• Like
From digital consumption to production and interaction
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

From digital consumption to production and interaction

  • 934 views
Published

A new agenda for digital inclusion and education

A new agenda for digital inclusion and education

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
934
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Will go on later to talk about an even more striking divide
  • (Much starker divide if you consider already low numbers of older internet users)
  • University students easily available, tacit assumption they are ‘lead users’

Transcript

  • 1. From digital consumption to production and interaction: A new agenda for digital inclusion and education IAMCR 2010 Braga, Portugal David Brake http://www.le.ac.uk/mc/ or http://davidbrake.org/ Department of Media and Communications
  • 2. Digital citizenship
    • ‘ Digital citizenship’ and ‘new media literacies’ emphasize the skills and knowledge needed to be effective in the increasingly social media environment, where the distinctions between producer and consumer have evaporated and the blurring between public and private worlds create new ethical challenges and opportunities for children, young people, and adults. (Hobbs & Jensen, 2009, p. 5)
  • 3. Key phrases
    • ‘ Digital citizenship’ and ‘new media literacies’ emphasize the skills and knowledge needed to be effective in the increasingly social media environment, where the distinctions between producer and consumer have evaporated and the blurring between public and private worlds create new ethical challenges and opportunities for children, young people, and adults . (Hobbs & Jensen, 2009, p. 5)
  • 4. Has consumer producer difference evaporated?
    • 34% of college educated vs 24% of high school educated US internet users posted something online (Lenhart, Purcell, Smith, & Zickhur, 2010)
    • 6.9% of school educated internet users in UK had blogs vs 14.8% of graduates (OxIS survey data 2007)
    • Developing countries’ figures look much better but this reflects early adopter nature of internet users there
  • 5. What is ‘effective’ in a social media environment?
  • 6. Digital literacy education – missing pieces
    • Understanding the online ‘attention economy’ – search engine optimisation, the power law
    • Navigating the interactional complexities of public online self-expression (Miller & Arnold, 2001; Brake, 2009)
    • Not just a matter of knowing the tools but knowing how to use them strategically (van Dijk, J. A. G. M., 2005)
  • 7. What are the ethical and other challenges?
    • How and how much should you reveal social information online about yourself and about others?
    • How should you judge others from what you find about them online?
  • 8. Who are the digitally excluded?
    • Children and young people are not the only ones exposed to risks
    • Children and young people are most likely to have internet access and to receive digital literacy education to help them realise benefits.
  • 9. The age divide (in UK) (Dutton, Helsper, & Gerber, 2009)
  • 10. Age and online creative expression Proportion of US internet users who have ever “ shared something online that you created yourself, such as your own artwork, photos, stories or videos” (Lenhart, 2010)
  • 11. Implications of age gap in online creation/self-expression
    • Loss of historical perspective online
    • Loss of experience with political engagement online (as older people tend to be more politically active)
    • Loss of opportunity among older users to build or maintain social capital (Steinfield, Ellison & Lampe, 2008)
  • 12. Research & policy overlooks over-18s
    • Young people (especially university students) get most research attention
    • Risks from inappropriate disclosure online are common to all age groups
  • 13. Social media risk for non-youth
    • cross-tab. (2010). Online Reputation in a Connected World. Retrieved from http://www.microsoft.com/privacy/dpd/research.aspx
    • Older people may have more to lose from inappropriate disclosure and don’t have tacit adolescent licence to experiment
  • 14. Further Questions? Comments?
    • Contact details:
    • David Brake
    • [email_address]
    • http://davidbrake.org/
    • Thank you for coming!