARTICIPATION  –  not  possible  7.  INTERPRETATION  –  no  consensus  on  iden=ty,  mo=ve  &  meaning    
  62. 62. MANIFESTO  OBEY  Giant  is  an  experiment  in  phenomenology.  Phenomenology  aoempts  to  enable  people  to  see  clearly  something  that  is  right  before  their  eyes  but  obscured;  things  that  are  so  taken  for  granted  that  they  are  muted  by  abstract  observa=on.  The  first  aim  is  to  reawaken  a  sense  of  wonder  about  one’s  environment.    
  63. 63. SHEPARD  FAIREY  1.  CREATION  –  image  stays  the  same,  context  is  ever-­‐changing  2.  SIGNIFICATION  –  sign  &  context  re-­‐awaken  a  sense  of  wonder  3.  NARRATION  –  narra=ve  emerges  throughout  the  experiment  4.  DIFFERENTIATION  –  project  ini=ally  aimed  at  influencers  5.  SENSATION  –  discomfor=ng  visual  expression      6.  PARTICIPATION  –  community  is  encouraged  &  enabled  to  join  7.  INTERPRETATION  –  open  experiment  without  fixed  meaning    
  64. 64. Arer  turning  the  design  of  the  boole  into  a  popular  icon,       Absolut  transported  this  concept  to  the  virtual  world…  
  65. 65. …and  quickly  realized  it  would  not  be  sufficient.   Absolut  needed  to  adapt  to  a  changing  world.  So  they  decided  to  design  ever-­‐changing  narra=ves     under  the  eide=c  theme  In  An  Absolut  World.   2  expressions…  
  66. 66. ABSOLUT  1.  CREATION  –  installa=ons,  projects,  products  and  pieces  of  art  2.  SIGNIFICATION  –  the  Absolut  boole  turned  into  an  icon  3.  NARRATION  –  the  brand  as  a  crossroads  of  different  narra=ves  4.  DIFFERENTIATION  –  collabora=ons  with  high  profile  influencers    5.  SENSATION  –  s=mula=on  of  sound,  sight  and  taste        6.  PARTICIPATION  –  In  An  Absolut  World  consumers  are  co-­‐creators  7.  INTERPRETATION  –  no  fixed  meaning  (in  some  cases)    
  67. 67. THANKS!   David  Feenstra   Strategic  Planner  hop://denieuwejuniorstrateeg.web-­‐log.nl  
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