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Present forms future meanings

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English uses various present forms to refer to the future. This is an overview of these forms.

English uses various present forms to refer to the future. This is an overview of these forms.

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    Present forms future meanings Present forms future meanings Presentation Transcript

    • Present forms future meanings
    • Present Simple
    • The concert finishes at midnight. Term starts on 10 April. The sun rises at 6.13 tomorrow.
    • The concert finishes at midnight. Term starts on 10 April. The sun rises at 6.13 tomorrow.
    • these are timetables
    • timetables are like habits (remember we use the Present Simple for habits)
    • about to
    • Don’t go! We’re about to have lunch. It’s about to rain. Let’s close the windows.
    • Don’t go! We’re about to have lunch. It’s about to rain. Let’s close the windows.
    • am is are about to INFINITIVE
    • am is are about to INFINITIVE what’s strange here?
    • am is are about to INFINITIVE prepositions are normally followed by –ING
    • Don’t go! We’re about to have lunch. It’s about to rain. Let’s close the windows.
    • ‘about to’ expresses an action that will happen very soon
    • ‘about to’ is called the Immediate Future
    • going to (1)
    • I’m going to play tennis with John on Thursday. We’re going to study ‘will’ next.
    • I’m going to play tennis with John on Thursday. We’re going to study ‘will’ next.
    • am is are going to INFINITIVE
    • am is are going to INFINITIVE how many verbs?
    • am is are going to INFINITIVE 1 32
    • I’m going to play tennis with John on Thursday. We’re going to study ‘will’ next.
    • ‘going to’ expresses intention
    • ‘going to’ is called the intentional future
    • BUT its meaning is present:
    • BUT its meaning is present: “I’m going to play tennis.” = I have the intention NOW of playing tennis TOMORROW
    • going to (2)
    • Look at those clouds! It’s going to rain.
    • ‘going to’ is used to predict the future based on present evidence
    • Present Continuous
    • I’m flying to Milan on Tuesday. We’re meeting John in the centre later.
    • ‘Present Continuous’ for the Future usually has a time expression.
    • ‘Present Continuous’ expresses plans
    • something is a plan if: - you have a ticket - you have an appointment - you’ve written it in your diary
    • the ‘Present Continuous’ is very common when we talk about arrangements for travel and meeting people
    • We use ‘going to’ and ‘Present Continuous’ to talk about plans and arrangements.
    • We use ‘going to’ and ‘Present Continuous’ to talk about plans and arrangements. NOT ‘will’
    • ‘going to’ vs. ‘Present Continuous’
    • I’m going to fly to Milan next week. I’m flying to Milan next week.
    • I’m going to fly to Milan next week. I’m flying to Milan next week. my intention
    • I’m going to fly to Milan next week. I’m flying to Milan next week. maybe I have a ticket, maybe not
    • I’m going to fly to Milan next week. I’m flying to Milan next week. my plan
    • I’m going to fly to Milan next week. I’m flying to Milan next week. I have a ticket
    • another example
    • They’re going to get married in the autumn. They’re getting married in the autumn.
    • the main verb is ‘to go’
    • I’m going to go to Milan next week.
    • I’m going (to go) to Milan next week.
    • I’m going to go to Milan next week. = I’m going to Milan next week.
    • main verb is ‘to come’
    • They’re going to come to Rome the week after.
    • They’re going to come to Rome the week after.
    • They’re going to come to Rome the week after. = They’re coming to Rome the week after.
    • the present continuous is a subset of ‘going to’ going to present cont.
    • the present continuous is a subset of ‘going to’ intention arrangement
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